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Seymour Hersh

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NEWS
By Richard Reeves | November 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary puts us in our place. The definition of ''journalism'' begins: ''The occupation of reporting, writing, editing . . . '' The sample sentence there reads: ''He calls himself a historian, but his books are mere journalism.''If they had asked me, I would have said that journalism is a self-created tribe. The best thing about my business is that you become a reporter by saying you are one. This is no profession; there are no licenses, no entrance examination, no written standards, no review boards, no required education.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 5, 2004
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's lofty crusade for freedom and democracy in Iraq, and indeed the whole Middle East, is being sabotaged by a few graphic photos from one of Saddam Hussein's old torture chambers near Baghdad. At precisely a time when the occupation of Iraq has been turning more bloody and troublesome, the surfacing of those snapshots of shocking prisoner abuses at the hands of U.S. captors is delivering a devastating blow to America's dwindling image as a moral force. Global airwaves are full of condemnations that the U.S.-led force that went into Iraq to free its people of the barbarities of Mr. Hussein is now guilty of the same kinds of brutalities -- in, no less, the same place.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 14, 1997
The price of a dime phone call will go from 25 to 35 cents.U.N. members are showing the same unanimous resolve toward Iraq displayed previously with respect to Bosnia.Don't look now, but the U.S. is in a blood feud with a murderous little band in Pakistan -- an awkward position for a great power to find itself in.Seymour Hersh could be the Kitty Kelley of the American monarchy.Pub Date: 11/14/97
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
At 9:15 a.m. Sept. 11, Seymour Hersh got a telephone call from David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker magazine. Along with the rest of America, both were transfixed by the televised horror of the World Trade Center in flames. "The second tower had been hit, but the first tower hadn't fallen yet," Hersh recalls. "He said, `You're not doing anything else for the next year.' I said, `Of course.'" Thus was the indefatigable Sy Hersh launched on the biggest story of our time. Because Hersh has been astonishing people with his stories since he broke the news of the massacre by U.S. troops at My Lai during the Vietnam War, there was reason to believe he would unearth something interesting.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
NSA's monthly news-letters - which still contain a warning that copies "should be destroyed as soon as they are read" - give a glimpse of the agency's unique culture. Some excerpts:October 1960:Learn more about the communist conspiracyThe following books are among the thirty-five recently placed on the Security Bookshelf: Pattern for World Revolution, Ypsilon; My Retreat from Russia, Petrov; I Chose Freedom, Kravchenko. ... One hundred volumes covering the Communist plan and its operation throughout the world now are available.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 5, 2004
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's lofty crusade for freedom and democracy in Iraq, and indeed the whole Middle East, is being sabotaged by a few graphic photos from one of Saddam Hussein's old torture chambers near Baghdad. At precisely a time when the occupation of Iraq has been turning more bloody and troublesome, the surfacing of those snapshots of shocking prisoner abuses at the hands of U.S. captors is delivering a devastating blow to America's dwindling image as a moral force. Global airwaves are full of condemnations that the U.S.-led force that went into Iraq to free its people of the barbarities of Mr. Hussein is now guilty of the same kinds of brutalities -- in, no less, the same place.
FEATURES
By Michael Prager and Michael Prager,BOSTON GLOBE | October 19, 1997
It is grand to have illusions, until you find out they're illusions. That disheartening lesson comes in the November Vanity Fair, in Robert Sam Anson's report on Seymour Hersh's coming book on the Kennedys.Hersh burst into prominence in the late '60s when he revealed the massacre at My Lai, and it was only the first in an explosion of exposes: the secret bombing of North Vietnam, then of Cambodia; domestic spying by the CIA; the wiretapping of Kissinger's aides.Sy Hersh seemed to be someone to emulate.
NEWS
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1997
Despite a small number of books criticizing President John F. Kennedy since his assassination, many continue to think of him as an unblemished paragon - a glamorous, intelligent, hard-working chief executive. They like the image of Camelot perpetuated by Kennedy partisans.At least some Americans want the truth about their presidents, though, even when comfortable myths are shattered. That is where Seymour Hersh comes in. His book, "The Dark Side of Camelot" (Little, Brown, 498 pages, $26.95)
FEATURES
By SUSAN BAER and SUSAN BAER,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- This is no book tour.Seymour M. Hersh blows into the hotel lobby like a cyclone in a suit and declares: "I'm in a war."At the end of week one of what he calls "pimping away" -- traveling around the country to promote his controversial and much-maligned new book on John F. Kennedy -- the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist has arrived for an interview armed and combat-ready.His briefcase is stuffed with documents to back up the many sensational and devastating charges he's made in "The Dark Side of Camelot" (Little, Brown, $26.95)
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
At 9:15 a.m. Sept. 11, Seymour Hersh got a telephone call from David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker magazine. Along with the rest of America, both were transfixed by the televised horror of the World Trade Center in flames. "The second tower had been hit, but the first tower hadn't fallen yet," Hersh recalls. "He said, `You're not doing anything else for the next year.' I said, `Of course.'" Thus was the indefatigable Sy Hersh launched on the biggest story of our time. Because Hersh has been astonishing people with his stories since he broke the news of the massacre by U.S. troops at My Lai during the Vietnam War, there was reason to believe he would unearth something interesting.
