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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | May 20, 1994
As "Shadowlands" played Sunday evening, unusual things happened at the intimate Colonial Players Theater just off State Circle in Annapolis.When the intermission lights came up, there was a collective "aw" uttered by an audience disappointed at having to let go of playwright William Nicholson's extraordinary characters, even for a little while. The "aw" was followed by a sustained round of intermission applause, also a Colonial Players rarity in my experience.And, as the story spun to its sad conclusion, I heard more sobbing, nose-blowing and tissue-rustling than in all my other visits to East Street combined.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the Sun | December 27, 2006
Laura Khoury's birthday is Dec. 23. She likes to do something extra-special for her big day so it doesn't just become part of the overall holiday festivities. This year, for her 10th birthday, Laura opted for a party at ShadowLand, the laser adventure center in Columbia. She had gone to ShadowLand for a friend's birthday party, she said, and had really enjoyed it, even though her team didn't win the laser tag game. "It was really fun," she said. "I was in last place, but I really liked it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 7, 1994
The success of "Shadowlands," which opens today at the Senator, is as inevitable as the coming of spring. It's got the world's most famous and beloved actor, it's physically beautiful, it's British in style and tone with a warm, plucky American heartThe success of "Shadowlands," which opens today at the Senator, is as inevitable as the coming of spring. It's got the world's most famous and beloved actor, it's physically beautiful, it's British in style and tone with a warm, plucky American heart, it's "life-affirming" while it watches a death, and it'll get most of its audiences blubbering wetly out into the night.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 3, 2005
In William Nicholson's play Shadowlands, when British writer and philosopher C.S. Lewis and American poet Joy Davidman Gresham meet for the second time, she asks if he's ever really been hurt. By the end of this affecting play, Lewis - best known as the author of The Chronicles of Narnia, including The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - has not only experienced greater hurt than ever before, he's also experienced romantic love for the first time. Under Suzanne Pratt's direction at Theatre Hopkins, Robert Riggs portrays Lewis' elation and suffering with genuine feeling and also with the subtlety that befits his character, a pensive man who was surprised by love in midlife.
FEATURES
By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1994
"It's good for you, Bill," says Debra Winger with a snap of her fingers to a radio reporter departing the room, complaining about how "Shadowlands" made him cry."Clear those ducts out," she says, still snapping. "You men don't cry enough."Ms. Winger, a single mother with a 7-year-old son, makes grown men cry.In the movie, she plays New Yorker Joy Gresham, who brought love to the life of English author C. S. Lewis during the '50s and then promptly was stricken with cancer. For Anthony Hopkins, playing yet another repressed Englishman, the dam finally breaks.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 3, 2005
In William Nicholson's play Shadowlands, when British writer and philosopher C.S. Lewis and American poet Joy Davidman Gresham meet for the second time, she asks if he's ever really been hurt. By the end of this affecting play, Lewis - best known as the author of The Chronicles of Narnia, including The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - has not only experienced greater hurt than ever before, he's also experienced romantic love for the first time. Under Suzanne Pratt's direction at Theatre Hopkins, Robert Riggs portrays Lewis' elation and suffering with genuine feeling and also with the subtlety that befits his character, a pensive man who was surprised by love in midlife.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 20, 1995
On broadcast TV, the only good fresh offerings come at the final hour of prime time, when two of TV's best shows go up against each another, as usual. Also "as usual" on Friday nights: There's a lot of action on cable.* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- This repeat of "The X-Files" is notable, in retrospect, for two lingering subtexts. One is that the conclusion of this episode -- about people in a small town beginning to act violently for no apparent reason -- is sufficiently open-ended to suggest that the story line may be revisited.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1994
In what is believed to be the biggest deal ever made with an actor, Savoy Pictures has agreed to pay Sylvester Stallone $20 million, or potentially an unprecedented percentage of total revenues, to star in a yet-to-be-determined movie in 1996.According to informed sources, the deal guarantees Mr. Stallone $20 million, or 20 percent of total receipts collected by Savoy from all media worldwide if those revenues exceed $100 million.Industry insiders say the agreement is staggering and could cause a domino effect in Hollywood, where today's biggest stars command $12 million-$15 million a picture against 15 percent of the distributor's receipts.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | January 30, 1994
Something is going on in today's movies. Or, more precisely, something is not going on.In "The Age of Innocence," Michelle Pfeiffer and Daniel Day-Lewis are riding in a carriage, their unspoken passion throbbing in cadence with the horse's hoofs. Suddenly, Mr. Day-Lewis does something shocking. He unbuttons Ms. Pfeiffer's tightly knit glove and kisses her wrist.In "Shadowlands," Anthony Hopkins and Debra Winger seek refuge from a rainstorm in an empty barn. They embrace, and she reaches under his sport coat to caress his back.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 20, 1994
Think of the 66th Annual Awards Presentation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as a Super Bowl game in which the final score -- which movie puts the biggest number after its name on Tuesday -- isn't that interesting, or even suspenseful. So, to enjoy it, you must key on how some of the smaller stories play out.There's not a lot of suspense about the outcome, though in the interest of preserving a modicum of suspense I'll hold the big awards till late in my prognostication, but some smaller dramas look interesting.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 20, 1995
