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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1992
Washington-- When the Shakespeare Theatre produces "Much Ado About Nothing," much ado always seems to surround it.In 1985, the much ado concerned the announcement that the Folger Shakespeare Library was withdrawing its support of the 15-year-old theater. This time around, the much ado concerns the theater's spanking new facility in the Lansburgh building at 450 Seventh St. N.W.And though this latest production -- directed by Michael Kahn and starring Kelly McGillis -- is perfectly sound, it is justifiably overshadowed by the excitement of the new space, which, with fTC 447 seats, has nearly twice the capacity of the Folger.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2006
THEATER IBSEN'S 'ENEMY' Idealism, character assassination and political suicide are on the docket at the Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, where Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People opens the 2006-2007 season on Tuesday. Using a translation by Rick Davis (former associate artistic director of Center Stage) and Brian Johnston, the production is directed by Kjetil Bang-Hansen, resident director of Nationaltheatret in Oslo and author of a 1972 book on An Enemy of the People. Joseph Urla stars as idealistic Dr. Stockmann, who expects to be esteemed for his revelation that the local tourist baths are polluted.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 12, 1994
When artistic director Michael Kahn chose to include George Bernard Shaw's "The Doctor's Dilemma" in the Shakespeare Theatre's season, he was undoubtedly influenced by the ongoing national debate on health care reform.It's a debate Shaw would have relished. And indeed, many of his remarks in the play's lengthy preface, as well as in the play itself -- which opened at the Washington theater last night under Kahn's direction -- seem especially pertinent today."Until the medical profession becomes a body of men trained and paid by the country to keep the country in health it will remain what it is at present: a conspiracy to exploit popular credulity and human suffering," he wrote in the preface.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 10, 2004
In his book Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, critic Harold Bloom writes that, along with Hamlet, Falstaff is "superior to everyone else whom they, and we, encounter in their plays," and that this superiority is "most vitally ... a matter of personality." That vital characteristic - personality - is largely missing from actor Ted van Griethuysen's muted portrayal of the fat knight in Henry IV, Part 1 at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre. It's also largely missing from the rest of director Bill Alexander's bland production.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1992
Washington -- When the Shakespeare Theatre produces "Much Ado About Nothing," much ado always seems to surround it.In 1985, the much ado concerned the announcement that the Folger Shakespeare Library was withdrawing its support of the 15-year-old theater. This time around, the much ado concerns the theater's spanking new facility in the Lansburgh building at 450 Seventh St. N.W.And though this latest production -- directed by Michael Kahn and starring Kelly McGillis -- is perfectly sound, it is justifiably overshadowed by the excitement of the new space, which, with 447 seats, has nearly twice the capacity of the Folger.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | January 2, 1992
Good intentions that pave the way to hell doom the Maid, Jeanne d'Arc, to the burning fires of sanctimonious and political hypocrisy in George Bernard Shaw's masterpiece "Saint Joan," on stage at The Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger in Washington, D.C., through Jan. 26.Considered by many to be "the greatest play in English since Shakespeare," Shaw's impressive philosophical work combines the Irishman's ironic wit with powerful dramatic force. The central theme compellingly depicts the individual's cry for spiritual freedom that transcends the Church, the law, politics and the secular in the hopes of creating a better world.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- It's difficult to believe that until now, Shakespeare's political tragedy, "Coriolanus," has never been professionally produced in Washington, political hub of the nation.It can't be for lack of relevance. The play's commentary is timeless. An examination of military nobility vs. the common masses, it just happened to open at the Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger on the same day charges were dropped against former Marine Corps Lt. Col. Oliver L. North.Admittedly, when you see this production, you begin to understand why "Coriolanus" is one of Shakespeare's least produced plays.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Under a halo of popping flashbulbs, the capital's high society turned out in droves this week for the gala opening of the Harman Center for the Arts, which includes a new $89 million, glass-fronted auditorium that will be a new home for the Shakespeare Theatre Company. Each of the guests - who included Chelsea Clinton, with Secret Service agents in tow, and former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor - paid $5,000 to attend events that included a cocktail party; performances from, among others, Broadway star Patti LuPone and jazz virtuoso Wynton Marsalis; a fireworks display outside on F Street; and a banquet in the National Building Museum a couple of blocks away.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2005
William Shakespeare will be one of the most celebrated dignitaries in the nation's capital when more than 20 organizations collaborate on a six-month, citywide Shakespeare in Washington festival in 2007. The festival, announced at the Folger Shakespeare Library yesterday, will run from January through June. Participants range from Washington institutions such as the Shakespeare Theatre, Washington National Opera and Kennedy Center to international companies such as the Kirov Ballet and the Royal Shakespeare Company.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 5, 2001
There's ample justification for performing Sophocles' Oedipus cycle - Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone - in a single night (albeit in abridged form). The ancient Greeks used to see the plays in one fell swoop. Now modern audiences, whose attention spans are considerably shorter, can do so, too. Michael Kahn, director of The Oedipus Plays at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, is an old hand at abridged epics. In past seasons, he has directed one-night versions of both parts of Henry IV, all three parts of Henry VI, and shortened renditions of O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra and Ibsen's Peer Gynt.
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