Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSexual Predators
IN THE NEWS

Sexual Predators

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
ALBANY, N.Y. -- For Vincent Scala, the debate over the civil confinement of sexual predators pits his personal beliefs as "a card-carrying member of the ACLU" against his family ties. In June, Scala's cousin, Concetta Russo-Carriero, was stabbed to death as she walked to her car in the parking garage of a White Plains, N.Y., shopping mall. The homeless man arrested and charged with the crime was released in 2003 after spending nearly 24 years in prison for rape and being repeatedly denied parole.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2014
There's good reason nursery schools don't hire convicted child molesters as teachers and banks won't consider people found guilty of embezzlement for positions as tellers. The explanation is simple: Certain jobs - including nurses, therapists, social workers and so on - can only be safely filled by people of demonstrably good character because society has such a huge stake in ensuring they carry out their duties in a way that protects both their employers and the public they serve. That's why teachers and tellers are routinely required to undergo a criminal background check before they can start work.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 6, 2014
There's good reason nursery schools don't hire convicted child molesters as teachers and banks won't consider people found guilty of embezzlement for positions as tellers. The explanation is simple: Certain jobs - including nurses, therapists, social workers and so on - can only be safely filled by people of demonstrably good character because society has such a huge stake in ensuring they carry out their duties in a way that protects both their employers and the public they serve. That's why teachers and tellers are routinely required to undergo a criminal background check before they can start work.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 27, 2014
Legislation barring discrimination against transgender people passed the General Assembly on Thursday, as the House of Delegates approved the bill after an impassioned debate. The vote sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who said he will sign it. The bill, approved by the House 82-57, prohibits discrimination based on gender identity in housing and employment, in obtaining credit and in access to public accommodations. Five Maryland localities, including Baltimore City and Baltimore and Howard counties, have similar laws.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | March 23, 2006
Horrifying stories about the rapes and murders of children and about judges who go easy on sex offenders who prey on the young have prompted some state legislatures to tighten the laws and restrict the sentencing discretion of judges. Few in the media or among the intelligentsia have been as outraged about these sadistic crimes against children as they have been about whether terrorists' phone calls have been intercepted. Part of this is politics, but part of it is the continuation of a tradition that goes back more than two centuries - de-emphasizing the punishment of criminals.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2001
The killing of a 9-year-old Frederick boy has prompted a renewed push for a state law that would keep sexual predators locked up after they have completed their prison terms. Supporters of the measure, which has failed three times in the Maryland General Assembly, say such a law would have saved the life of Christoper Lee Ausherman, who was sexually assaulted and killed in November. Authorities have charged Elmer Spencer Jr., 46, a man with a history of convictions for sex crimes, in Christopher's death.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2005
MOUNT DORA, Fla. - For now, it's a case in Idaho that has seized the nation's attention, reviving outrage, anger and debate over the treatment of sex offenders. But in Florida, rocked by the lurid kidnap-murders of two young girls, the issue has been on people's minds much of the year. A number of Florida cities and towns have recently been adopting laws requiring people convicted of sex crimes against minors to reside at least 2,500 feet - slightly less than half a mile - from schools, school bus stops, day care centers, parks, playgrounds or other places where youngsters congregate.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2005
In the aftermath of highly publicized cases of child murders by registered sex offenders, Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday that he will push for legislation requiring lifetime supervision of violent sexual predators and a more active approach for notifying communities that an offender is about to be released into their midst. In 2001, Curran urged legislators to pass a law to keep criminals with a history of sex crimes locked up after they complete their prison terms.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
Amid the frenzied effort to approve an electricity rate plan, lawmakers appeared close last night to approving an election-year bill aimed at cracking down on convicted sex offenders. The measure would require strict monitoring of sex offenders once they are released from prison and mandatory prison sentences for the worst sexual predators. The General Assembly failed to pass such legislation during the legislative session that ended in April. But the House Judiciary Committee voted unanimously yesterday for a compromise bill, and its Senate counterpart also approved the measure.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The superintendent of the Naval Academy told a military judge Friday that his decision to prosecute a midshipman in a high-profile sexual assault case was not influenced by politicians, public pressure or his military supervisors. Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller spent more than three hours on the stand in a military court at the Washington Navy Yard defending his decision to pursue charges against Midshipman Joshua Tate. He rebutted the contention that the national spotlight on sexual assault in the military — including a pledge from President Barack Obama to root out sexual predators in the service — affected the way he has handled the case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The superintendent of the Naval Academy told a military judge Friday that his decision to prosecute a midshipman in a high-profile sexual assault case was not influenced by politicians, public pressure or his military supervisors. Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller spent more than three hours on the stand in a military court at the Washington Navy Yard defending his decision to pursue charges against Midshipman Joshua Tate. He rebutted the contention that the national spotlight on sexual assault in the military — including a pledge from President Barack Obama to root out sexual predators in the service — affected the way he has handled the case.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
We praise our military heroes for their courage in battle, as we should. But there are other heroes from the military who deserve our acclaim as well - the sexually abused men and women who have come forward in the public eye ("Military sexual assault victims break the silence," Dec. 15). By showing their faces and giving their names, they demonstrate monumental courage to push past their shame and stand up for a basic human right - to live safely in one's body. They are protesting against a military system that averts its eyes and, by not holding the perpetrators accountable, collaborates with sexual predators.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Police are searching for a man suspected in a string of attempted sexual assaults this summer in Ocean City. Ocean City Police said the suspect is a white male, approximately 5'10", about 170 pounds, and in his mid-20s to early 30s. The alleged assaults have taken place in dimly lit, semi-secluded areas near local bars. In each incident, a woman was under the influence of alcohol and walking home alone when the suspect started up a conversation, police said. Once he begins talking to the victim, the man then forces her to the ground and attempts to sexually assault her. The most recent attempt occurred July 28. Police are warning visitors and residents to avoid excessive alcohol use and to be aware of their surroundings.
