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By Washington Bureau | August 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For the past three days, President Clinton's selection of Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the Polish-born officer who commands NATO and U.S. military forces in Europe, as the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has had news reporters and editors tripping over their tongues.The general's surname got mangled on the air and mispronounced in newspapers so often that military officials were scrambling to help reporters say it correctly. But then, many of them couldn't agree on a pronunciation either.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who guided U.S. military operations in Haiti and Bosnia, plans to retire from the military in September, a White House spokesman announced yesterday.By stepping down, the 60-year-old general is following other Joint Chiefs chairmen who left office after serving two two-year terms.White House spokesman Mike McCurry said President Clinton had not decided who will replace Shalikashvili or Gen. George Joulwan, NATO's supreme allied commander, who will retire in the spring.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili has been a veteran of war since he was 8 years old.A refugee from Poland who came to the United States at the age of 16, the man known affectionately as General Shali is no stranger either to the human dimensions or the high-stakes politics of combat.The 56-year-old Army general, who was nominated as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by President Clinton yesterday, is the son of a Georgian military officer who fled Poland at the start of World War II. The general has commanded combat divisions and led humanitarian missions, including the one that protected Iraq's Kurds from the vengeful wrath of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in 1991.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 1996
WASHINGTON - With the daily threat of land mines to U.S. soldiers in Bosnia having brought the issue home, Gen. John Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has ordered a review of the military's long-standing opposition to banning the use of land mines, which kill or maim more than 20,000 people a year, primarily civilians.In asking for the review last week during a meeting with the chiefs of the military services, General Shalikashvili said he was "inclined to eliminate all anti-personnel land mines," a senior Pentagon official said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who guided U.S. military operations in Haiti and Bosnia, plans to retire from the military in September, a White House spokesman announced yesterday.By stepping down, the 60-year-old general is following other Joint Chiefs chairmen who left office after serving two two-year terms.White House spokesman Mike McCurry said President Clinton had not decided who will replace Shalikashvili or Gen. George Joulwan, NATO's supreme allied commander, who will retire in the spring.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, yesterday defended the administration's pledge to deploy up to 25,000 U.S. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia, telling members of Congress that the force had to be large enough to avoid being "pushed around."General Shalikashvili said that if the warring parties in Bosnia negotiated a settlement, no more than half the NATO peacekeeping troops would be from the United States."It is very important that . . . they are robust enough to take care of themselves, and to ensure the freedom of movement so that they don't get pushed around like [the U.N. peacekeeping force]
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | August 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The father of Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was a Nazi collaborator in World War II who was rewarded with an officer's commission in the Waffen )) SS, the director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said yesterday.According to his unpublished memoirs, the late Dimitri Shalikashvili appears to have been so driven to fight the Communists who seized his Georgian homeland that he hoped working with the Nazis would help defeat a common enemy, Rabbi Marvin Hier said in a phone interview from the Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau | January 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Western alliance's military command will be ready with plans to enforce a no-fly zone against Serbian planes if there is a breakdown in the latest fragile move toward peace in Bosnia.Just before yesterday's report that Bosnian Serbs had acquiesced to a proposed peace plan, U.S. Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, commander of NATO forces, said he expected enforcing the no-fly zone would be the next move if talks in Geneva broke down.At breakfast with reporters, the general did not suggest that barring occasional Serbian planes from Bosnian air space would have military significance.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1994
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A senior Pakistani official charged yesterday that the U.S. military is leasing obsolete helicopters to the United Nations peacekeeping force the United States is leaving behind in Somalia, and he indicated to the visiting chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff that without better equipment, the entire mission could be jeopardized.In a news conference closing his 22-hour tour of U.S. and U.N. camps in the Somalian capital, Gen. John M. Shalikashvili said he would review Pakistan's request when he returned to Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 1996
WASHINGTON - With the daily threat of land mines to U.S. soldiers in Bosnia having brought the issue home, Gen. John Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has ordered a review of the military's long-standing opposition to banning the use of land mines, which kill or maim more than 20,000 people a year, primarily civilians.In asking for the review last week during a meeting with the chiefs of the military services, General Shalikashvili said he was "inclined to eliminate all anti-personnel land mines," a senior Pentagon official said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, yesterday defended the administration's pledge to deploy up to 25,000 U.S. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia, telling members of Congress that the force had to be large enough to avoid being "pushed around."General Shalikashvili said that if the warring parties in Bosnia negotiated a settlement, no more than half the NATO peacekeeping troops would be from the United States."It is very important that . . . they are robust enough to take care of themselves, and to ensure the freedom of movement so that they don't get pushed around like [the U.N. peacekeeping force]
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1994
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A senior Pakistani official charged yesterday that the U.S. military is leasing obsolete helicopters to the United Nations peacekeeping force the United States is leaving behind in Somalia, and he indicated to the visiting chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff that without better equipment, the entire mission could be jeopardized.In a news conference closing his 22-hour tour of U.S. and U.N. camps in the Somalian capital, Gen. John M. Shalikashvili said he would review Pakistan's request when he returned to Washington.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | August 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The father of Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was a Nazi collaborator in World War II who was rewarded with an officer's commission in the Waffen )) SS, the director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said yesterday.According to his unpublished memoirs, the late Dimitri Shalikashvili appears to have been so driven to fight the Communists who seized his Georgian homeland that he hoped working with the Nazis would help defeat a common enemy, Rabbi Marvin Hier said in a phone interview from the Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | August 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- For the past three days, President Clinton's selection of Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the Polish-born officer who commands NATO and U.S. military forces in Europe, as the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has had news reporters and editors tripping over their tongues.The general's surname got mangled on the air and mispronounced in newspapers so often that military officials were scrambling to help reporters say it correctly. But then, many of them couldn't agree on a pronunciation either.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili has been a veteran of war since he was 8 years old.A refugee from Poland who came to the United States at the age of 16, the man known affectionately as General Shali is no stranger either to the human dimensions or the high-stakes politics of combat.The 56-year-old Army general, who was nominated as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by President Clinton yesterday, is the son of a Georgian military officer who fled Poland at the start of World War II. The general has commanded combat divisions and led humanitarian missions, including the one that protected Iraq's Kurds from the vengeful wrath of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in 1991.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau | January 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Western alliance's military command will be ready with plans to enforce a no-fly zone against Serbian planes if there is a breakdown in the latest fragile move toward peace in Bosnia.Just before yesterday's report that Bosnian Serbs had acquiesced to a proposed peace plan, U.S. Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, commander of NATO forces, said he expected enforcing the no-fly zone would be the next move if talks in Geneva broke down.At breakfast with reporters, the general did not suggest that barring occasional Serbian planes from Bosnian air space would have military significance.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to be the top officer of the armed forces, gave strongsupport yesterday for sending 25,000 American troops to Bosnia to help enforce any peace settlement reached there, but said the overall operation would cost $4 billion in the first year alone.General Shalikashvili, a Polish-born artillery officer named to succeed Gen. Colin L. Powell as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee that a force of 50,000 heavily armed NATO troops would have a good chance of success in such a mission, if the proper command structure was established and the warring factions committed themselves to observe an agreement.
NEWS
August 13, 1993
President Clinton's choice of Gen. John Shalikashvili, now supreme allied commander in NATO, as the next chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff sends another signal to the Bosnian Serbs that the administration is getting tougher and may be on the verge of air strikes to end the "strangulation" of Sarajevo. His appointment came the same day Secretary of State Warren Christopher declared that saving the Bosnian capital would be "in the national interest," a goal he ignored only three weeks ago.The nation's current top officer, Gen. Colin Powell, has been notably reluctant to use force in the Balkans.
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