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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Question: On my young shade tree, two branches suddenly zoomed up that are taller than the rest. Should I cut them back to the same height as the others? Answer: Your tree has produced two leaders. Generally shade trees should have one dominant leader branch which is taller and stronger than all others. You want to encourage this leader to direct growth upwards. Choose your straightest, most vigorous, and best-positioned leader to retain. Prune the competing leader several inches shorter, so it does not out grow the leader.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
All of the leaves on some of my tomato plants have curled down, except a few twisted in all directions. They were growing great for a while. It looks contagious because they're all together. What is this? Tomato plants are like canaries in the coal mine when it comes to herbicide injury. They are super sensitive to the chemical 2,4-D and its family of growth-regulating herbicides, including clopyralid. Twisted growth is a classic symptom. Most likely an herbicide sprayed in your area was carried by wind and drifted onto the tomato plants.
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BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
We lost several shade trees in storms and hurricanes and need to replace them. What are some good fast-growing trees? How much should I fertilize for fastest growth? Good fast-growing trees can be an oxymoron when you're talking landscapes. A high percentage of trees that fall in high winds are fast growers, such as white pine, silver maple and black locust. Because they grow quickly, their wood tends to be weak and susceptible to breaking. These are still fine trees - excellent native trees, in fact - but think carefully before planting them close to your home.
BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
We lost several shade trees in storms and hurricanes and need to replace them. What are some good fast-growing trees? How much should I fertilize for fastest growth? Good fast-growing trees can be an oxymoron when you're talking landscapes. A high percentage of trees that fall in high winds are fast growers, such as white pine, silver maple and black locust. Because they grow quickly, their wood tends to be weak and susceptible to breaking. These are still fine trees - excellent native trees, in fact - but think carefully before planting them close to your home.
EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
I love trees. I have planted a baker's dozen since I returned to my family's home here in Roland Park. Dogwoods, cherries, hollies, Leyland cypress and a Japanese zelkova have now turned most of our garden into a shade garden. Some of the Leyland cypresses are looking scraggly. Generally, they are not long-lived trees. They grow fast and have problems fast. Heavy snows do damage, as do various diseases. It may be time to take them down and start over again. They are my trees of choice on the Cold Spring Lane side of our house.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
All of the leaves on some of my tomato plants have curled down, except a few twisted in all directions. They were growing great for a while. It looks contagious because they're all together. What is this? Tomato plants are like canaries in the coal mine when it comes to herbicide injury. They are super sensitive to the chemical 2,4-D and its family of growth-regulating herbicides, including clopyralid. Twisted growth is a classic symptom. Most likely an herbicide sprayed in your area was carried by wind and drifted onto the tomato plants.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
BEL AIR -- Whether you consider them ugly or beautiful, there's no doubt Paulownia trees are in demand -- at least among tree thieves.In the past four months, 15 Paulownia trees have been reported cut down and stolen in three separate incidents in Harford County, said Sgt. Robert Richick, an investigator with the county sheriff's office.He said just one Paulownia tree was reported cut down and stolen in 1989.Sergeant Richick said the trees are popular among poachers because they are highly prized in Japan, where their white, soft wood is used for everything from making musical instruments to ceremonial boxes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
We love a star: someone or something that stands out from the crowd. Which is why we love specimen trees, those singular punctuation marks in the landscape that draw our attention, appreciation and sometimes even awe. A specimen tree can be anything -- a crimson Japanese maple (Acer japonicum) at the beginning of a walkway, a tall Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) standing sentinel near a house, a flowering crabapple (Malus) dressed in frilly pink blooms in a shaded yard. But its star quality stems less from its particular characteristics than from the fact that it's a counterpoint to its surroundings.
NEWS
August 28, 2010
The problem: Why were the trees removed from McKeldin Square? The backstory: Given this summer's brutal temperatures, any scrap of shade seemed precious. That's why Washington Hill resident Joanne Stato contacted The Baltimore Sun to ask about the disappearing berms at McKeldin Square. A reader wrote to Watchdog to ask about the disappearing berms at the plaza, named after former Baltimore mayor and Maryland Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin. Stato bikes to work near the stadiums and noted that the shade trees in this area had been removed and that construction was continuing.