NEWS
By Emily Samuelson | November 25, 2011
Child abuse demands that we choose sides. The victim demands that we speak up and take action; the perpetrator demands that we remain silent. Do-nothing bystanders collude with the abuser, enabling him to continue devouring children. That's what is alleged at Penn State. Football trumped the lives of children. Sexual predators will always plague us, out there scanning for prey. The tragedy is that many were victimized as children. They were not protected, no one recognized the traumatic aftereffects, and they had no treatment.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
It sounds like the Sun editorial writers' brains have softened with their article Saturday about Rep. Anthony Weiner ("Why does Anthony Weiner have to resign when other sleazy politicians stay?" June 18). Congressmen Weiner held a position of authority but acted like a sexual predator. He shouldn't have a right to hold office and write laws or introduce legislation that affects normal people. Yet it appears like your editorial writers are defending this type of conduct. The congressman should have been charged with a crime and labeled as a sexual predator just like any other citizen who commits the same violations.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 28, 2010
Since June 2005, I have had some kind of contact -- telephone conversation, face-to-face meeting, e-mail exchange, letter exchange -- with about 5,000 convicted criminals or their relatives, counselors and friends. (The number might be closer to 6,000, but I stopped keeping count a couple of years ago.) Some of the contact has been substantive, providing material for this column on the challenges facing ex-offenders in the transition from prison to free society. A lot of the contact has been perfunctory -- the ex-offenders give me their names and addresses, and I mail them a list of companies that might hire them or agencies that might help them.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 27, 2014
Legislation barring discrimination against transgender people passed the General Assembly on Thursday, as the House of Delegates approved the bill after an impassioned debate. The vote sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who said he will sign it. The bill, approved by the House 82-57, prohibits discrimination based on gender identity in housing and employment, in obtaining credit and in access to public accommodations. Five Maryland localities, including Baltimore City and Baltimore and Howard counties, have similar laws.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
We praise our military heroes for their courage in battle, as we should. But there are other heroes from the military who deserve our acclaim as well - the sexually abused men and women who have come forward in the public eye ("Military sexual assault victims break the silence," Dec. 15). By showing their faces and giving their names, they demonstrate monumental courage to push past their shame and stand up for a basic human right - to live safely in one's body. They are protesting against a military system that averts its eyes and, by not holding the perpetrators accountable, collaborates with sexual predators.
NEWS
September 7, 2009
The allegations still seem incredible: An 11-year-old girl abducted in broad daylight, then raped and held captive for 18 years by a sociopath who fathered two children by his victim. And no one noticed anything amiss until an alert campus police officer, following up on an intuition, sounded the alarm that ultimately led to the arrest of Phillip Garrido, the 51-year-old convicted sex offender now charged in the case. As details of the crime in California came out last week, the nation looked on in horrified fascination.
BUSINESS
By The Record | February 7, 2008
GLEN ROCK, N.J. -- Corporations were the first inspiration for Jerry Salvi's and Michael DenBlaker's online tracking technology. Kids, however, soon became the focus of a broader vision. The brothers-in-law and co-founders of uVee Technologies LLC initially set out to create a product that would allow companies to archive and retrieve employee e-mails, an important technological feature after the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was passed after several corporate accounting scandals.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.