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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 2, 1999
The Shakespearean masterpiece "King Lear" opens the season at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre on Tuesday. Company member Ted van Griethuysen stars as the tragic monarch, under Michael Kahn's direction.Portraying Lear's daughters, Regan and Goneril, are Jennifer Harmon and Baltimorean Tana Hicken. Monique Holt plays Cordelia, the youngest daughter. Holt, who is hearing-impaired, is signing her lines, which are spoken by Floyd King, the actor playing Lear's Fool."King Lear" is currently in previews.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 3, 1998
There's been a resurgence of interest in Oscar Wilde lately - from the off-Broadway hit "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde" to the Stephen Fry movie "Wilde." Not to be left out, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre is producing one of the playwright's less frequently revived comedies, "A Woman of No Importance," currently in previews and opening Tuesday.Under Michael Kahn's direction, designing woman Dixie Carter stars as Mrs. Arbuthnot, a woman with a secret. Most recently, Carter appeared on Broadway as Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's "Master Class."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 25, 1999
Avant-garde director JoAnne Akalaitis has staged Nicholas Rudall's new translation of Euripides' "The Trojan Women," now in previews at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre.Collaborating with the same design team -- set designer Paul Steinberg, lighting designer Jennifer Tipton and costume designer Doey Luthi -- she worked with on her recent New York production of "The Iphigenia Cycle," Akalaitis envisions Troy as a conglomeration of concentration camps, where the inmates wear gray prison garb and the stage is lighted by naked bulbs in cages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 21, 1999
Shakespeare's "King John" has never been produced in Washington (for that matter, it's hardly ever produced, period). Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, however, is making up for the oversight with a production directed by Michael Kahn, who has incorporated material from the anonymous play "The Troublesome Reign of John, King of England."Returning to the Shakespeare Theatre to play the title role is Philip Goodwin, who recently appeared on Broadway in the revival of "The Diary of Anne Frank."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 18, 2001
Washington's Shakespeare Theatre returns to the work of the 18th-century German writer Friedrich Schiller with "Don Carlos," currently in previews and opening Monday. Like Schiller's "Mary Stuart," which the theater produced a decade ago, "Don Carlos" is a historical drama. It's based on the tragic life of the son of King Philip II of Spain. Director Michael Kahn calls it a play as complex as the work of Shakespeare. Playing the title role is Robert Sella, who starred in "Angels in America" at the Mechanic Theatre and last appeared at the Shakespeare Theatre in "Mourning Becomes Electra."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | April 16, 2007
Murder, rape, dismemberment and cannibalism. The newest slasher flick at the multiplex? Or, the latest post-modern work by Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez? No, the man behind this particular gore fest is the greatest writer in the English language, and the work is Titus Andronicus. Titus Andronicus continues through May 20 at the Shakespeare Theatre Company, 450 Seventh St. N.W., Washington. $19-$76.25. 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2005
`Lorenzaccio' The intersection of -- or conflict between -- morality and politics is a theme that never seems dated, particularly in Washington. The Shakespeare Theatre is addressing that issue in John Strand's new translation of Alfred de Musset's 19th- century drama, Lorenzaccio. Set in 16th-century Florence, the play focuses on Lorenzo de Medici, cousin, friend and intended assassin of the infamous tyrant, Alessandro de Medici. Under Michael Kahn's direction, the Shakespeare Theatre's cast is headed by Jeffrey Carlson (whose Broadway credits include Edward Albee's The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 23, 2003
Ben Jonson's 1609 farce, The Silent Woman, was among the playwright's greatest hits. Both John Dryden and Samuel Taylor Coleridge used the word "perfect" to describe this satire of Jacobean society. But American audiences are largely unfamiliar with the work, which is receiving its first-known professional American production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, where it is currently in previews. Under Michael Kahn's direction, Ted van Griethuysen stars as Morose, an aging, noise-phobic bachelor who marries Epicoene (Ricki Robichaux)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 14, 1999
Two seasons ago in New York, a young director named Joe Calarco turned Shakespeare on his ear with a production called "Shakespeare's R&J." The unconventional staging re-envisioned "Romeo and Juliet" as a condensed play-within-a-play performed by four schoolboys at a repressive Catholic school. An unexpected hit, "R&J" happened to end with a quote from "A Midsummer Night's Dream."Now the inventive director is having a full-fledged go at "Midsummer," though once again, it's Shakespeare with a twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 7, 2002
Broadway audiences know her from her starring roles in such musicals as Contact (which won her a Tony Award) and Steel Pier. But now Karen Ziemba is branching out and making her professional Shakespearean debut in Much Ado About Nothing at the Shakespeare Theatre in Washington. Co-produced with Connecticut's Hartford Stage, the comedy is directed by that theater's former artistic director, Mark Lamos, who has set the action in the 1920s. Ziemba plays disdainful Beatrice opposite Dan Snook as the equally reluctant Benedick.
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