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NEWS
June 17, 2013
You would probably have to over the age of 50 to remember when late May and early June meant shad in Maryland. In those days, the spawning season for American shad and river herring brought young and old to the banks of Maryland tributaries to catch their share of fish once so bountiful that they were shipped by the rail car load from Crisfield to Baltimore. Shad filet and shad roe were as big a part of the Chesapeake Bay's seafood bounty as anything on the plate today. They fed the American colonists all along the East Coast.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' recommendation for a one-year moratorium on the crab harvest is correct ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). The members of the Maryland General have a history of not showing courage when faced with the facts. It took them several sessions to really put "teeth" into the laws on seat belts and with laws restricting cell phone use while driving. When it became apparent that the shad population was in danger, they finally took action, and in a couple of years the shad run was again in full swing.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 19, 2013
There's new help on the way for what used to be the Chesapeake Bay's most important fish, though how much good it will do remains to be seen. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has enacted a first-ever cap on how many American shad and related fish that ocean-going fishing trawlers can catch by accident when going after other species such as Spanish Atlantic mackerel. Shad once thronged the Chesapeake every spring when they made their spawning runs up the bay's rivers from the Atlantic Ocean, but centuries of overfishing, pollution and habitat loss from construction of dams and other obstructions depleted them to the point that Maryland closed its fishery for them in 1980.
NEWS
BY SHAD ROE | September 4, 2013
By the time you read this, the elite young athletes that make up Harford County's football squads will be pacing around the locker room, strapping on their pads, and getting themselves psyched for the 2013 campaign. I, for one, could not be happier. Yes, the summer went quickly for your favorite pigskin prognosticator, but, as I've often said, June, July and August are just preludes to football season. I think there's some sport involving bats that gets played during that time, but I forget what it's called.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | March 21, 2013
Editor: I enjoyed [Jim Kennedy's recent column]. I grew up in Richmond, Va., and shad roe in the Spring was a big deal. I will admit that was 35 years ago. Each spring many local restaurants advertised "Specials on Shad roe. " Almost any way you could think of was a good idea. I personally enjoyed roe with scrambled eggs for breakfast. Sautéed roe for lunch or dinner was also very good. The local grocery stores advertised roe in their ads. We even had a local canner, "Tidewater," offer canned roe that made it available seasonable.
NEWS
November 30, 2008
On November 27, 2008, MELVIN J. MACNEAL "SHAD". Survived by his wife, Inge Macneal ; two son's, John and Dennis; grandson's, Thomas and Stephen, three great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Services are private.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1991
In the Susquehanna River above the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, thousands of little American shad fingerlings are spilling through a sluiceway over York Haven Dam. They are clearing their first hurdle in a 300-mile odyssey that will take them down the Chesapeake Bay to the Atlantic Ocean.After roaming the coast from Newfoundland to North Carolina for three or four years, these young shad will swim back toward the bay one February, seeking to spawn in the river where they spent the first few months of life.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | April 3, 1993
Can fish just get lost; hang a wrong turn migrating to the bay and never show up?The late Irving Crouch of Rock Hall, who fished the Chesapeake for 70 years, could recall a year in the 1920s when he fished hard all winter for striped bass and caught exactly one. This was a fisherman who used miles of net and ranged the whole bay. The years before and after that, his catches were measured by tons.John Edward Goslee, a boat builder and fisherman on the Eastern Shore, thinks the bay's hardhead, or croaker, once ended up on the wrong side of the Atlantic ocean.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 7, 1993
It was spring and I wanted to enjoy some shad. I tried three times. I baked it at home, first in a bath of olive oil and lemon juice, then with bread crumbs. I didn't like it. In both cases the fish flavor was too strong for me.This was disappointing.Eating a plate of springtime shad was one of the Baltimore traditions I had wanted to appreciate. Over the years the popularity of the custom has diminished as spawning shad have all but disappeared from Maryland waters. Now, dinner-table shad have to be "imported" from other East Coast states whose river systems support a healthy shad run.There also seems to be a diminishing supply of shad eaters.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
"POOR SHAD, where is thy redress?" That lament came in 1849 from Henry David Thoreau, dismayed at the dams that were systematically amputating one of the North American springtime's great enthusiasms. From earliest Colonial times, nothing symbolized nature's bounty in April, May and June more than countless legions of fat, silver shad returning from the oceans, penetrating coastal rivers as far as free-flowing water would permit. It was likely that shad spawning in the Potomac near Washington in 1607 caused Captain John Smith to marvel about fish so thick that his crew attempted to dip them with a frying pan, according to author John McPhee.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 19, 2013
