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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | April 16, 2007
Murder, rape, dismemberment and cannibalism. The newest slasher flick at the multiplex? Or, the latest post-modern work by Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez? No, the man behind this particular gore fest is the greatest writer in the English language, and the work is Titus Andronicus. Titus Andronicus continues through May 20 at the Shakespeare Theatre Company, 450 Seventh St. N.W., Washington. $19-$76.25. 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.org.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2007
From Russia, with grace The music and motion of Eastern Europe come to the Lyric Opera House tomorrow when the Russian National Ballet Theatre and Orchestra take the stage for one night only. General Director Vladimir Moiseev, grandson of Russian ballet master Igor Moiseev and soloist with the Bolshoi Theater, heads the company of 55 dancers. Soloists, ages 17 to 25, have won numerous international accolades. The Russian National Ballet Theatre has performed worldwide and is currently touring the U.S. In the Baltimore leg of its tour, the company will perform to Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 11, 2007
In Richard III at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, everything is off kilter. The set, designed by Lee Savage, slants in one direction, and the floor slants in the other. As the duplicitous title character, Geraint Wyn Davies looks normal from one side and disfigured from the other -- clubfoot, withered arm, hunchback and a face in dire need of a Phantom of the Opera mask. RICHARD III / / Through March 18 at the Shakespeare Theatre, 450 7th St. N.W., Washington -- $19-$76.25. 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,[sun Theater Critic] | January 7, 2007
HARK! IN OLDEN TIMES, THE LEADER OF ONE OF the world's most powerful nations had a son, a mediocre student who partied far too heartily. As the years passed, the son grew up to assume his father's crown and, as head of state, became mired in a contested war. In this tale, written long ago, the son's name is Henry V, not George W. But with plot lines like this, is it any wonder that Washington, D.C., has had a long-standing love affair with Shakespeare?...
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,[sun theater critic] | November 26, 2006
George Farquhar ended his 1707 comedy, The Beaux' Stratagem, with a dance, but just about everything in director Michael Kahn's sprightly production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre seems to dance -- especially the scenery. 'THE BEAUX' STRATAGEM' / / Through Dec. 31 / / Shakespeare Theatre, 450 7th St. N.W., Washington / / 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.org
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2006
Verdi's `Nabucco' The lowdown -- To the uninitiated, Nabucco might sound like another Japanese puzzle, but to opera fans it means a stirring drama with music to match. Nabucco (the Italianized name for Nebuchadnezzar) was Guiseppe Verdi's first great hit. In addition to telling a tale of Babylonian captivity of the Hebrews, the opera conveyed a subtle political message that galvanized the composer's Italian public, a message about freedom from foreign domination. Baltimore Opera Company unveils a new production of Nabucco this week starring vibrant baritone Mark Rucker in the title role.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 9, 2006
It's surprising that the great filmmaker Frank Capra never made a movie of Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People. Like the title character in Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Ibsen's protagonist, Dr. Stockmann, takes on the political power structure. And like George Bailey in Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, Dr. Stockmann is -- at least initially -- concerned with the welfare of the people. But at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, with the exception of Joseph Urla's carefully nuanced Dr. Stockmann, most of the portrayals of Ibsen's characters come across merely as foils, lacking dimension or shading.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 14, 2006
The Fab Four and Shakespeare's Love's Labor's Lost. You might not see an immediate connection, but director Michael Kahn does, and he makes the most of it in his 1960s update of the courtly comedy at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre. Shakespeare's play is about three young noblemen who, with King Ferdinand of Navarre, vow to devote themselves to three years of study and forsake worldly indulgences, including the company of women. In Kahn's rendition, the three young men are members of a Beatles-like rock group.
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