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By Arthur J. Magida | April 20, 2008
When I first met Aichana while doing research in Africa, the heat from the Sahara that was sweeping through Mauritania's capital had made it so difficult to sleep indoors that she had thrown a mattress on the terrace of a friend's home. Aichana's dark skin blended easily into the night. The blue scarf she'd wrapped around her long hair was about the only bright spot coming from the shadows. Everything else about her faded into the blackness of the evening. I'd never met anyone like Aichana.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Maryland lawmakers are poised to outlaw the shackling of pregnant inmates. The proposed law would make it illegal to shackle incarcerated women while they are in labor, delivery and recovering from giving birth. While legislative analysts said most jails and prisons in Maryland already advise against using waist restraints and unnecessary confinement for pregnant women, the bill makes clear that it is illegal and spells out the narrow circumstances under which pregnant women can be shackled.
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NEWS
February 18, 1997
PUTTING prisoners to work should be a fundamental objective of prison officials. The benefits are manifold. But not if this entails shackling the prisoners together in a scene straight out of slavery days.And yet that is what muddled-thinking commissioners in Queen Anne's County intend under the guise of making jailed inmates productive. Not only do the commissioners want inmates to pick up trash along highways and embark on other work details, but they insist prisoners do so while chained together.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | April 20, 2008
When I first met Aichana while doing research in Africa, the heat from the Sahara that was sweeping through Mauritania's capital had made it so difficult to sleep indoors that she had thrown a mattress on the terrace of a friend's home. Aichana's dark skin blended easily into the night. The blue scarf she'd wrapped around her long hair was about the only bright spot coming from the shadows. Everything else about her faded into the blackness of the evening. I'd never met anyone like Aichana.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
A prisoner in Montgomery County, facing a possible 15-year sentence for felony theft, was unshackled and uncuffed by order of Circuit Judge DeLawrence Beard, who allowed him to marry in a civil ceremony in the courthouse yesterday.The man, Nicholas Stanford Redman, 27, of Columbia was then allowed to change from his prison garb and don a suit and tie before being taken to the ceremonial room to be wed.His bride, Sharon Louise Gray, 32, also from Columbia, was allowed only one brief kiss with her new husband before he was led away by sheriff's deputies, again in shackles and handcuffs for incarceration.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
A man who represented himself and was convicted in September of murdering his girlfriend lost a bid for another trial in Howard Circuit Court yesterday.Marvin Philander Smith of Baltimore cited his lack of knowledge in practicing law and understanding courtroom procedures as one of several reasons why he should be given a new trial.But Judge Raymond Kane Jr. didn't buy Smith's argument. He denied Smith's request for another trial and scheduled his sentencing hearing for Dec. 20."I'm satisfied it was appropriate for Mr. Smith to proceed with the trial without counsel," Judge Kane said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
His hair had been dyed and he was no longer wearing shackles and handcuffs, but Howard County police found escapee J.C. Porter in a West Virginia motel Tuesday night, authorities said yesterday. Porter ran barefoot from security guards the evening of Aug. 20 while he was at Howard County District Court in Ellicott City to see a bail commissioner. He fled the building and into a wooded area north of the court building, police said. Authorities used police dogs to search the area until nightfall.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 27, 1994
William Donald Schaefer, taking one of an endless series of bows as he makes his exit from the political stage, received an especially effusive introduction at the Better Business Bureau's annual luncheon the other day. Schaefer, said Alvin Levi, will be "remembered as the greatest mayor in the city's history and the greatest governor in Maryland's history." Don Donaldo then spoke, relating again how various people and regions of the state, especially the Eastern Shore, haven't appreciated his efforts.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Lianne Hart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
TULIA, Texas - They stood dazed in the parking lot of the Swisher County courthouse, 12 men and women in a sea of well-wishers, freed from prison yesterday after serving four years on drug convictions that stemmed from the uncorroborated testimony of a discredited undercover officer. "I just want justice, and to move on with my life," said Kizzie White, 26. "I'm so happy to be with my family and grateful this is almost over." White was one of 46 Tulia residents, 39 of them black, who were arrested in a 1999 pre-dawn drug raid in this tiny farming community in the Texas panhandle.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | June 21, 1995
Unnoticed by the public and mostly unreported by a press and television besotted with the sound-bite fun of the budget story, a radical rewrite of telecommunications law is now under way in Congress. The immediate result, reports the New York Times. is likely to be "chaos." But then -- ah! --benefits galore. I AM BRACING for another of those great leaps forward that happen when we shake off the shackles of the past. Believe me, braced is the position to be in when these great leaps occur.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | February 9, 2008
They were savvy kids, but some were surprised by the shackles. When a group of correctional officers visited a Southwest Baltimore elementary school yesterday to deliver some real-life lessons, few students were prepared for the sight of Clinton Brinkley, the father of a fellow student, shuffling across the classroom floor, his legs shackled, his wrists cuffed and bound by a chain around his waist. "You don't want to be in this position," said Brinkley, 40, who had gamely volunteered for the indignity of the moment but for whom such confinement was not unfamiliar.
