Advertisement
HomeCollectionsShangri La
IN THE NEWS

Shangri La

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ELIZABETH SCHUETT | March 25, 1993
Gibsonburg, Ohio -- "Shangri-La is a place where everyon has time to watch the sunset.'' This is what ''Utopia'' means to 13-year-old Ellen.My eighth-graders and I are reading ''Lost Horizon,'' James Hilton's 1930s book about the mythical sanctuary, Shangri-La. They are infatuated with the lifestyle of the residents of the Valley of Blue Moon, high in the mountains of Tibet.''We have all dreamed of Shangri-La, a perfect place. It lives in our mind's eye. Describe yours.'' This was last Thursday's writing assignment and the results were heartwarming and heartbreaking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 27, 2005
The tiny Himalayan nation of Bhutan celebrated its 58th National Day last week in quite a stir over the unexpected announcement by its enlightened ruler, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, that he would abdicate in favor of his son in 2008. At that time, the Buddhist kingdom's first parliamentary elections will be held, and the king will become subject to the parliament's approval. This is only the latest big change to come suddenly from on high for the Bhutanese, who until fairly recently were so isolated from the rest of the world by their mountains and sealed borders that their land was viewed abroad as a latter-day Shangri-La, the very last untouched place.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | September 11, 1992
By the extremely scientific method of counting the names under S in the telephone book, I came up with 12 Chinese restaurants called Szechuan something. (Of course, these didn't include restaurants called something Szechuan, as in the "Hunan-Szechuan Dragon Palace" or whatever.) My point is that owner Paul Chao was smart to change the name of his restaurant on Charles Street near 25th from Szechuan Gourmet to Paul Chao's Shangri-La. Just don't get it confused with his place in Severna Park, known simply as Shangri-La.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
XIANGGELILA, China - The people of this mountain town live in paradise. They know this because the Chinese government has told them so. It's not a paradise of the Communist, workers-of-the-world variety. Rather, local officials insist that this area, high up on the Tibetan plateau, is none other than Shangri-La, land of myth and beauty, source of the fountain of youth. It's the heaven on earth described by James Hilton in his classic novel Lost Horizon and immortalized by Frank Capra in the movie of the same name.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
XIANGGELILA, China - The people of this mountain town live in paradise. They know this because the Chinese government has told them so. It's not a paradise of the Communist, workers-of-the-world variety. Rather, local officials insist that this area, high up on the Tibetan plateau, is none other than Shangri-La, land of myth and beauty, source of the fountain of youth. It's the heaven on earth described by James Hilton in his classic novel Lost Horizon and immortalized by Frank Capra in the movie of the same name.
TRAVEL
By William A. Davis and William A. Davis,Boston Globe | March 11, 2001
Climbing into the circling hills, the narrow access road rounds a curve, and, like a mirage, the Balsams Grand Resort Hotel suddenly appears: a rambling, red-roofed complex silhouetted against a granite ridge in Dixville Notch, N.H. The impression is of a Yankee version of Shangri-La -- which is not all that far-fetched. The original Shangri-La in James Hilton's classic escapist novel "Lost Horizon" is a monastery in a remote Himalayan valley, a place where no creature comfort is lacking and all the civilized arts and virtues are culti- vated.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 2000
BEIJING - The millions of Chinese who watched the 1997 movie "Red River Valley" saw the following images of paradise lost: Enchanted with each other and their surroundings, two young lovers roll amid wildflowers in a Tibetan meadow beneath the snow-capped Himalayas. Then a drum roll sounds across the grassland like a gathering storm, and an army appears on the horizon. During the next hour of the movie, produced by China's state-owned Shanghai Film Studios, the army decimates a Tibetan village, which is portrayed as a remote community of kindly, noble people.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1941: New Deal builds Greenbelt1942: Liberty ships sail from Baltimore1942: FDR picks Shangri-La site (later Camp David)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | February 10, 1995
Pier 500 has the great location (the HarborView Marina), with a dining room on the water, but somehow it's never found the right identity. In its latest incarnation, Pier 500 is a seafood restaurant, with Bernard Pfanner from Danny's as its executive chef. The biggest hits on the new menu so far have been the flounder Pontchartrain, lobster thermidor and bouillabaisse. The most unusual: an individual baked Alaska that's billed as low fat. (It's made with frozen yogurt.)* A reader called to report that the Owl Bar in the Belvedere is selling cigars -- and both men and women are smoking them.
