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Shane Battier

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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Shane Battier has long had the ability to morph into the kind of player his team needed him to become. As a senior in high school outside Detroit, Battier suddenly showed he could score. As a freshman at Duke, he launched his reputation as a defensive stopper; by his junior year, he was the team's unquestioned leader. So what Battier has done as an NBA rookie for the Memphis Grizzlies shouldn't be that surprising. The Grizzlies, a team that won 23 games during the final season of a six-year stay in Vancouver, needed a lot of everything when they moved here.
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By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Who will be the Adam Morrison of this version of March Madness? The Joakim Noah? The Sean May, the Emeka Okafor, the J.J. Redick, the Shane Battier ... You get the point. Some player in the NCAA tournament will either elevate himself into the heavens or ride a wave of adulation that was built pre-tournament - and by the time he lands, he will be not only a college legend, but also the talk of the run-up to the NBA draft. Except the landing will come far short of the same level of pro stardom that he enjoyed in college.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - College basketball is often measured in moments, freeze-frame memories of shots or certain games that help define a player's career. Considering the history at Duke over coach Mike Krzyzewski's first 20 seasons, those snapshots could fill the walls of Cameron Indoor Stadium. There would be sections devoted to Johnny Dawkins and Tommy Amaker, to Danny Ferry and Mark Alarie, to Bobby Hurley and Steve Wojciechowski, and larger sections to Christian Laettner and Grant Hill. But what type of recognition would Shane Battier receive?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Shane Battier has long had the ability to morph into the kind of player his team needed him to become. As a senior in high school outside Detroit, Battier suddenly showed he could score. As a freshman at Duke, he launched his reputation as a defensive stopper; by his junior year, he was the team's unquestioned leader. So what Battier has done as an NBA rookie for the Memphis Grizzlies shouldn't be that surprising. The Grizzlies, a team that won 23 games during the final season of a six-year stay in Vancouver, needed a lot of everything when they moved here.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Duke dispatched Maryland last night in part because the Terps' top guns were silenced in the second half. The Blue Devils are in tomorrow night's national championship game because of the reversals done by the scoring leaders of each team. As Duke's Shane Battier and Jason Williams heated up, Juan Dixon and Lonny Baxter cooled down, and Maryland was doomed to a 95-84 defeat. Baxter and Dixon were a combined 1-for-12 from the field in the second half. Baxter, the MVP of the West Regional, missed his four shots, as all three of his points after the break came at the free-throw line.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - After he'd coached Duke to its third national championship Monday night, Mike Krzyzewski rejected the notion that Shane Battier's departure - and the possibility of Jason Williams leaving early - marked an end of an era for the Blue Devils' program, which had been in two Final Fours in the past three years. "Our program is not an era program," said Krzyzewski, whose team got 18 second-half points from Mike Dunleavy Jr. to beat Arizona, 82-72. "We've been pretty good year after year.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
They rolled to 35 victories and their third national championship with an explosive offense and an intimidating style, winning by more than 20 points a game. They return four starters, will plug in a dynamic player who transferred from another conference and boast the preseason choice for Player of the Year. Yes, the Duke Blue Devils, despite losing the one-two punch of talent and leadership that defined Shane Battier, could be even better this time around. Yes, the Duke Blue Devils could win it all again.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - For those Duke students who found occasion to walk along the path between Mirecourt House and York House this past week, there are two distinct reminders of the bonfire that Blue Devils supporters sparked after Saturday's thrilling 98-96 overtime victory over Maryland in College Park. First, the faint odor of charred wood still lingers, a reminder of the remarkable 11th-hour rally that propelled No. 2 Duke (19-1, 7-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) from a 10-point deficit in the final minute of regulation to an improbable win. Second, and most importantly, there is a blackened oval on the ground, where the grass has been burned beyond recognition.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 3, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - It has to be a rough morning for Maryland basketball fans. By now, you're late for work because you've stayed up to watch the NCAA basketball championship game. And while you're sipping that coffee, you keep switching the TV channel. Everywhere you look, there is a Blue Devil. Click. It's Shane Battier and Jason Williams on ESPN. Click. It's Coach K on Good Morning America. By the end of tonight, Duke will be featured again on ESPN Classic. Probably, the "Road to Glory" with three of the games against Maryland.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2000
DURHAM, N.C. -- Terence Morris can relate to the gunslinger of Old West myth, the man wannabe hotshots measured themselves against. Thursday in Raleigh, N.C. State's Damon Thornton had some monster jams and putbacks to punctuate his matchup against Morris, the Maryland ace who began this season as the most highly regarded power forward in college basketball. A week from today, Georgia Tech's Jason Collier will try to showcase his talents against Morris. First, however, comes a challenge from the ACC rival who most closely duplicates the versatility and potential in Morris' game.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
