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February 11, 2011
If Del. Maggie MacIntosh wants to make sure the legislature "does it right" in determining if gas drilling by the hydraulic fracturing method is allowed in Maryland, she should heed the warnings given her committee by John Quigley in his testimony describing the wave of problems it is creating across Pennsylvania ( "Md. lawmakers warned of natural gas drilling woes in Pa.," Feb. 10). We know. We have a home there. Note, too, that Mr. Quigley describes chemically-laden gas that erupted in the Susquehanna River.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland regulators are weighing some of the strictest limits in the country on shale gas drilling, but a scientist Monday suggested they still may not go far enough to protect drinking water wells from contamination by methane leaking from drilling sites. Gas drilling rigs would generally have to be at least 2,000 feet from public or private water wells under rules being considered by the Maryland Department of the Environment, officials said Monday during a meeting of the governor's advisory commission on the issue.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 20, 2012
The House today passed legislation aimed at safeguarding western Maryland landowners from potential harm from drilling for natural gas in shale deposits in mountainous Garrett and Allegany counties. One bill,  HB1204 , would require the gas industry to finance the state's ongoing study of safety questions around the widely used but controversial drilling method known as hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking. "  Amid fierece debate over fracking's impact in other states, Gov.Martin O'Malleylast year ordered his administration to conduct a wide-ranging three-year review before approving any drilling permits - but state officials had said they lacked funding to carry it out.   By a vote of 88-49, delegates approved a one-time fee of $15 per acre on all new and existing drilling leases so the Maryland Department of the Environment could complete the study.  In deference to industry supporters who complain the delay in drilling is excessive, the fee was scaled back, and lawmakers directed the department to speed up its review, finishing in 2013 rather than 2014, as now called for under the governor's executive order.
NEWS
By Robert M. Summers and Joseph P. Gill | March 10, 2014
In 2011, Governor Martin O'Malley issued an executive order giving the state departments of the environment and of natural resources a clear directive: Determine whether and how natural gas production from the Marcellus Shale in Maryland can be realized without unacceptable risk to public health, safety, the environment and natural resources. The order established the Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative and instructed the agencies, in consultation with an advisory commission, to investigate and report back to the governor and the General Assembly.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
O'Malley administration officials told state lawmakers Wednesday that they need up to two years more to study the risks of drilling for natural gas in Marcellus shale deposits in Western Maryland before deciding whether to let the controversial practice go forward. Testifying before the House Environmental Matters Committee, Robert M. Summers, Maryland's acting secretary of the environment, said he and other administration officials plan a comprehensive evaluation of the potential health and environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to extract gas from shale layers far underground.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 3, 1991
CARLISLE, Pa. -- The Washington Redskins' punting duel ended almost before it had begun.The Redskins cut rookie punter Chris Shale yesterday and handed the punting job to Kelly Goodburn, who had been signed with four games left last season.Shale, a 10th-round draft choice who became the first Washington draft pick to be cut this year, was expected to push Goodburn in camp."What you want to see is two guys having a heck of a punting duel," said Wayne Sevier, the special teams coach of the Redskins.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 31, 1991
CARLISLE, Pa. -- The Washington Redskins were backed up on their 14-yard line in overtime in Detroit last November when Ralf Mojsiejenko went in to punt on fourth down.The Redskins were looking for a booming punt to get them out of trouble. Instead, Mojsiejenko kicked a 31-yarder that gave the Lions possession on the Redskins 45.Only a superb defensive stand saved the game, which the Redskins won on their next possession.But the Redskins didn't forget Mojsiejenko's 31-yard punt in the clutch.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
On December 14, 2005, JUDITH LEE "Judy" of Davidsonville, MD. Beloved wife of William L. Morse. Loving daughter of the late William and Opal Trickett Shale. Dear sister of Diane Harper, Brian Shale and the late Rocky Shale. A Memorial Service will be held at 10 A.M. on Monday, December 19, 2005, in the Hardesty Funeral Home, P.A., 905 Galesville Rd., Galesville, MD. Inurnment Lakemont Cemetery. Contributions are suggested to the Girls State Auxiliary Program of the American Legion.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
An Oklahoma-based energy company has applied for the first permits to drill for natural gas in Marcellus shale deposits in Western Maryland, the state Department of the Environment said Thursday. MDE spokesman Jay Apperson said state regulators are reviewing applications from Samson Resources Co. of Tulsa to drill at four sites in Garrett County. When the department determines that the applications are complete, the state will notify adjacent property owners and the public and invite comments and requests for a hearing.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 10, 2014
Seeking to highlight her green credentials in the race for governor, Del. Heather Mizeur took issue Friday with the environmental platform posted this week by the front-running ticket of Lt. Anthony Brown and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman. Mizeur's campaign issued a statement accusing Brown and Ulman of glossing over the dangers of hydraulic fracturing for natural gas and making "vague statements" about how to exploit the energy deposits in western Maryland without harming the environment or people's health.