NEWS
April 28, 2002
CATHOLIC RELIEF Services was a trendsetter when it moved its headquarters from New York to downtown Baltimore in 1989. Soon, a bevy of other important nonprofit agencies -- ranging from the Annie E. Casey Foundation to a slew of religious aid organizations -- followed, drawn by this city's reasonable costs and its proximity to Washington. Because of this symbolism, it's dismaying that the U.S. Catholic bishops' official international relief and development arm is thinking of abandoning its downtown location.
NEWS
April 28, 2002
CATHOLIC RELIEF Services was a trendsetter when it moved its headquarters from New York to downtown Baltimore in 1989. Soon, a bevy of other important nonprofit agencies -- ranging from the Annie E. Casey Foundation to a slew of religious aid organizations -- followed, drawn by this city's reasonable costs and its proximity to Washington. Because of this symbolism, it's dismaying that the U.S. Catholic bishops' official international relief and development arm is thinking of abandoning its downtown location.
NEWS
June 8, 2001
THE ROYALS of Nepal, the world's only Hindu kingdom, are sent to Eton College to be English schoolboys and return to the high Himalayas to become gods. It is a challenging transition. The slaughter of the royal family last Friday undermines a monarchy that was absolute until 1990 when it limited its own powers and brought in elective democracy, leading to a Communist government followed by one akin to India's Congress Party. For a century, the Shah kings were held prisoner by the Rana prime ministers, but for the past half-century, the Shahs have prevailed by marrying Rana women.
FEATURES
By Howard Cohen and Howard Cohen,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 2001
Despite the portentous title of Stevie Nicks' first solo CD in seven years, the Fleetwood Mac singer assures fans her "crystal visions" are clear again. "Trouble in Shangri-La," her collection of relationship-based songs, hits stores this month and the tracks come "pretty much from my life," Nicks says. But the CD's release comes at a time that finds Nicks healthy and seemingly in vogue again. Such wasn't the case when her last album, 1994's problematic "Street Angel," nearly capsized her career.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 2000
BEIJING - The millions of Chinese who watched the 1997 movie "Red River Valley" saw the following images of paradise lost: Enchanted with each other and their surroundings, two young lovers roll amid wildflowers in a Tibetan meadow beneath the snow-capped Himalayas. Then a drum roll sounds across the grassland like a gathering storm, and an army appears on the horizon. During the next hour of the movie, produced by China's state-owned Shanghai Film Studios, the army decimates a Tibetan village, which is portrayed as a remote community of kindly, noble people.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1941: New Deal builds Greenbelt1942: Liberty ships sail from Baltimore1942: FDR picks Shangri-La site (later Camp David)
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Explorers have finally found Shangri-La.It may not be quite the storied, verdant, utopian Himalayan paradise of James Hilton's 1933 novel "Lost Horizon" and the movies of the same name.But it is verdant, it is a kind of paradise and it is hidden deep within Tibet's Himalayan Mountains in a monstrously steep gorge within a gorge. There is no record of any human visiting, or even seeing, the area before.Tucked beneath a mountain spur at a sharp bend of the Tsangpo River, where the cliff sides are only 75 yards apart and cast perpetual shadows, the place failed to show up even on satellite surveillance photographs of the area.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
The tiny Himalayan nation of Bhutan celebrated its 58th National Day last week in quite a stir over the unexpected announcement by its enlightened ruler, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, that he would abdicate in favor of his son in 2008. At that time, the Buddhist kingdom's first parliamentary elections will be held, and the king will become subject to the parliament's approval. This is only the latest big change to come suddenly from on high for the Bhutanese, who until fairly recently were so isolated from the rest of the world by their mountains and sealed borders that their land was viewed abroad as a latter-day Shangri-La, the very last untouched place.
NEWS
January 6, 1993
Perhaps the demise of affordable housing legislation i Howard County was inevitable. In one of the wealthiest counties in the country, where the affluent are drawn by a pristine environment, good schools and countless amenities, the pressure to maintain the status quo must be enormous. Certainly, three council members -- Republicans Charles Feaga and Darrel Drown, as well as Democrat Shane Pendergrass -- felt that pressure.Monday night, they yielded to the wishes of a constituency whose stated concerns are overcrowding, the environment and questions about the proper role of government.
NEWS
By Laird B. Anderson | January 11, 1998
ONE OF THE THINGS I remember most about my recent two-month trip to Nepal, the home of Mount Everest, is the slogan, "Horn Please," that's scrawled on the back of many trucks and buses in Kathmandu, the capital city. Everyone graciously accepts the invitation to honk as small cars, taxis and mopeds pollute the air of this ancient and fascinating city of Hindu and Buddhist culture. The rushing traffic is indicative of the vibrancy in this 7-year-old constitutional monarchy.In the United States, the horn usually brings a scowl of surprise and anger accompanied by a fist-shake or a rude gesture.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.