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By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | October 10, 1994
The Candlelight Concert Society opened its season Saturday night at Howard Community College Theatre with a performance by the Shanghai String Quartet.The strength of the quartet lies in the hands of the two wonderful brothers Weigang Li and Honggang Li. Weigang Li is a superb first violinist with world class skills and the ability to alter his sound to meet the demands that great quartet writing can give the first violin. Honggang Li is every inch the artist and this reviewer felt that the second violin was one of the driving forces in the ensemble.
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NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
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FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 11, 1991
SOMETHING SPECIAL: A benefit performance of "The Fantasticks" will be held in the Essex Community College Theatre on Oct. 15 at 8 p.m. Proceeds from this one-time-only performance will help defray the $12,000 airfare for the 10-member company from Cockpit in Court Theatre, which will be traveling to China later in the month.The company, under the watchful eye of Bill Ellis and F. Scott Black, is the sole United States representative at the 1991 Shanghai International Workers Art Festival, Oct. 20-28, which will also celebrate the 700th anniversary of the founding of Shanghai.
SPORTS
Sun staff | January 6, 2012
It's end of a golden era, ladies and gentlemen. Attempt to contain your grief over this news. Baltimore's own Olympic legend, Michael Phelps, has parted ways with longtime girlfriend Nicole Johnson, the New York Post reports . Phelps and Johnson, a former Miss California, had dated off an on over a span of several years. Johnson had gone with Phelps to July's FINA world championships in Shanghai, according to the Post. Phelps didn't make the same kind of waves (terrible pun intended)
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | December 31, 1991
SHANGHAI, China -- The Long Bar is long gone. Say hello to the Colonel.During the decadent decades preceding the Chinese Communist Revolution, when Shanghai was known as "the Paris of the Orient" or more accurately "the whore of the East," legions of Western adventurers, traders and taipans (foreign business owners) drank themselves into a stupor over the Long Bar, a 110-foot-long slab of wood in the old Shanghai Club.More than a mere watering hole, the Long Bar symbolized colonial Shanghai -- a time when China's largest, most industrialized city was carved into profitable, vice-ridden concessions controlled by Britain, France and other Western nations at the expense of the suffering of millions of Chinese.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
SHANGHAI, China -- The Xue family is very close, at times too close for their own comfort.Four generations -- 10 people in all -- live in a 200-square-foot apartment that has been the family's home for 28 years. That's a single bed's worth of living space for each person.The Xue family's kitchen is a hot plate in the hallway of their dilapidated, 60-year-old apartment building. They share a communal toilet with residents of three other flats.For a semblance of privacy, the Xues divided their one room into two spaces and built a sleeping loft with three feet of headroom.
BUSINESS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 1998
BEIJING -- It's not every day that the president of the United States unveils your design plans, but that's what happened in Shanghai last night to Harold L. Adams, chairman of Baltimore-based RTKL Associates Inc., one of the world's largest design companies.At a small reception at the Shanghai Art Museum, President Clinton and Shanghai Mayor Xu Kuangdi pulled away a red velvet cover to reveal a photo rendering of RTKL's design for a $200 million Shanghai science center."It went extremely well," Adams said in a telephone interview, adding that the president said he was pleased that the contract had gone to an American company and correctly pronounced the company's name.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 2003
SHANGHAI, China - A Taiwanese airliner picked up passengers yesterday at the international airport in Shanghai, China, and returned to Taiwan, breaking a 54-year freeze on commercial aviation across the Taiwan Strait. The flight by the China Airlines Boeing 747 was the first of 16 charter flights to help Taiwanese living in China return home for the lunar new year holiday and was billed as an important step toward restoring transportation links between the two political rivals. Like most efforts to improve relations between China and Taiwan, this one was characterized by caveats and hair-splitting.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
A Baltimore architecture firm beat several other American firms to win a competition to design residential and commercial buildings in Shanghai. Design Collective, a 70-person firm with offices on Pratt Street, was chosen by a jury of Chinese and American architects in a process that lasted a year and a half, company officials said yesterday. The firm won a $100,000 prize and the right to negotiate a contract with the Chinese developer that is building the site, said Richard Burns, a principal with the firm.
