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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | March 5, 2000
I was introduced to shallots many moons ago in a recipe for liver pate. They were eye-poppingly expensive, but I wanted to treat Gary, my then-new husband, so I splurged. Small, with copper-colored, papery skin, they looked undistinguished on the outside. But inside, they were beautiful -- iridescent, like purple-striated opals. Gary declared it the best pate he'd ever tasted. Twentysomething years later, I still make liver pate, and occasionally substitute sweet onion for shallots, but he can always tell the difference.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2008
It was a salad that got started by mistake. I was in the garden, weeding between the shallots, when the blade from the weeding tool accidentally nicked a shallot. It was an inadvertent harvest. This happens more often than I care to admit. I will be puttering around and I uproot something or step on some promising crop. It is a part of gardening, and I have learned to salvage dishes from these unwitting moves. The other day, for instance, the suddenly harvested shallot became part of the dressing for a salad.
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NEWS
By ROHINA PHADNIS and ROHINA PHADNIS,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
The mild sweetness of shallots and the fresh crunch of spring onions complement the arrival of warm weather and a season of rebirth. Spring onions are genetically identical to the common onion, says Wayne Mininger, executive vice president of the National Onion Association. But they look and taste different because they are planted very close together and harvested prematurely to give a milder flavor than a common onion, he says. Though spring and green onions are often used interchangeably, there is a difference between them.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 9, 2007
Daniel Wecker, Elkridge Furnace Inn executive chef and owner, may not even be aware that his words echo an old Latvian proverb: "A smiling face is half the meal." Small wonder that when he was recently asked by a student in a cooking class to name his favorite meal to prepare, Wecker quickly replied, "Whatever makes people happy." With more than 600 sauces in his repertoire, it is safe to say that Wecker, 48, has hundreds of culinary options at his fingertips that make people happy - whether dining in his restaurant, attending an event, or, in this case, learning the art of French cooking.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 8, 2004
It's become routine for me to respond to casual dinner invitations from good friends by offering to bring a homemade dish to the meal. I am not the only one. Lately I've noticed that more and more guests seem to arrive at informal gatherings with a contribution. It seems to be a trend -- one with a logical explanation. Most of our friends lead hectic lives trying to balance demanding jobs, children's schedules and community commitments with entertaining. Finding time to plan and cook an entire meal can seem like a Herculean task, but when others volunteer to bring part of the night's fare -- a salad, a side dish or a dessert, for example -- then the stress factor is reduced and playing host for a supper or dinner seems much more manageable.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 23, 2005
I love a good burger, but with its calorie and fat content, the classic American sandwich has become a rare indulgence. I do try to use the leanest ground meats for those times when the hankering becomes overwhelming. Recently, I looked through the cupboards and refrigerator for something to add more flavor to the lean meat. Shallots and garlic came to the rescue. Then I made a quick mustard-barbecue sauce to drizzle over the burgers. Serve these indulgences with lettuce and tomato, if you like, but you won't need any ketchup.
FEATURES
By UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | February 21, 2001
Meatloaf is the quintessential American comfort food, and this version is pleasing enough to be served at any family gathering. All the robust flavor of the classic meatloaf has been left in, but the calories have been lightened by using ground turkey instead of beef. Sauteed shallots, carrots and mushrooms, plus a touch of sage, make it extra savory. As with all meatloaf, this makes super leftovers and, of course, great sandwiches. Meatloaf Serves 6 1/2 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 large shallots, finely chopped 1/2 cup finely chopped carrot 10 ounces small white mushrooms, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 pound lean ground turkey 1 1/4 cups fresh bread crumbs 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and grated 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage leaves or 1 teaspoon dried, crumbled 1 large egg, lightly beaten In a large nonstick skillet, bring the broth and oil to a simmer over medium-high heat.
NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
If you've ever wondered why it is better to sear than to boil your steak or how to properly roast a luscious hunk of beef, then Alton Brown's new I'm Just Here for the Food is the book for you. It is less a book of recipes, although there are 80 of them, than a primer on the mechanics of cooking. But if the word primer makes you sigh at the thought of textbooks and science talk, think again. Brown, the host of the Food Network's Good Eats, is an amiable, amusing and sometimes irreverent guide to the subject of applying heat to food and coming up with dinner for your efforts.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 28, 2003
After partaking with abandon during the holidays, my husband and I vow to eat lightly in the first weeks of the new year. Even though we cannot bear the thought of multicourse meals, we still like to invite friends over. However, our post-holiday entertaining is on a much smaller and simpler scale. Soup and salad suppers are the answer. Typically, we invite two to four people to join us for a light menu that includes homemade soup, a big salad and a loaf of crusty French country bread.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 12, 1995
Here's a delicious thought: A new line of sorbets from Haagen-Dazs is all-natural, fat-free and dairy-free. The frozen desserts come in raspberry, strawberry, mango, zesty lemon and chocolate flavors. There are also snack bars in wild berry and chocolate. The sorbets have 120 calories (none from fat, and no saturated fat), no cholesterol and no sodium per serving. Suggested retail price is just under $3 for pints, and about $1.29 for bars. Nationwide distribution is under way, so look for the sorbets where Haagen-Dazs products are sold.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2006
Treat yourself and family with this colorful fall dinner. Salmon fillets are baked and topped with a black-olive-and-shallot sauce. It's served with black beans and orange carrots. The tastes and textures are a treat. Diane Goodman, Miami caterer and author of The Plated Heart, suggested this festive meal in a recent interview. It's full of flavor and fun and only takes a few minutes to make. The trick to cooking this salmon is to make sure the oven is at the right temperature before putting in the fish.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 13, 2006
On Mother's Days past, our son (assisted by his dad) liked to make breakfast for me. Following much clanging of pots and pans, I would be greeted by a smiling junior chef, proudly holding a tray loaded with breakfast. In those days, our child rarely ventured into the kitchen to cook. Mother's Day was the single exception. But now, a few decades later, he's a parent himself, and more than a little talented when it comes to cooking. In fact, he does most of the meal preparation for his young family, and loves celebrating special occasions with good food.
