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By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1995
MOSCOW -- Shamil Basayev, the guerrilla commander who controls the fate of hostages in southern Russia, inherited a long and proud ancestral tradition of suicidal resistance to invaders of his native Chechnya.Central to that tradition was the Basayev family's stone house -- built in the year 1010 and now reportedly destroyed by Russian bombs -- in the village of Vedeno.A great-great-great-grandfather died as a deputy to Imam Shamil, for whom Shamil Basayev was named. The imam, fighting to create an independent Islamic state, held off the czar's army for four decades before surrendering in 1859.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 11, 2002
MOSCOW - The Kremlin dismisses him as a terrorist and a bandit. But Shamil Basayev, who plotted the seizure of more than 800 hostages in a Moscow theater last month, represents more than just another gunman with a grudge. The guerrilla leader is the product of a fierce mountain culture hardened by two centuries of struggle against Russian rule. And he has proven himself one of Moscow's most skillful and determined foes. The 37-year-old warlord, thought to be hiding in Chechnya's snow-capped mountains, says the hostage seizure - which led to at least 169 deaths - was justified by the Russian military's record of attacks on Chechen civilians.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian television viewers have a pretty high threshold for amazement. That's understandable in a country that has recently watched a coup attempt, its empire die, an internationally broadcast assault by the president on Parliament, and a brutal war.But even for Russia, the sight of the stolid, dour prime minister, Viktor Chernomyrdin, negotiating live, on television, with the leader of a band of Chechen terrorists provoked amazement here yesterday.People...
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | October 4, 1999
TO ANYONE who observed Russia's brutal war in Chechnya earlier this decade, its headlong rush into another tangle with Muslim mountain warriors appears mad.It is a true "wag the dog" scenario: Russian politicians, with an eye to coming parliamentary and presidential elections, are trying to distract voters from corruption scandals and economic woes.Russia has massed tens of thousands of troops on the Chechen border, and is bombing an already pulverized republic back beyond the Stone Age, supposedly to crush Islamic militants.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | October 4, 1999
TO ANYONE who observed Russia's brutal war in Chechnya earlier this decade, its headlong rush into another tangle with Muslim mountain warriors appears mad.It is a true "wag the dog" scenario: Russian politicians, with an eye to coming parliamentary and presidential elections, are trying to distract voters from corruption scandals and economic woes.Russia has massed tens of thousands of troops on the Chechen border, and is bombing an already pulverized republic back beyond the Stone Age, supposedly to crush Islamic militants.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1997
MOSCOW -- Citizens of the breakaway republic of Chechnya will pick their way through the rubble of war tomorrow to reach polling places and vote for a new president and parliament.Their voting in effect will ratify a five-month peace agreement with Russia and also strengthen the de facto independence that the region won last year, when Russia abandoned its bloody 21-month effort to crush Chechnya's secessionist movement.All 16 presidential candidates are separatists, guaranteeing that matter who wins, the issue of secession from Russia will remain.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 11, 2002
MOSCOW - The Kremlin dismisses him as a terrorist and a bandit. But Shamil Basayev, who plotted the seizure of more than 800 hostages in a Moscow theater last month, represents more than just another gunman with a grudge. The guerrilla leader is the product of a fierce mountain culture hardened by two centuries of struggle against Russian rule. And he has proven himself one of Moscow's most skillful and determined foes. The 37-year-old warlord, thought to be hiding in Chechnya's snow-capped mountains, says the hostage seizure - which led to at least 169 deaths - was justified by the Russian military's record of attacks on Chechen civilians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2006
MOSCOW -- A Russian Parliamentary commission issued its final report yesterday on the terrorist seizure of a public school in Beslan in 2004, briefly highlighting law enforcement mistakes but placing blame for the hundreds of deaths on the terrorists alone. The long-awaited conclusion, read aloud by the commission's chairman during a session of the parliament's upper house, ended more than two years of investigation into the worst terrorist act in modern Russian history. It suggested a hardening of the Kremlin's position on one of the most painful public episodes of President Vladimir V. Putin's administration, brushing aside lingering questions about the events and insisting that authorities, in spite of many well-documented problems, had done an adequate job. The Kremlin had pledged that the special commission, stacked with politicians loyal to Putin and working out of public view, would establish the facts and report the truth.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
MOSCOW - The leader of a violent Islamic militant group believed to be responsible for a wave of shootings and bombings in the southern Russian republic of Dagestan was killed yesterday in a four-hour shootout with police, authorities said. The apparent death of Rasul Makasharipov, a former interpreter for Chechen separatist leader Shamil Basayev, was seen as a significant development for authorities who have been virtually under siege in the republic, which borders the war-torn republic of Chechnya.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
THE RUSSIAN government says it will kick ABC-TV out of the country because Nightline had the effrontery to show an interview with a Chechen rebel leader named Shamil Basayev, who has been behind some of the bloodiest and most humiliating episodes in Russia's war to retain the breakaway republic. And until the network's staff people can get their bags packed, Moscow has ordered all Russian officials to refuse to speak to them. Has Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed on as a Kremlin adviser in his spare time?
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1997
MOSCOW -- Citizens of the breakaway republic of Chechnya will pick their way through the rubble of war tomorrow to reach polling places and vote for a new president and parliament.Their voting in effect will ratify a five-month peace agreement with Russia and also strengthen the de facto independence that the region won last year, when Russia abandoned its bloody 21-month effort to crush Chechnya's secessionist movement.All 16 presidential candidates are separatists, guaranteeing that matter who wins, the issue of secession from Russia will remain.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian television viewers have a pretty high threshold for amazement. That's understandable in a country that has recently watched a coup attempt, its empire die, an internationally broadcast assault by the president on Parliament, and a brutal war.But even for Russia, the sight of the stolid, dour prime minister, Viktor Chernomyrdin, negotiating live, on television, with the leader of a band of Chechen terrorists provoked amazement here yesterday.People...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1995
MOSCOW -- Shamil Basayev, the guerrilla commander who controls the fate of hostages in southern Russia, inherited a long and proud ancestral tradition of suicidal resistance to invaders of his native Chechnya.Central to that tradition was the Basayev family's stone house -- built in the year 1010 and now reportedly destroyed by Russian bombs -- in the village of Vedeno.A great-great-great-grandfather died as a deputy to Imam Shamil, for whom Shamil Basayev was named. The imam, fighting to create an independent Islamic state, held off the czar's army for four decades before surrendering in 1859.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2001
MOSCOW - A Russian court convicted six men yesterday - sentencing two of them to life terms - in the September 1999 bombing of an apartment building in the republic of Dagestan. The blast was the first of a series of bombings that killed 367 Russians and injured more than 650 others in late 1999 and mobilized public opinion in favor of the war against separatist rebels in Chechnya, which borders Dagestan. The trial, which started in late November, is the first court proceeding brought by Russian prosecutors to pin responsibility for the wave of apartment bombings that also incited then-Prime Minister Vladimir Putin to escalate a limited military action into a full-scale military assault to crush the Chechen resistance, a battle that festers as a low-intensity conflict of skirmishes and mine warfare.
NEWS
June 20, 1995
First they tried it Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev's way: force. Two Russian assaults on the Chechen rebels holding 1,500 hostages in a hospital in Budyonnovsk in southern Russia led only to more than 100 hostage deaths.Then they tried it the way of President Boris Yeltsin's critics in the Duma and in the Group of Seven: politically. Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin took charge and, on the phone before millions of televiewers, conceded rebel commander Shamil Basayev's demands.With hostages freed, this crisis is over.
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