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FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 9, 2006
She's a nun who's convinced that all prayers are answered, but "sometimes the answer to our prayer is no." He's an accountant who finds himself acting in a play he's never rehearsed. These are the respective protagonists of Christopher Durang's 1981 double bill of one-act plays - Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You and The Actor's Nightmare, receiving a serviceable revival at the Vagabond Players under Barry Bach's direction. The plays are an interesting pairing. The nun thinks she knows everything; the accountant doesn't have a clue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2005
THEATER SEEING DOUBLE Brother will meet brother and East will meet West in the Shakespeare Theatre's production of The Comedy of Errors, opening at the Washington theater Sunday under the direction of Douglas C. Wager. For this play about two pairs of twin brothers separated at birth, designer Zack Brown has created a surrealistic set, inspired by Salvador Dali and M.C. Escher, and Middle Eastern costumes with Western touches. The production also has an original score, composed by Fabian Obispo, that blends traditional Middle Eastern music with modern trip hop. The cast is headed by Paul Whitthorne and Gregory Wooddell as one set of brothers, and Daniel Breaker and LeRoy McClain as their twin servants.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 8, 2005
Washington's Shakespeare Theatre Company has produced Othello three times in the past 15 years. What the theater hasn't done with Shakespeare's tale of racism, jealousy and betrayal is cast it traditionally - until now. In 1997, Othello was played by a white actor (Patrick Stewart) and the rest of the cast was black; in 1990, Othello and villainous Iago were both played by black actors (Avery Brooks and Andre Braugher, respectively). This time around, Brooks is reprising the title role, but as is standard modern practice, Iago is played by a white actor (Patrick Page)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 1, 2005
Actors such as Patrick Page, actors who portray the greatest villains in history and literature, walk a taut and treacherous tightrope. To convincingly portray a man as evil as Iago in Shakespeare's Othello, more is required than merely memorizing lines and showing up at rehearsals. More is required than boning up on the development and motivation of psychopaths, though Page has done all of that. More is required, even, than identifying and empathizing with this most cunning deceiver and betrayer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 2005
There's a traditional curtain at the front of the Shakespeare Theatre stage for its production of Oscar Wilde's Lady Windermere's Fan. Regional theaters - and this one in particular - rarely use these curtains anymore. But if the curtain has an antique feel, the themes in this 1892 play still strike a modern note. Maybe that's why this play has undergone a recent resurgence. Center Stage opened its season with a revival; the Shakespeare Theatre ends its season with another revival; and next month the play will launch the season at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2005
William Shakespeare will be one of the most celebrated dignitaries in the nation's capital when more than 20 organizations collaborate on a six-month, citywide Shakespeare in Washington festival in 2007. The festival, announced at the Folger Shakespeare Library yesterday, will run from January through June. Participants range from Washington institutions such as the Shakespeare Theatre, Washington National Opera and Kennedy Center to international companies such as the Kirov Ballet and the Royal Shakespeare Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 3, 2005
'Dog in the Manger' The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company will present the world premiere of a new verse translation of Dog in the Manger, a 17th century comedy by Lope de Vega, at the Howard County Center for the Arts tomorrow. One of more than 2,000 plays by the prolific writer known as the "Spanish Shakespeare," Dog in the Manger takes its title from an Aesop fable and focuses on a countess who falls in love with her male secretary, a man below her social station. The play attracted renewed attention when it was revived by the Royal Shakespeare Company last year.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 29, 2004
Brush up on your Shakespeare. When it comes to an intimate knowledge of bullying bosses, weasely co-workers and corporate skullduggery, the Donald can't hold a laser pointer to the Bard. It's true that Shakespeare's comedies, romances and tragedies are about other things, as well - lovers and fairies, murder and war - but the theme of power in all of its corrupting allure is at least an undercurrent in most of the playwright's works. And, of course, power is the main theme - perhaps the only theme - of NBC's The Apprentice.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 16, 2004
Shakespeare's Pericles is part fairy tale and part myth, and director Mary Zimmerman takes those characteristics and runs with them. Zimmerman's enchanting production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre treats this picaresque tale of treachery, tempests, love, loss, reunion and redemption like a fanciful children's story. She divides the narrator's role among many players, who read aloud from a book as if it were a child's storybook. She uses toy sailboats on sticks to represent a royal fleet.
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