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By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 5, 1991
Q: Is tuberculosis a contagious, or "catchy" thing? Can you get it if you have sexual relations with a person who has tuberculosis? If someone does this, should he or she see a doctor for a TB test?A: Tuberculosis is contagious but it is not one of the diseases transmitted through sexual relations. The explosive problem of sexually transmitted diseases includes AIDS, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes simplex, chlamydia, lymphogranuloma venereum, chancroid, granuloma inguinale, condyloma acuminata (genital warts)
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HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
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FEATURES
By New York Times Syndication | April 20, 1993
Birth control is an important issue that affects a woman's overall health, says Dr. Ronald Chez, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of South Florida in Tampa.When a woman is weighing contraceptive options, she needs to consider any health conditions she has had in the past, such as overweight, high cholesterol, anemia or an abnormal Pap-smearresult.Dr. Chez also believes the following issues should be part of any doctor/patient discussion about birth control: frequency of intercourse, number of sexual partners, risk of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, degree of reliability a woman demands from a contraceptive and interest in future pregnancies.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Doctors and patients alike are often uncomfortable talking about sexual health and sexually transmitted disease. But a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that this squeamishness costs society millions of dollars spent trying to treat or cure diseases that could have been prevented, vaccinated against, screened for or detected at an earlier stage of development. According to the CDC, about 19 million Americans each year are affected by sexually transmitted diseases and infections.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | September 18, 1993
Dr. Neil Solomon, battered by allegations he engaged in sexual impropriety with former patients, yesterday issued a sharply worded statement charging his "phantom accusers" are out to ruin his bid for governor and collect a multimillion-dollar jackpot in the process."
NEWS
By New York Times | October 22, 1991
MORE THAN a million teen-agers get pregnant every year. Sexually transmitted diseases are commonplace.And the majority of Americans between 20 and 29 who have AIDS now were almost certainly infected in adolescence.Educating children about sexuality and its implications is, quite literally, vital to their future.Most parents support sex education. But the gap between what they want and what schools deliver is wide, mainly because there's no agreement on what the curriculum should contain.The Sex Information and Education Council of the United States has now published guidelines that could lead to a consensus.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | November 3, 1992
Q: Is Norplant safe for teen-agers? How does it work? I have trouble remembering to take my birth control pills.A: Studies of Norplant use by teen-agers are just getting under way, but the information we have available suggests it should be safe for them. Norplant consists of six slender progesterone-containing rods that are inserted under the skin of the upper arm during a minor surgical procedure. The person inserting the rods has only to make a tiny incision in the skin with a small amount of local anesthetic.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 1, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Women who have sexual relationships with men suffering from genital herpes run a high risk of contracting the incurable disease themselves, even if the man has no symptoms, a new study says.The findings, reported today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, based in Philadelphia, provide a chilling warning to both women and men who think they can avoid the disease by having sex only with those who do not have visible herpes sores.And there is little protection in having sex only with men or women who say they do not have herpes because 80 percent of genital herpes carriers do not know they have the disease, said the study's lead author, Gregory Mertz of the University of New Mexico.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
The ubiquitous health commissioner of Baltimore, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, called a news conference yesterday afternoon to deliver an urgent message to a panicked citizenry: Chill out. "It is not," Beilenson said of the cicada invasion that should begin in just a few days, "the end of civilization as we know it." He then provided a scientific estimate for the number of cicadas that will crawl from the ground in Maryland and attach themselves to trees, screen doors and human hair: "in the billions."