NEWS
By Henry Chu | November 15, 2007
LAHORE, Pakistan -- Leaders of this country's fractured political opposition began taking the first steps yesterday toward uniting against President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who is facing widespread dissent after more than a week of emergency rule. But the difficulties of overcoming internal divisions and the rigors of de facto martial law were quickly made clear during the arrest of one of Pakistan's most famous public figures, cricketer-turned-opposition politician Imran Khan, at an anti-Musharraf student rally here that broke into factional fighting.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | August 7, 2007
A convicted armed robber slipped out of his leg shackles yesterday and fled from a downtown Baltimore courthouse, the second time in a year that he has escaped from custody. Marvin Ray Jordan, 24, was being loaded with five others into a prison van in the underground parking garage of Courthouse East about 12:45 p.m. when he dodged three correctional officers and ran south on Guilford Avenue, a Division of Correction spokesman said. Jordan is serving a four-year sentence for a January 2006 armed robbery conviction.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 2, 2007
I could be wrong, but I'm having a hard time believing that Brandon T. Morris was smart enough to see that if he tried to escape from the Howard County circuit court building, then his trial would be postponed. But that's what's happened. Yesterday, Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney told Washington County prosecutors and Morris' defense attorneys that, in the next several weeks, he would issue his ruling on whether he should continue to preside over the case. That information comes from Washington County Deputy State's Attorney Joseph S. Michael, who was to be the prosecutor at Morris' trial.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | August 8, 2005
ATLANTA - Whatever happened to good old American know-how? What became of those twin emblems of our national character - ingenuity and resourcefulness? The nation could use a bit of those right now. Even as global petroleum reserves peak, we have no national program for developing alternative energy sources, NASA's shuttle program has been suspended indefinitely for fear of another disaster, and other nations are outstripping us in vital genetic research. The Pentagon is so desperate to attract a new generation of scientists and engineers that it is sending midcareer researchers to screenwriting school, hoping they'll write movies depicting scientists as flashy heroes.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
A Baltimore police officer was convicted yesterday of misdemeanor assault and misconduct charges stemming from an accusation last year that he hit a handcuffed teenager in the face with a metal baton. Officer Gregory M. Mussmacher faces up to 10 years in prison on the second-degree assault conviction. There are no sentencing guidelines for misconduct. Circuit Judge Allen L. Schwait acquitted Mussmacher of other misconduct and assault charges, including felony assault. Mussmacher, 30, who had worked as a Northwest District officer, had been suspended without pay before the trial.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | February 9, 2008
They were savvy kids, but some were surprised by the shackles. When a group of correctional officers visited a Southwest Baltimore elementary school yesterday to deliver some real-life lessons, few students were prepared for the sight of Clinton Brinkley, the father of a fellow student, shuffling across the classroom floor, his legs shackled, his wrists cuffed and bound by a chain around his waist. "You don't want to be in this position," said Brinkley, 40, who had gamely volunteered for the indignity of the moment but for whom such confinement was not unfamiliar.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | August 4, 1991
There's an old story about the time the Lone Ranger and his faithful Indian sidekick Tonto found themselves surrounded by hundreds of hostile Indians."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Sun Staff | September 20, 2004
In validating their preseason billing as title contenders, the Ravens followed a familiar script: a swarming defense and a staggering running attack. What they could have done without was the theatrics. The Ravens' 30-13 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers before 69,859 at M&T Bank Stadium yesterday was cluttered with embarrassing penalties and painful injuries. Moments after recording their largest margin of victory in this fierce AFC North rivalry, the Ravens (1-1) could only scratch their heads.
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