NEWS
October 19, 2001
PRESIDENT Bush is doing just what he should by going to the APEC summit in Shanghai and meeting one-on-one with the two superpower leaders there. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum was established in 1989 to promote trade and prosperity around the Pacific Rim. Leaders have not always known what the summits were for. But with the world facing recession, coordinating the revival effort at the highest level is essential. A byproduct planned by the Chinese hosts was to show off Shanghai, rapidly becoming what it was in the 1920s: a commercial hub of Asia to rival Hong Kong, Singapore and, eventually, Tokyo.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Baltimore-based RTKL Associates Inc. recently beat two international rivals to win a contract to design an iconic structure for a city along the Yangtze River in China. Last winter, RTKL and two other architectural firms — one British, the other French — were invited by a real estate subsidiary of Chinese steel conglomerate Jiangsu Shagang Group to submit plans for a twin-tower, mixed-use project in Zhangjiagang, a city of about 1.5 million people 60 miles west of Shanghai. RTKL won with a design for two high-rise towers connected by an elliptical atrium.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
For all Michael Phelps has accomplished and for all the world records he has smashed, it has still become a bit of a tradition for the swimming world to doubt him on eve of the FINA World Championships. The World Championships, which are held every two years and regarded as the biggest non-Olympic competition in swimming, begin Sunday morning in Shanghai, China, and once again, the world isn't sure what to expect from Phelps — other than he'll be competing in four individual events: the 200 meter freestyle, the 200 meter individual medley and the 100 and 200 meter butterfly.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 28, 2008
I have a 26-hour layover in Shanghai, China. Can I store my luggage at the airport and do some sightseeing? Are there short-stay hotels? Because Shanghai is an important business center and a common stopover on Asia routes, Pudong International Airport is well-prepared for travelers like you. Here is a rundown on offerings, with recommendations from tourism and airport officials: If you decide to stow your luggage and do some exploring, you'll find...
BUSINESS
By Don Lee and Don Lee,Los Angeles Times | May 3, 2008
SHANGHAI, China - If American travelers thought they had it bad these days, consider what happened to passengers on 18 China Eastern flights recently. The planes took off from Kunming airport in southern China. Some turned around in mid-air. Others reached their destinations, but without letting passengers off; then the jets flew back to Kunming. The weather wasn't an issue, nor was mechanical trouble, investigators said. Rather, it was a collective act of defiance by pilots unhappy about their pay, schedules and lack of rest, and lifetime contracts that they can break only by paying a fortune.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Hirsch and Jerry Hirsch,Los Angeles Times | April 12, 2008
MODESTO, Calif. -- When Liu Lan entertains clients at her cosmetics shop in Shanghai, China, she pulls out a jug of Gallo's Carlo Rossi red wine. "The taste is fresh and it's easy to get used to," said Liu, 32, who thinks the big bottle "looks special, different from other wines." The shop in crowded Shanghai represents just how much has changed since Ernest and Julio Gallo founded E.& J. Gallo Winery in an industrial section of rural Modesto after Prohibition ended in 1933. With annual sales of $3.5 billion - about 70 million cases of wine - Gallo is the nation's largest winemaker.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2007
Erin Strevig's plans for the next few weeks are clear: Master eating with chopsticks. Find and bring home a panda bear. Oh, and remember to win a gold medal. A year before the world turns its attention to Beijing for the summer Olympics, Strevig and thousands of other athletes from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe will descend on Shanghai, China, for the 2007 Special Olympics World Summer Games, which run from Oct. 2 to 11. A mix of eight Maryland cyclists, bocce players, sailors and equestrians like Strevig will represent the United States, as part of a team of about 400 U.S. athletes.
NEWS
May 2, 1996
EACH ADJOINS a formerly hostile superpower, the other. Proximity breeds suspicion and conflict, but creates a greater mutual interest in peace and economic cooperation. China and Russia are not fated to be enemies, but must work at avoiding it. If they can ease tensions and reduce troops on their backside, each can address pressing problems in front -- China on the Pacific Rim, Russia in Europe and Central Asia.Russian President Boris Yeltsin's triumphant trip to Beijing and Shanghai last weekend should help him in the Russian presidential election.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 17, 2000
SHANGHAI, China -- For hundreds of foreign visitors, the search for Old Shanghai begins at a yellow stucco apartment building along a narrow alley in the heart of the city's French Concession. People seek out the Art Deco structure not for its beauty, but for the woman who lives on the third floor: retired U.S. diplomat and author, Tess Johnston. Some come from as far away as England and Russia looking for the colonial homes they grew up in during Shanghai's illustrious past. Others -- journalists, tour book writers and historians -- come to explore the city's eclectic architectural heritage.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Abigail Goldman and Don Lee and Abigail Goldman,Los Angeles Times | September 9, 2007
SHANGHAI -- Get ready for a new Chinese export: higher prices. For years, American consumers have enjoyed falling prices for goods made in China, thanks to relentless cost-cutting by retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target. But the spate of product recalls in recent months - Mattel announced another last week - has exposed deep fault lines in Chinese manufacturing. Manufacturers and analysts say some of the quality breakdowns are a result of financially strapped factories substituting materials or taking other shortcuts to cover higher operating costs.
NEWS
July 20, 2007
CHENG SHIFA, 86 Painter, cartoonist Famed Chinese painter, cartoonist and calligrapher Cheng Shifa has died in his hometown of Shanghai, local media reported. He was 86. According to the Shanghai Daily newspaper, Mr. Cheng died Tuesday in a city hospital after an undisclosed illness. Although known early on as a cartoonist and illustrator, Mr. Cheng became best known for his traditional brush paintings of minority tribes from the southwestern province of Yunnan. Those works won artistic praise and political favor for stressing the unity of all Chinese ethnic groups.
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