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | October 8, 1991
Q: I think my daughter may be having sex even though she says she's not. If I take her for a gynecological exam, can the doctor tell me if she's still a virgin?A: It would be very difficult for any physician to answer your question based on a physical exam. Presumably, you are wondering whether her hymen is intact as a sign of virginity. However, there is considerable variation in the anatomy of the hymen during adolescence, making it an unreliable indicator of virginity.Your question raises important points about your relationship with your daughter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Eleanor Z. Winkenwerder, a retired social worker who helped research syphilis at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the 1930s and later became an artist, died in her sleep Wednesday at Roland Park Place. She was 99. Eleanor Zouck, the daughter of a Baltimore lumber executive, was born at home on Belmont Avenue in Glyndon. "She would often joke that her one claim to fame was that she was brought into this world by Dr. T. Rowe Price, father of the founder of T. Rowe Price," said her son, Peter Winkenwerder of Glyndon.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
Bill limits legislators' scholarship power Legislators would no longer be able to award scholarships to their relatives or to the families of their colleagues under a bill passed by the state Senate yesterday. Members of the General Assembly get about $11 million a year to distribute in scholarships to college students, a system that has been subject to frequent criticism from government watchdog groups, who accuse lawmakers of using the money to reward friends or buy votes. The bill passed 39-8, with some senators saying the measure was a misguided attempt to legislate common sense.
NEWS
By Bronwyn Mayden | February 9, 2005
THE BUSH administration appears to be throwing good money after bad in funding for abstinence-only programs nationwide. Studies of the effectiveness of abstinence-only education show that the courses do not appear to decrease teen pregnancy or the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. Yet the government has increased funding for these programs by more than 50 percent since 2001, spending about $170 million over that time. Eleven of 13 federally funded abstinence-only programs conducted in communities and schools in 25 states provide adolescents with false and misleading information about reproductive health, a report says.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 3, 2004
JUST WHEN you think the human race has turned sex into some kind of carnal Match Game, with hook-ups, buddy sex and "friends with benefits," there is Dr. Ruth to cheer you up. As tiny as a sparkplug and with just as much energy, the gently aging sex therapist is still talking as if sex is an act of love, humor, patience and communication between two people who are committed to each other. "I am a grandmother, and I am still talking about sex," Westheimer told a packed auditorium of Johns Hopkins University students recently.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
Maryland women who want to be screened for two sexually transmitted diseases can now do it at home instead of traipsing to the doctor's office for an uncomfortable pelvic exam, under a pilot program led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, offers free kits from local pharmacies that allow women to test themselves for chlamydia and gonorrhea, then send a sample back to a Hopkins lab in a postage-paid envelope.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
The ubiquitous health commissioner of Baltimore, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, called a news conference yesterday afternoon to deliver an urgent message to a panicked citizenry: Chill out. "It is not," Beilenson said of the cicada invasion that should begin in just a few days, "the end of civilization as we know it." He then provided a scientific estimate for the number of cicadas that will crawl from the ground in Maryland and attach themselves to trees, screen doors and human hair: "in the billions."
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market a combined test for two common sexually transmitted diseases in women. Digene's test will be the first available in the United States that can screen for gonorrhea and chlamydia in women at the same time. Currently, tests for the diseases must be performed separately. Digene's Hybrid Capture II test is designed to diagnose the two diseases from a single swab sample from a woman's cervix.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday the approval of a condom designed for women -- a device that for the first time will allow women to protect themselves from sexually transmitted diseases in the deadly age of AIDS.If the condom gets final approval by the Food and Drug Administration, a woman will no longer "have to negotiate with a man or be dependent on a man . . . for protecting her," said Dr. Mervyn F. Silverman, president of the American Foundation for AIDS Research, who has served as a consultant to the manufacturer.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 7, 2000
ONE OF MY teen-aged children phoned me at the office and demanded in an accusatory tone to know if I had written about condoms. There was an awkward pause during which I failed to compose myself. Then I said, as defensively as this sounds, "Well. Ummm. I sort of, you know, had this report and it was important, and, um --" "Well, just cut it out, OK?" came the sharp response. That was the end of that phone call. I had written that disturbing new research shows that while more teens are using protection -- usually condoms -- the first time they have sex, fewer report using protection the last time they had sex. I said that parents have to make it clear that we don't think sex is good for teen-agers, for all sorts of medical and emotional reasons, but if they are having sex, they need to use protection every single time.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market a combined test for two common sexually transmitted diseases in women. Digene's test will be the first available in the United States that can screen for gonorrhea and chlamydia in women at the same time. Currently, tests for the diseases must be performed separately. Digene's Hybrid Capture II test is designed to diagnose the two diseases from a single swab sample from a woman's cervix.
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