NEWS
November 7, 1999
Q. Two shade trees came down during Hurricane Floyd. I've never had to deal with stumps. Should I remove them to plant replacements in the same area?A. Yes, check with your neighbors or consult the phone book to find businesses that grind stumps. They can usually give you an estimate over the phone. It pays to be home during the grinding to help the operator spot the large, deep roots that extend 1 to 2 feet out from the base. All large roots should be ground. But don't pay extra to have the wood chips hauled away.
EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
I love trees. I have planted a baker's dozen since I returned to my family's home here in Roland Park. Dogwoods, cherries, hollies, Leyland cypress and a Japanese zelkova have now turned most of our garden into a shade garden. Some of the Leyland cypresses are looking scraggly. Generally, they are not long-lived trees. They grow fast and have problems fast. Heavy snows do damage, as do various diseases. It may be time to take them down and start over again. They are my trees of choice on the Cold Spring Lane side of our house.
NEWS
August 28, 2010
The problem: Why were the trees removed from McKeldin Square? The backstory: Given this summer's brutal temperatures, any scrap of shade seemed precious. That's why Washington Hill resident Joanne Stato contacted The Baltimore Sun to ask about the disappearing berms at McKeldin Square. A reader wrote to Watchdog to ask about the disappearing berms at the plaza, named after former Baltimore mayor and Maryland Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin. Stato bikes to work near the stadiums and noted that the shade trees in this area had been removed and that construction was continuing.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Question: On my young shade tree, two branches suddenly zoomed up that are taller than the rest. Should I cut them back to the same height as the others? Answer: Your tree has produced two leaders. Generally shade trees should have one dominant leader branch which is taller and stronger than all others. You want to encourage this leader to direct growth upwards. Choose your straightest, most vigorous, and best-positioned leader to retain. Prune the competing leader several inches shorter, so it does not out grow the leader.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
We love a star: someone or something that stands out from the crowd. Which is why we love specimen trees, those singular punctuation marks in the landscape that draw our attention, appreciation and sometimes even awe. A specimen tree can be anything -- a crimson Japanese maple (Acer japonicum) at the beginning of a walkway, a tall Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) standing sentinel near a house, a flowering crabapple (Malus) dressed in frilly pink blooms in a shaded yard. But its star quality stems less from its particular characteristics than from the fact that it's a counterpoint to its surroundings.
NEWS
November 7, 1999
Q. Two shade trees came down during Hurricane Floyd. I've never had to deal with stumps. Should I remove them to plant replacements in the same area?A. Yes, check with your neighbors or consult the phone book to find businesses that grind stumps. They can usually give you an estimate over the phone. It pays to be home during the grinding to help the operator spot the large, deep roots that extend 1 to 2 feet out from the base. All large roots should be ground. But don't pay extra to have the wood chips hauled away.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
BEL AIR -- Whether you consider them ugly or beautiful, there's no doubt Paulownia trees are in demand -- at least among tree thieves.In the past four months, 15 Paulownia trees have been reported cut down and stolen in three separate incidents in Harford County, said Sgt. Robert Richick, an investigator with the county sheriff's office.He said just one Paulownia tree was reported cut down and stolen in 1989.Sergeant Richick said the trees are popular among poachers because they are highly prized in Japan, where their white, soft wood is used for everything from making musical instruments to ceremonial boxes.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1993
THIET, Sudan -- They are always there. They wait, watching, patient. Every now and again they soar from the treetops in lazy flight, as an owner might amble about to inspect his property.They will get their fill, the vultures of southern Sudan. Death is the only ample harvest in this land. The weak ones -- animal or human -- fall in the dirt, and there is often no extra strength to cover them.The giant birds may seem to smile as the world turns away. No one wants to hear of more people starving in Africa.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
MIAMI -- A renaissance is under way on Biscayne Boulevard, the central artery of downtown Miami, where derelict motels and strip malls are being tenderly restored and scruffy neighborhoods are striving for cachet. But a defining element is about to vanish: the royal palm trees that have lined the street for decades, making clear that this is not Hartford, Conn., or Detroit, but the otherworldly tropics. Along several miles of the street, the tall, trim royals are being replaced with bushier live oaks, which planners say will provide much-needed shade and beautify the heavily traveled street.
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