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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
An Army private was sentenced yesterday to three years in a military prison after pleading guilty to aggravated assault and other charges for engaging in unprotected sex despite being ordered by the Army to tell sexual partners that she was HIV positive.Pfc. Gerland Squires, a soldier at Aberdeen Proving Ground, will receive a bad conduct discharge, have her rank reduced from private first class to private and forfeit all pay and benefits."I'm sorry, so sorry," the 21-year-old private said, sobbing, just before a seven-member panel sentenced her on charges of aggravated assault, disobeying a superior and making a false statement to investigators.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014
The photos of the immigrants pouring across the border certainly tug at our heartstrings. We've heard stories of the desire of these immigrants to escape threatening conditions, obtain desperately needed medical attention and seek a better life. The exhausted look of the women and frightened faces of the children speak volumes. Also filling the news lately have been stories about the government's unfairness to women in allowing employers to exempt themselves from paying for certain contraceptives if this runs against their religious beliefs.
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NEWS
By Rowland Nethaway | February 18, 1998
IT'S past time for Americans to start treating the AIDS epidemic more like a deadly disease and less like a political problem.The worldwide AIDS epidemic is outstripping all predictions by health experts at the World Health Organization and the U.N. AIDS program.A costly epidemicEven in the United States, where more than $600 million has been spent on federal prevention programs, the rate of new infections has stayed at 40,000 or so per year. A new, alarming study reports that four of 10 Americans infected with HIV refuse to tell their sexual partners that they are carriers of the deadly human immunodeficiency virus.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Baltimore City health officials say a pilot program that allows people with sexually transmitted diseases to distribute antibiotics to their sexual partners appears to be working. Using three months of data, officials found that among patients with gonorrhea and chlamydia who visited two city health clinics and received extra antibiotics for their partners, the reinfection rate was 2.3 percent. That compares to a historical three-month reinfection rate of 3.9 percent, making the decrease 41 percent.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Baltimore City health officials say a pilot program that allows people with sexually transmitted diseases to distribute antibiotics to their sexual partners appears to be working. Using three months of data, officials found that among patients with gonorrhea and chlamydia who visited two city health clinics and received extra antibiotics for their partners, the reinfection rate was 2.3 percent. That compares to a historical three-month reinfection rate of 3.9 percent, making the decrease 41 percent.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | January 7, 1992
SOMEONE asked me what was the worst of '91. For me it was the live dramas on television that showed us to be ignorant, lustful and morally dysfunctional.The year was a kaleidoscope of rotten mistakes -- those mini events that messed up the lives of real people and that should point the way to immediate reform.From sexual harassment, random recreational sex to allegations of rape, we saw it unfold.First it was the Judiciary Committee hearings of Judge Clarence Thomas and the accusations of Professor Anita Hill that Thomas had sexually harassed her, giving us explicit dirt on television.
NEWS
By Thomas Goldwasser | March 2, 1999
PUBLIC health officials grappling with how to stem the spread of AIDS should adopt a method used to combat syphilis for almost 60 years: contact tracing and partner notification.Even Baltimore, which leads the nation in the number of syphilis cases per capita, has successfully used contact tracing for that disease. Last year, the city recorded 458 syphilis cases, down from 667 in 1997.Contact tracing can work for AIDS, too. During the early years of fighting AIDS, it was understandable not to use such techniques.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | May 9, 2006
If you never have sex, you won't get pregnant. All it takes is once. It is a warning profound in its simplicity, and it is what parents often say to their teenagers. But what if our teenagers do have sex? According to research released last week by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, almost a third of teen girls (ages 15-19) who have had sex at least once have become pregnant. And more than one out of every eight teen boys who have had sex at least once have caused a pregnancy.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
Baltimore's syphilis rate continued to fall last year, bucking a national trend and pushing a city that was once the worst in the nation for new cases to the No. 5 spot. City Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson attributed the improvement to the city's efforts to stem the spread of syphilis among drug users, including people who trade sex for crack cocaine. Among other steps, the city hired more clinicians at its sexually transmitted disease clinics, and it tested and treated people who were arrested and taken to Central Booking and Intake Center.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
The photos of the immigrants pouring across the border certainly tug at our heartstrings. We've heard stories of the desire of these immigrants to escape threatening conditions, obtain desperately needed medical attention and seek a better life. The exhausted look of the women and frightened faces of the children speak volumes. Also filling the news lately have been stories about the government's unfairness to women in allowing employers to exempt themselves from paying for certain contraceptives if this runs against their religious beliefs.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | May 9, 2006
If you never have sex, you won't get pregnant. All it takes is once. It is a warning profound in its simplicity, and it is what parents often say to their teenagers. But what if our teenagers do have sex? According to research released last week by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, almost a third of teen girls (ages 15-19) who have had sex at least once have become pregnant. And more than one out of every eight teen boys who have had sex at least once have caused a pregnancy.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
Baltimore's syphilis rate continued to fall last year, bucking a national trend and pushing a city that was once the worst in the nation for new cases to the No. 5 spot. City Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson attributed the improvement to the city's efforts to stem the spread of syphilis among drug users, including people who trade sex for crack cocaine. Among other steps, the city hired more clinicians at its sexually transmitted disease clinics, and it tested and treated people who were arrested and taken to Central Booking and Intake Center.
