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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Baltimore's continually blossoming theater scene has another bud. Cohesion Theatre Company , to be based in the Highlandtown Arts and Culture District, will debut in November with a production of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus. " (Given the arrival of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, the Bard appears to be on a roll this season in Baltimore.) The Cohesion ensemble also plans to stage two Baltimore premieres: Tom Horan's "Thirteen Dead Husbands" in March, Anna Moench's "The Pillow Book" next summer.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 20, 1998
What better way to inaugurate a theater column than with a tribute to the greatest dramatist in the English language? William Shakespeare is believed to have been born 434 years ago this Thursday (he died on the same date -- April 23 -- 52 years later).So it seems an auspicious time to share the good news of the Royal Shakespeare Company's forthcoming residency at Washington's Kennedy Center. Fifty actors will perform nearly 100 roles in five plays (three by Shakespeare, one by Samuel Beckett and one by that prolific author, Anonymous)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
If the spirit of the Bard were to appear to the members of the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company in their terrific new home, he'd surely quote one of his lines from "The Tempest": "Be merry; you have cause. " There is abundant reason for high spirits during the venue's inaugural production, "A Midsummer Night's Dream. The troupe's downtown Baltimore theater, formed out of a handsome 19th-century bank building that deserved the makeover, is a lively place, visually and atmospherically.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996
In Shakespeare's day, all the roles were played by men. The Company of Women reverses that practice on Monday and Tuesdaywith an all-female production of the Bard's classic "King Lear" at Goucher College.Company co-founder Kristin Linklater, a theater professor at Boston's Emerson College who runs the company along with author and Harvard professor Carol Gilligan, will play Lear. 12-year-old girl will play the wise Fool. The production is directed by Maureen Shea, who is Emerson's theater director.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Emblazoned on Stevie Baggs' left trapezius in cursive letters is a distinctive tattoo: "Shakespeare. " It's safe to say there aren't many NFL linebackers nicknamed after the English poet and playwright. Signed by the Ravens over the weekend to a one-year, $390,000 contract with no signing bonus, the former Canadian Football League standout has proudly worn the sobriquet ever since his college days at Bethune-Cookman. "My fellow linebackers told me, 'Bro, you're making so many plays, I'm just going to call you Shakespeare,'" Baggs said.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 4, 2006, HELEN C. (nee Perrell) Shakespeare; beloved wife of the late Warren Shakespeare; devoted mother of Warren and Richard Shakespeare and Linda Bost; loving sister of Catherine Oden and Hilda Moxley of Frederick, MD. Also survived by two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday and Wednesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Thursday, 11 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | February 14, 2013
Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is following through on the Bard's famous statement that all the world is a stage. As if it weren't enough that this Ellicott City-based theater company already uses various Howard County sites for its indoor productions, it's moving ahead with its plan to convert a former bank building in downtown Baltimore into a new permanent home. When that new home opens in 2014, all of the company's indoor productions will be staged there. Its outdoor summer productions will continue to be done at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 10, 1997
If you missed the Reduced Shakespeare Company's performances in Washington a while back, you can find out what all the hilarity was about when Baltimore's own version of "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)" opens tomorrow at the Spotlighters Theatre.Performed by three actors (Kurt Herring, Craig Newell and Jim Markiewicz) in styles ranging from rap to Monty Python, the Spotlighters production is directed by Terry Long, whose previous Spotlighters spoofs have included "Psycho Beach Party" and "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 20, 1997
If you like your "As You Like It" dark and dangerous, then the production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre is the one for you.At least that's true of the first half, which ends with Oliver -- evil brother of the play's hero, Orlando -- hanging by his heels and covered with the fresh, bloody scars of torture.In his American debut, British director Laurence Boswell makes it easy to understand the appeal of the forest compared to the so-called civilized life in the court.This is as hard-edged an interpretation of Shakespeare's pastoral comedy as you're ever likely to see. Even the walls of designer Angela Davies' set are cold, gleaming chrome and the modern-dress costumes she has designed for the courtiers have a decided Germanic flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For the past 12 years, the name Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has been most associated with its outdoor productions in summer and fall, reached by trekking up a hill to the rustic ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. Audience seating typically involved folding chairs or blankets. This week, the company inaugurates a striking new home in downtown Baltimore that suggests a hip version of the famed Globe Theatre in London where Shakespeare's own company performed.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 1, 2014
Nobody asked me, but… A judge who orders an electric shock to silence a criminal defendant who refuses to shut up during a court proceeding has relinquished his eligibility for retirement duty on the bench. This is alleged to have happened when Charles County Circuit Judge Robert C. Nalley, who hit mandatory retirement a year ago, told a deputy sheriff to zap a chatterbox defendant with the "stun cuff" he was wearing at the time. (A few years ago, the same judge admitted to a Southern Maryland newspaper that he had deflated a tire of a car parked near the courthouse in La Plata.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
After three successful seasons, the Annapolis Shakespeare Company is completing its final production as a resident theater company at Bowie Playhouse with a fine production of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," continuing weekends through Aug. 17. Annapolis Shakespeare was founded in 2009 by Sally Boyett as a workshop group and quickly rose to become an accomplished performance company at Bowie Playhouse. Nevertheless, when the troupe made its Bowie debut in 2011 with "Twelfth Night," one could hardly have anticipated it outgrowing this venue in just three years.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 20, 2014
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company loves to take advantage of the natural setting provided for its summer shows at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park. "As You Like It" makes their job easy, because much of the play's action takes place in the Forest of Arden. Massive old trees play their natural role quite convincingly on this hill high above Ellicott City. Of course, the weather also plays a role in such outdoor productions. There was a 35-minute rain delay during the reviewed performance, but several of the actors performed contemporary pop songs while the audience huddled under a tent until the downpour ended.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
NEW YORK - The green shoes. That's what caught my eye as I sat down across from Kevin Spacey at the Regency Hotel last week and took a mental snapshot of his outfit before asking the first question. Neat, gray pinstriped suit, with a charcoal shirt open at the collar - and green shoes. And you know what? He made it work. Spacey looked great. Unlike many film and TV stars, though, Spacey's appeal is far more than skin-deep. As much style as he has, the artistic and intellectual substance of Kevin Spacey is what impresses most.
NEWS
April 12, 1998
It's been almost 10 years since theater students at Western Maryland College prepared a production of a William Shakespeare play."Twelfth Night," which opens at 8 p.m. Friday in Alumni Hall, is also a first for Professor Ron Miller, who came to WMC in 1987 and has never directed a Shakespeare play."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Not to put too fine a point on it, "The Importance of Being Earnest" is the greatest comedy in the English language. If you harbor any doubt about that, you might want to consider therapy. Better yet, just head to the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, where a first-rate production of Oscar Wilde's gleaming and subversive work should persuade you. Its namesake notwithstanding, the company frequently delves into other repertoire and has given welcome attention to Wilde over the years.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 21, 2013
The force is strong with these ones. The Baltimore Zoo has announced Friday the winners of a contest to name its two lion cubs. With more than 20,000 votes, the cubs will now be known as Luke and Leia -- after the heroes of the first three "Star Wars" movies -- beating out suggestions from "The Simpsons" and Shakespeare. The 10-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo's website reports: "They are both healthy and enjoy playing with one another.
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