On broadcast TV, the only good fresh offerings come at the final hour of prime time, when two of TV's best shows go up against each another, as usual. Also "as usual" on Friday nights: There's a lot of action on cable.* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- This repeat of "The X-Files" is notable, in retrospect, for two lingering subtexts. One is that the conclusion of this episode -- about people in a small town beginning to act violently for no apparent reason -- is sufficiently open-ended to suggest that the story line may be revisited.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1994
In what is believed to be the biggest deal ever made with an actor, Savoy Pictures has agreed to pay Sylvester Stallone $20 million, or potentially an unprecedented percentage of total revenues, to star in a yet-to-be-determined movie in 1996.According to informed sources, the deal guarantees Mr. Stallone $20 million, or 20 percent of total receipts collected by Savoy from all media worldwide if those revenues exceed $100 million.Industry insiders say the agreement is staggering and could cause a domino effect in Hollywood, where today's biggest stars command $12 million-$15 million a picture against 15 percent of the distributor's receipts.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | May 20, 1994
As "Shadowlands" played Sunday evening, unusual things happened at the intimate Colonial Players Theater just off State Circle in Annapolis.When the intermission lights came up, there was a collective "aw" uttered by an audience disappointed at having to let go of playwright William Nicholson's extraordinary characters, even for a little while. The "aw" was followed by a sustained round of intermission applause, also a Colonial Players rarity in my experience.And, as the story spun to its sad conclusion, I heard more sobbing, nose-blowing and tissue-rustling than in all my other visits to East Street combined.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 20, 1994
Think of the 66th Annual Awards Presentation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as a Super Bowl game in which the final score -- which movie puts the biggest number after its name on Tuesday -- isn't that interesting, or even suspenseful. So, to enjoy it, you must key on how some of the smaller stories play out.There's not a lot of suspense about the outcome, though in the interest of preserving a modicum of suspense I'll hold the big awards till late in my prognostication, but some smaller dramas look interesting.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | January 30, 1994
Something is going on in today's movies. Or, more precisely, something is not going on.In "The Age of Innocence," Michelle Pfeiffer and Daniel Day-Lewis are riding in a carriage, their unspoken passion throbbing in cadence with the horse's hoofs. Suddenly, Mr. Day-Lewis does something shocking. He unbuttons Ms. Pfeiffer's tightly knit glove and kisses her wrist.In "Shadowlands," Anthony Hopkins and Debra Winger seek refuge from a rainstorm in an empty barn. They embrace, and she reaches under his sport coat to caress his back.
FEATURES
By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1994
"It's good for you, Bill," says Debra Winger with a snap of her fingers to a radio reporter departing the room, complaining about how "Shadowlands" made him cry."Clear those ducts out," she says, still snapping. "You men don't cry enough."Ms. Winger, a single mother with a 7-year-old son, makes grown men cry.In the movie, she plays New Yorker Joy Gresham, who brought love to the life of English author C. S. Lewis during the '50s and then promptly was stricken with cancer. For Anthony Hopkins, playing yet another repressed Englishman, the dam finally breaks.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | August 24, 1993
"I think that God doesn't necessarily want us to be happy. He wants us to be lovable."These are some of the opening remarks spoken by actor Ken Ruta in the role of author C. S. Lewis in Olney Theatre's engrossing production of William Nicholson's "Shadowlands."And though Ruta's character is unaware of it at the time, his words encapsulate the journey Lewis takes in this dramatic account of the late British writer and theologian's marriage to the American poet, Joy Davidman Gresham.Expanded from its original form as a BBC teleplay, the stage play is as stunning intellectually as it is romantically, and it is receiving a splendidly restrained area premiere under Jim Petosa's direction.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the Sun | December 27, 2006
Laura Khoury's birthday is Dec. 23. She likes to do something extra-special for her big day so it doesn't just become part of the overall holiday festivities. This year, for her 10th birthday, Laura opted for a party at ShadowLand, the laser adventure center in Columbia. She had gone to ShadowLand for a friend's birthday party, she said, and had really enjoyed it, even though her team didn't win the laser tag game. "It was really fun," she said. "I was in last place, but I really liked it."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 7, 1994
The success of "Shadowlands," which opens today at the Senator, is as inevitable as the coming of spring. It's got the world's most famous and beloved actor, it's physically beautiful, it's British in style and tone with a warm, plucky American heartThe success of "Shadowlands," which opens today at the Senator, is as inevitable as the coming of spring. It's got the world's most famous and beloved actor, it's physically beautiful, it's British in style and tone with a warm, plucky American heart, it's "life-affirming" while it watches a death, and it'll get most of its audiences blubbering wetly out into the night.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | August 24, 1993
"I think that God doesn't necessarily want us to be happy. He wants us to be lovable."These are some of the opening remarks spoken by actor Ken Ruta in the role of author C. S. Lewis in Olney Theatre's engrossing production of William Nicholson's "Shadowlands."And though Ruta's character is unaware of it at the time, his words encapsulate the journey Lewis takes in this dramatic account of the late British writer and theologian's marriage to the American poet, Joy Davidman Gresham.Expanded from its original form as a BBC teleplay, the stage play is as stunning intellectually as it is romantically, and it is receiving a splendidly restrained area premiere under Jim Petosa's direction.
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