NEWS
By Thomas Goldwasser | March 2, 1999
PUBLIC health officials grappling with how to stem the spread of AIDS should adopt a method used to combat syphilis for almost 60 years: contact tracing and partner notification.Even Baltimore, which leads the nation in the number of syphilis cases per capita, has successfully used contact tracing for that disease. Last year, the city recorded 458 syphilis cases, down from 667 in 1997.Contact tracing can work for AIDS, too. During the early years of fighting AIDS, it was understandable not to use such techniques.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
An Army private was sentenced yesterday to three years in a military prison after pleading guilty to aggravated assault and other charges for engaging in unprotected sex despite being ordered by the Army to tell sexual partners that she was HIV positive.Pfc. Gerland Squires, a soldier at Aberdeen Proving Ground, will receive a bad conduct discharge, have her rank reduced from private first class to private and forfeit all pay and benefits."I'm sorry, so sorry," the 21-year-old private said, sobbing, just before a seven-member panel sentenced her on charges of aggravated assault, disobeying a superior and making a false statement to investigators.
NEWS
By Rowland Nethaway | February 18, 1998
IT'S past time for Americans to start treating the AIDS epidemic more like a deadly disease and less like a political problem.The worldwide AIDS epidemic is outstripping all predictions by health experts at the World Health Organization and the U.N. AIDS program.A costly epidemicEven in the United States, where more than $600 million has been spent on federal prevention programs, the rate of new infections has stayed at 40,000 or so per year. A new, alarming study reports that four of 10 Americans infected with HIV refuse to tell their sexual partners that they are carriers of the deadly human immunodeficiency virus.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 6, 1997
MY 11-YEAR-OLD daughter and her friends were chatting about the doctor or lawyer they would marry and how many girl children they would have (they are all man-hating sisters of boys) when I swooped into their fantasy like a CIA plane leafleting a Southeast Asian village.No one senses a propaganda opportunity like a mother."Girls," I said, "let's all describe how we are going to decorate our Capitol Hill apartments after we graduate from law school and are hired by a liberal Democratic senator to write anti-poverty legislation.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 13, 1992
Boston. -- This is how the Magic Johnson story moves from one public place to another. Off the basketball court and into the court of law.One day, the man with the megawatt smile is forced to face his teammates' fears that they could be infected by him. The next day, he's forced to face a woman's claim that she was infected by him.One week his book is published bearing this paragraph about his many sexual partners: ''Of the women I have talked to, nobody...
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 22, 1993
As if you needed more evidence that the typical American male (malus Americanus) is a lying piece of dirt, I offer you the "The Janus Report on Sexual Behavior."The recently released book is a serious study (sorry, no pictures) based on 8,000 interviews conducted over a nine-year period, with respondents ranging from ages 18 to 80.That's a lot of sex talk, and all of it apparently without benefit of a 900 number.The headline from the book is that Americans like sex. They like sex a lot. In fact, according to the Janus report, Americans like sex nearly as much as they like cable TV.This much I might believe.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The sex lives of most Americans are nothing like the sexually charged culture in which we live, according to a new study from university researchers.The 700-page study, "The Social Organization of Sexuality," is believed to be the most authoritative overview ever of sexual practices in the United States.Based on interviews with 3,400 Americans, the study released ++ yesterday concludes that people have fewer sexual encounters, fewer partners and less exotic sex than reported in past surveys and in the mass media.
NEWS
By Eric Fassin | December 28, 1993
A GOOD consensus is hard to find -- especially on sexual politics today in America.But the infamous rules instituted last year by Antioch College, which require students to give explicit verbal consent before so much as a kiss is exchanged, have created just that.They have provoked indignation (this is a serious threat to individual freedom!) as well as ridicule (can this be serious?).Sexual correctness thus proves a worthy successor to political correctness as a target in public debate.Yet this consensus reveals shared assumptions among both liberals and conservatives about the sexual The question is no longer "Did she say no?"
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