NEWS
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1997
Despite a small number of books criticizing President John F. Kennedy since his assassination, many continue to think of him as an unblemished paragon - a glamorous, intelligent, hard-working chief executive. They like the image of Camelot perpetuated by Kennedy partisans.At least some Americans want the truth about their presidents, though, even when comfortable myths are shattered. That is where Seymour Hersh comes in. His book, "The Dark Side of Camelot" (Little, Brown, 498 pages, $26.95)
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | November 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary puts us in our place. The definition of ''journalism'' begins: ''The occupation of reporting, writing, editing . . . '' The sample sentence there reads: ''He calls himself a historian, but his books are mere journalism.''If they had asked me, I would have said that journalism is a self-created tribe. The best thing about my business is that you become a reporter by saying you are one. This is no profession; there are no licenses, no entrance examination, no written standards, no review boards, no required education.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BAER and SUSAN BAER,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- This is no book tour.Seymour M. Hersh blows into the hotel lobby like a cyclone in a suit and declares: "I'm in a war."At the end of week one of what he calls "pimping away" -- traveling around the country to promote his controversial and much-maligned new book on John F. Kennedy -- the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist has arrived for an interview armed and combat-ready.His briefcase is stuffed with documents to back up the many sensational and devastating charges he's made in "The Dark Side of Camelot" (Little, Brown, $26.95)
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 14, 1997
The price of a dime phone call will go from 25 to 35 cents.U.N. members are showing the same unanimous resolve toward Iraq displayed previously with respect to Bosnia.Don't look now, but the U.S. is in a blood feud with a murderous little band in Pakistan -- an awkward position for a great power to find itself in.Seymour Hersh could be the Kitty Kelley of the American monarchy.Pub Date: 11/14/97
FEATURES
By Michael Prager and Michael Prager,BOSTON GLOBE | October 19, 1997
It is grand to have illusions, until you find out they're illusions. That disheartening lesson comes in the November Vanity Fair, in Robert Sam Anson's report on Seymour Hersh's coming book on the Kennedys.Hersh burst into prominence in the late '60s when he revealed the massacre at My Lai, and it was only the first in an explosion of exposes: the secret bombing of North Vietnam, then of Cambodia; domestic spying by the CIA; the wiretapping of Kissinger's aides.Sy Hersh seemed to be someone to emulate.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
NSA's monthly news-letters - which still contain a warning that copies "should be destroyed as soon as they are read" - give a glimpse of the agency's unique culture. Some excerpts:October 1960:Learn more about the communist conspiracyThe following books are among the thirty-five recently placed on the Security Bookshelf: Pattern for World Revolution, Ypsilon; My Retreat from Russia, Petrov; I Chose Freedom, Kravchenko. ... One hundred volumes covering the Communist plan and its operation throughout the world now are available.
NEWS
By Paul Duke and Paul Duke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 1997
"The Dark Side of Camelot," by Seymour Hersh. Little Brown. 498 pages. $26.95.Hardly anybody has had a kind word to say about this book. No sooner had it rolled off the presses than the critics began gunning it down in a fusillade of angry denunciations.Seymour Hersh may be a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, but the howlers claim he has recklessly gone off the deep end with his harsh portrait of John Kennedy and his licentious lifestyle: that the latest revelations are more fiction than fact, that the episodes of misconduct are no more than warmed-over mud, that this tell-all tale is mostly a collection of tasteless trash that exposes the dark and irresponsible side of Hersh more than the darker side of Camelot.
NEWS
October 23, 1991
The most chilling discovery of the United Nations inspection team charged with dismantling Iraq's nuclear weapons has been evidence that Iraq not only was on the verge of producing an atomic bomb but that it also had plans for developing hydrogen bombs hundreds of times more destructive than the weapons dropped on Japan in World War II.Iraq was so close, in fact, to building a primitive atomic weapon that if Saddam had waited only a few months before invading...
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