NEWS
Donald C. Helm | October 31, 2013
Large-scale plans for hydraulic fracturing and natural gas export in Maryland have recently been set in motion. From my vantage point as a scientist, let me point to clear dangers in hydrofracking. A physical process occurs that is overlooked by methane gas developers. This overlooked process is the upward migration of fractures from depth. A breakthrough in understanding this physical process came with the publication of an award winning paper entitled "Hydraulic forces that play a role in generating fissures at depth" by D.C. Helm, published in the Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
In a recent commentary ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18), former presidential adviser Carol M. Browner praised Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposals to reduce carbon pollution. But she curiously left no mention of shale development, the only proven carbon reducing strategy that doesn't increase the size and power of government. The United States already leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, primarily due to our switch from burning coal to natural gas for electricity generation, according to the Paris-based International Energy Agency.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 24, 2013
A new study finds residential wells more likely to be contaminated when near drilling for natural gas using hydraulic fracturing. Researchers led by Duke University 's Robert Jackson report that although the vast majority of wells checked in northeastern Pennsylvania and southeastern New York had methane in them, those within one kilometer of gas drilling sites had six times more of the gas, on average, than residential wells farther away....
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
Times are good these days at the Linde Corp., where despite a sluggish economy nationally, the company is on a hiring binge. The construction company, based near Wilkes-Barre in northeastern Pennsylvania, has seen its workforce nearly triple over the past five years as it switched from helping to build big-box stores to laying miles of natural gas pipelines connecting hundreds of gas wells drilled in the rolling rural terrain here in Susquehanna County....
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
In a recent commentary ("Say yes to LNG," Nov. 13), Dan Ervin of Salisbury University correctly asserts recent industrial innovations in drilling technology - known generally as fracking - have led to an enormous surplus of natural gas in our domestic market. Resulting historic low gas prices benefit the consumer but challenge the profit margins of the energy industry. Mr. Ervin argues exporting LNG can raise the price of natural gas and therefore re-start high production rates, in the process creating jobs and revenue.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
A two-time All-Metro basketball player and a basketball coach nearing the 300-win mark headline inductees into the Howard County Women's Athletics Hall of Fame at Glenelg High School on Saturday. Rayna DuBose, a star at Oakland Mills and Virginia Tech whose hands and feet were amputated because of complications from meningococcal meningitis, and Teresa Waters, the River Hill coach who is in her 22nd year of coaching, are two of the four women who will be inducted. Former Atholton basketball coach Shirley Cohee and former Glenelg lacrosse standout Julie Stone Radnoff are the other honorees.
NEWS
January 1, 2013
A recent editorial accused the oil and natural gas industry of hoping "the next administration will be less protective of the environment and the health of Western Maryland's residents," a claim supported by zero evidence ("No study, no fracking," Dec. 27). Regulators from across the country have confirmed that developing natural gas from shale has not resulted in emissions levels that pose a threat to human health. Similarly, they note they have never once seen a confirmed case of hydraulic fracturing causing groundwater contamination.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
In a recent commentary ("Say yes to LNG," Nov. 13), Dan Ervin of Salisbury University correctly asserts recent industrial innovations in drilling technology - known generally as fracking - have led to an enormous surplus of natural gas in our domestic market. Resulting historic low gas prices benefit the consumer but challenge the profit margins of the energy industry. Mr. Ervin argues exporting LNG can raise the price of natural gas and therefore re-start high production rates, in the process creating jobs and revenue.
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