NEWS
By ROHINA PHADNIS and ROHINA PHADNIS,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
The mild sweetness of shallots and the fresh crunch of spring onions complement the arrival of warm weather and a season of rebirth. Spring onions are genetically identical to the common onion, says Wayne Mininger, executive vice president of the National Onion Association. But they look and taste different because they are planted very close together and harvested prematurely to give a milder flavor than a common onion, he says. Though spring and green onions are often used interchangeably, there is a difference between them.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 23, 2005
I love a good burger, but with its calorie and fat content, the classic American sandwich has become a rare indulgence. I do try to use the leanest ground meats for those times when the hankering becomes overwhelming. Recently, I looked through the cupboards and refrigerator for something to add more flavor to the lean meat. Shallots and garlic came to the rescue. Then I made a quick mustard-barbecue sauce to drizzle over the burgers. Serve these indulgences with lettuce and tomato, if you like, but you won't need any ketchup.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 8, 2004
It's become routine for me to respond to casual dinner invitations from good friends by offering to bring a homemade dish to the meal. I am not the only one. Lately I've noticed that more and more guests seem to arrive at informal gatherings with a contribution. It seems to be a trend -- one with a logical explanation. Most of our friends lead hectic lives trying to balance demanding jobs, children's schedules and community commitments with entertaining. Finding time to plan and cook an entire meal can seem like a Herculean task, but when others volunteer to bring part of the night's fare -- a salad, a side dish or a dessert, for example -- then the stress factor is reduced and playing host for a supper or dinner seems much more manageable.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 28, 2003
After partaking with abandon during the holidays, my husband and I vow to eat lightly in the first weeks of the new year. Even though we cannot bear the thought of multicourse meals, we still like to invite friends over. However, our post-holiday entertaining is on a much smaller and simpler scale. Soup and salad suppers are the answer. Typically, we invite two to four people to join us for a light menu that includes homemade soup, a big salad and a loaf of crusty French country bread.
FEATURES
By Melanie Barnard and Melanie Barnard,Eating Well magazine United Feature Syndicate | August 6, 1995
Lately I've been experimenting with kebabs that become main-course salads. In these streamlined recipes, the same fresh blends serve as a marinade for the grilled ingredients and a dressing for the salad. They work because of the juxtaposition of mellow and sharp flavors, tender and crunchy textures.Spicy Pork KebabsServes 41 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil1/4 cup chopped shallots (2 large shallots)1 tablespoon chili powder1 clove garlic, finely chopped1/2 teaspoon ground cumin1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper (cayenne)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Nine out of 10 times when planning a dinner party, I create a menu to serve at least six and often eight, reasoning that cooking for more rather than a few makes sense. I tell myself that the house still needs to be cleaned, the table set and flowers arranged, regardless of the number of guests. I have been reminded recently, though, of the virtues of inviting just two or three for a small, intimate meal. During the past year, my husband and I spent several months working in Paris in an apartment with a very small kitchen.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2003
Without fail at the end of each of my cooking classes, students raise their hands to ask about dishes that can be made in advance. Everyone, from restaurateurs to caterers to home cooks, loves food that can be completely prepared ahead with no last-minute kitchen angst. I certainly am among the legions who appreciate such recipes, especially when entertaining. And, of all the seasons of the year, summer lends itself best to make-ahead creations. Artichokes with a potato, bacon and chive filling, a recent addition to my repertoire, definitely fall into this category.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Nine out of 10 times when planning a dinner party, I create a menu to serve at least six and often eight, reasoning that cooking for more rather than a few makes sense. I tell myself that the house still needs to be cleaned, the table set and flowers arranged, regardless of the number of guests. I have been reminded recently, though, of the virtues of inviting just two or three for a small, intimate meal. During the past year, my husband and I spent several months working in Paris in an apartment with a very small kitchen.
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