There's new help on the way for what used to be the Chesapeake Bay's most important fish, though how much good it will do remains to be seen. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has enacted a first-ever cap on how many American shad and related fish that ocean-going fishing trawlers can catch by accident when going after other species such as Spanish Atlantic mackerel. Shad once thronged the Chesapeake every spring when they made their spawning runs up the bay's rivers from the Atlantic Ocean, but centuries of overfishing, pollution and habitat loss from construction of dams and other obstructions depleted them to the point that Maryland closed its fishery for them in 1980.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
You would probably have to over the age of 50 to remember when late May and early June meant shad in Maryland. In those days, the spawning season for American shad and river herring brought young and old to the banks of Maryland tributaries to catch their share of fish once so bountiful that they were shipped by the rail car load from Crisfield to Baltimore. Shad filet and shad roe were as big a part of the Chesapeake Bay's seafood bounty as anything on the plate today. They fed the American colonists all along the East Coast.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | March 21, 2013
Editor: I enjoyed [Jim Kennedy's recent column]. I grew up in Richmond, Va., and shad roe in the Spring was a big deal. I will admit that was 35 years ago. Each spring many local restaurants advertised "Specials on Shad roe. " Almost any way you could think of was a good idea. I personally enjoyed roe with scrambled eggs for breakfast. Sautéed roe for lunch or dinner was also very good. The local grocery stores advertised roe in their ads. We even had a local canner, "Tidewater," offer canned roe that made it available seasonable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Wanda Reynolds from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for baked shad. She remembered seeing a recipe for making the fish some years ago in a local newspaper. She thought the recipe called for a long baking time that helped soften the bones. Pamela Green from Arnold sent in a recipe that she says she found in either The Washington Post or the Capital in Annapolis in the 1980s that calls for wrapping the fish in foil and baking it for six hours at a very low temperature.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Capt. Herbert Hamilton Ward III, a retired career naval officer who was active in Upper Chesapeake Bay environmental matters and other issues, died March 17 from complications of a blood clot at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The Broadmead retirement community resident was 91. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Herbert Hamilton Ward III was born and raised in Wilmington, Del., where he graduated in 1939 from Friends School. He was a member of an accelerated wartime class at the Naval Academy, from which he graduated in 1943.
EXPLORE
November 22, 2011
First of all, I'd like to congratulate the Aberdeen Eagles for proving me wrong last week. I had them being beaten by North Harford in the 3A North title game, but the Eagles battled back to top the Hawks 38-20, avenging a regular-season loss to North Harford, and securing a spot in their first state semifinal since 2003, when they won the 2A state championship. In case you forgot, Aberdeen was 1-9 last season, so this season's turnaround is one of the best I can bring to mind. The other team left alive, Perryville, is still riding its glorious unbeaten streak, now at 12 games, after topping Cambridge-South Dorchester in the 1A East final, and earning a trip to its first ever state semifinal.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 24, 2002
THE WAY the wind currents work in our house, you can sniff out what's cooking as soon as you walk in the door. Zephyrs from the kitchen stove speed toward the front of the house, and some nights the fragrance of freshly baked bread or a roasted chicken welcomes me home. But one recent night the scent that greeted me was not pleasant. It was the rough, acrid odor of fish. I hurried toward the kitchen to turn on the exhaust fan and tried to figure out which species was causing the smell.
NEWS
By Gary Diamond | April 12, 1992
In 1980, the Susquehanna River's shad population dipped to an all-time low of 5,500 adult fish, but today things are looking up for the shad.Current population is estimated at 145,000.In an attempt to stem the decline, Maryland's Department of Natural Resources enacted a moratorium, prohibiting commercial and recreational harvests of shad in the bay and its tributaries. Although millions of young shad are stocked annually, the effects were not obvious until 1985."We're annually stocking 5 million American shad fry below Conowingo Dam and several million are also stocked upstream in the Juniata River," said biologist Richard St. Pierre of U.S. Fish andWildlife Service.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
Three losses last week? That doesn't sound like me, but, alas, it was me that made those picks. Now, with just tonight's games left before the playoffs begin, I've only got one shot at a perfect week of regular-season predictions. Here's what I see happening: Aberdeen at Fallston. The game of the week, kids. Undefeated Fallston proved its mettle last week with a big victory over North Harford, and Aberdeen pumped its record up to 7-2 by knocking the tar out of CMW. I'm betting there's going to be a whole bunch of points scored in this one. The pick: Fallston wins, 42-35.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
Were it not for those Bel Air Bobcats getting their rear ends handed to them by New Town last week, I would have had my first perfect week of the season. It's getting desperate here, as I've only got a few more weeks left before the playoffs roll around. Hopefully my week-nine picks will be flawless. Here's how I see everything shaking out: Aberdeen at C. Milton Wright. The Eagles proved me right by winning the big game against Havre de Grace last week, and I don't see them having any trouble getting past the Mustangs.
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