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EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
There's nothing like theater in the great outdoors. On second thought, make that theater in the great, unpredictable outdoors. For nine summers now, the actors from the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company have braved all sorts of conditions while staging their acclaimed "Shakespeare in the Ruins" productions at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park, which overlooks Historic Ellicott City. As the troupe gets ready to open two consecutive Shakespeare shows June 10 and 24, one fact emerges from their discussion of acting al fresco: expect the unexpected.
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NEWS
April 12, 2011
We come not to bury the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival, but to praise the outstanding job it did keeping the Bard's work alive for Baltimore audiences for 17 seasons. Parting is such sweet sorrow when the departed one has so entertained, educated and delighted local theatergoers for so long. The company announced last week it was closing due to financial troubles it had been experiencing for nearly a decade and that were exacerbated by the recent recession. Though there has always been an enthusiastic audience here for Shakespeare's enduring masterpieces, they have never been cheap to produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
The cash-strapped Baltimore Shakespeare Festival is closing its doors after 17 years in operation. The demise of the small troupe, effective immediately, reduces the number of the city's professional stage companies from three to just two: Center Stage and Everyman Theatre . "Everyone is devastated," Peter Toran, the president of the festival's board of directors, said Wednesday. "The decision to close was not made lightly by any means. I've known since I became board president almost two years ago that there were systemic budget issues that we needed to address.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Although just about everybody recognizes Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" as a supremely brilliant comedy, the embrace of his other plays is usually not quite so hearty. Those earlier works have been faulted for being a little too stuffily Victorian in subject matter and view of the sexes, too obvious or contrived of plot, too skimpy with wit. Well, if Wilde's creativity had ceased with "An Ideal Husband," which premiered in 1895 just a few weeks before "Earnest," and if every production of that work were as incisive as the one currently being offered by Washington's Shakespeare Theatre Company, the playwright's reputation would still rank high.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Just in time for Edgar Allan Poe's birthday on Wednesday, Hollywood filmmakers in Belgrade have wrapped an extravagant present. Last week, director James McTeigue, who guided Natalie Portman through "V for Vendetta," completed principal photography on "The Raven," a thriller starring John Cusack as Baltimore's classic yet still controversial man of letters. In this ambitious pastiche, set in the last five days of his life, Poe is more than a poet, critic and fiction writer. He becomes a detective seeking a serial killer who has designed his crimes to echo Poe's stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Given recent talk of "Second Amendment remedies" to advance certain political agendas, the kind of bloodthirsty, power-hungry machinations in Shakespeare's "Richard III" don't seem so terribly far removed from our own time. That point is underlined in the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's energetic updating of the epic play, where the man who would stop at nothing to be king makes his entrance at what looks like a political rally, camera crews hanging on his every insincere word.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
Of all the monarchs who came under Shakespeare's scrutiny and poetic license, Richard III may be the least likable — and most riveting. Like some evil version of the hobbling, stuttering Roman emperor Claudius, Richard was "cheated of feature by dissembling nature, deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time into this breathing world, scarce half made up. " Where Claudius was too shy to seek the throne and turned out to be a fairly decent...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The woman with gray hair piled high on her head perched on a stool in front of rows of college seniors scribbling notes. The students had many questions: How could recent graduates adhere to their values as they took their first jobs? Do leaders of other cities struggle with ethics as much as Baltimore's politicians do? And did Councilwoman Helen L. Holton believe she could restore faith in city government when charges were still pending against her in court? Two weeks after pleading no contest to a campaign finance violation, Holton addressed Loyola University students as part of a panel discussion, "Restoring Public Trust in City Hall.
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