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EXPLORE
July 12, 2011
Enjoy the live music, comedy and poetry of "As You Like It," a presentation of the Maryland Shakespeare Festival, under the stars, Fri., July 15, 7 p.m. on the grounds of Montpelier Mansion, 9652 Muirkirk Road. One of Shakespeare's best-loved comedies offers something for everyone: wrestlers, four weddings, a lion attack, girls in trousers and a couple of banishments. This performance will be interpreted for the hearing impaired. Bring a picnic and a blanket or chair for seating.
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EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 5, 2011
When the financially stressed Baltimore Shakespeare Festival recently ceased operations, it meant the end for its summer tradition of doing Shakespeare outdoors in the meadow at Evergreen Museum and Library in north Baltimore. Well, the tradition essentially continues, thanks to another Shakespeare-producing organization. The Frederick-based Maryland Shakespeare Festival has included Evergreen on its touring circuit this summer. Its festive production of “As You Like It” occupies the same spot on the Evergreen lawn as the Baltimore company claimed for so many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
Fireflies crisscross a meadow as an audience on lawn chairs and blankets takes in the fast-paced complications of "As You Like It" on the grounds of the Evergreen Museum and Library — a particularly apt setting for the Maryland Shakespeare Festival production. "We wondered if we should bring scenery, since this is perfect for the Forest of Arden, where the action takes place," said company artistic director John Bellomo. "Looking up at the stars and hearing this great poetry, it's like we're all in the woods together.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawatalkawata@patuxent.com | June 3, 2011
You might have seen her in the audience, drawing pad on her lap, pencil swiftly sketching the drama before her — King Lear going mad, witches chanting over a bubbling pot, dueling Capulets and Montagues, or a brooding Hamlet. For as long as the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has performed these classic plays in the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, local artist Mary Jo Tydlacka has captured the tragic and sometimes funny stories with her pencil and parlayed them into wildly colorful expressions worthy of the pathos of The Bard of Avon himself.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
There's nothing like theater in the great outdoors. On second thought, make that theater in the great, unpredictable outdoors. For nine summers now, the actors from the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company have braved all sorts of conditions while staging their acclaimed "Shakespeare in the Ruins" productions at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park, which overlooks Historic Ellicott City. As the troupe gets ready to open two consecutive Shakespeare shows June 10 and 24, one fact emerges from their discussion of acting al fresco: expect the unexpected.
NEWS
April 12, 2011
We come not to bury the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival, but to praise the outstanding job it did keeping the Bard's work alive for Baltimore audiences for 17 seasons. Parting is such sweet sorrow when the departed one has so entertained, educated and delighted local theatergoers for so long. The company announced last week it was closing due to financial troubles it had been experiencing for nearly a decade and that were exacerbated by the recent recession. Though there has always been an enthusiastic audience here for Shakespeare's enduring masterpieces, they have never been cheap to produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
The cash-strapped Baltimore Shakespeare Festival is closing its doors after 17 years in operation. The demise of the small troupe, effective immediately, reduces the number of the city's professional stage companies from three to just two: Center Stage and Everyman Theatre . "Everyone is devastated," Peter Toran, the president of the festival's board of directors, said Wednesday. "The decision to close was not made lightly by any means. I've known since I became board president almost two years ago that there were systemic budget issues that we needed to address.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Although just about everybody recognizes Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" as a supremely brilliant comedy, the embrace of his other plays is usually not quite so hearty. Those earlier works have been faulted for being a little too stuffily Victorian in subject matter and view of the sexes, too obvious or contrived of plot, too skimpy with wit. Well, if Wilde's creativity had ceased with "An Ideal Husband," which premiered in 1895 just a few weeks before "Earnest," and if every production of that work were as incisive as the one currently being offered by Washington's Shakespeare Theatre Company, the playwright's reputation would still rank high.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Just in time for Edgar Allan Poe's birthday on Wednesday, Hollywood filmmakers in Belgrade have wrapped an extravagant present. Last week, director James McTeigue, who guided Natalie Portman through "V for Vendetta," completed principal photography on "The Raven," a thriller starring John Cusack as Baltimore's classic yet still controversial man of letters. In this ambitious pastiche, set in the last five days of his life, Poe is more than a poet, critic and fiction writer. He becomes a detective seeking a serial killer who has designed his crimes to echo Poe's stories.
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