They rolled to 35 victories and their third national championship with an explosive offense and an intimidating style, winning by more than 20 points a game. They return four starters, will plug in a dynamic player who transferred from another conference and boast the preseason choice for Player of the Year. Yes, the Duke Blue Devils, despite losing the one-two punch of talent and leadership that defined Shane Battier, could be even better this time around. Yes, the Duke Blue Devils could win it all again.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
When Robert Parish looks around the NBA these days, he doesn't see very many players like him. To be sure, there are plenty of 7-footers, but there are, in Parish's view, few classic back-to-the-basket centers. "I don't think there are any true centers in the NBA, except for Shaq [Shaquille O'Neal], [Dikembe] Mutombo and David Robinson. Those are the only three legitimate centers in the league," said Parish, now coach of the Maryland Mustangs of the U.S. Basketball League. "The others, I think, are just big forwards.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - After he'd coached Duke to its third national championship Monday night, Mike Krzyzewski rejected the notion that Shane Battier's departure - and the possibility of Jason Williams leaving early - marked an end of an era for the Blue Devils' program, which had been in two Final Fours in the past three years. "Our program is not an era program," said Krzyzewski, whose team got 18 second-half points from Mike Dunleavy Jr. to beat Arizona, 82-72. "We've been pretty good year after year.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 3, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - It has to be a rough morning for Maryland basketball fans. By now, you're late for work because you've stayed up to watch the NCAA basketball championship game. And while you're sipping that coffee, you keep switching the TV channel. Everywhere you look, there is a Blue Devil. Click. It's Shane Battier and Jason Williams on ESPN. Click. It's Coach K on Good Morning America. By the end of tonight, Duke will be featured again on ESPN Classic. Probably, the "Road to Glory" with three of the games against Maryland.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 3, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - It has to be a rough morning for Maryland basketball fans. By now, you're late for work because you stayed up to watch the NCAA basketball championship game. And while you're sipping coffee, you keep switching the TV channel. Everywhere you look, there is a Blue Devil. Click. It's Shane Battier and Jason Williams on ESPN. Click. It's Coach K on "Good Morning, America." By the end of tonight, Duke likely will be featured again on ESPN Classic. Probably, the "Road to Glory" with three of the games against Maryland.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Duke dispatched Maryland last night in part because the Terps' top guns were silenced in the second half. The Blue Devils are in tomorrow night's national championship game because of the reversals done by the scoring leaders of each team. As Duke's Shane Battier and Jason Williams heated up, Juan Dixon and Lonny Baxter cooled down, and Maryland was doomed to a 95-84 defeat. Baxter and Dixon were a combined 1-for-12 from the field in the second half. Baxter, the MVP of the West Regional, missed his four shots, as all three of his points after the break came at the free-throw line.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 3, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - It has to be a rough morning for Maryland basketball fans. By now, you're late for work because you stayed up to watch the NCAA basketball championship game. And while you're sipping coffee, you keep switching the TV channel. Everywhere you look, there is a Blue Devil. Click. It's Shane Battier and Jason Williams on ESPN. Click. It's Coach K on "Good Morning, America." By the end of tonight, Duke likely will be featured again on ESPN Classic. Probably, the "Road to Glory" with three of the games against Maryland.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
OAKLAND, Calif. - In a matchup that eventually lived up to its billing, Casey Jacobsen hit a short jumper off the glass with 3.6 seconds remaining to give No. 3 Stanford an 84-83 victory over top-ranked Duke last night in the Pete Newell Challenge. Jacobsen, who finished with 26 points, put Stanford ahead for the first time in the second half by shooting over Duke's Jason Williams, capping a Cardinal comeback from a 15-point deficit. Williams, who finished with 22 points, missed a potential game-winning layup as the clock expired.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - For those Duke students who found occasion to walk along the path between Mirecourt House and York House this past week, there are two distinct reminders of the bonfire that Blue Devils supporters sparked after Saturday's thrilling 98-96 overtime victory over Maryland in College Park. First, the faint odor of charred wood still lingers, a reminder of the remarkable 11th-hour rally that propelled No. 2 Duke (19-1, 7-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) from a 10-point deficit in the final minute of regulation to an improbable win. Second, and most importantly, there is a blackened oval on the ground, where the grass has been burned beyond recognition.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - College basketball is often measured in moments, freeze-frame memories of shots or certain games that help define a player's career. Considering the history at Duke over coach Mike Krzyzewski's first 20 seasons, those snapshots could fill the walls of Cameron Indoor Stadium. There would be sections devoted to Johnny Dawkins and Tommy Amaker, to Danny Ferry and Mark Alarie, to Bobby Hurley and Steve Wojciechowski, and larger sections to Christian Laettner and Grant Hill. But what type of recognition would Shane Battier receive?
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