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Sexual Orientation

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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | June 13, 1995
Q: At what age do teens decide their sexuality?A: What we think you are asking is at what age do teens decide their sexual orientation. The term sexual orientation refers to an individual finding himself or herself sexually attracted to people of the same sex, opposite sex or both. Sexuality is a broader term and reflects the fact that all human beings have sexual feelings and desires.Not a lot of up-to-date research is available to answer your question. What we do know suggests that most people become aware of their sexual orientation before adolescence, even though they may try to deny these feelings.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Christopher Doyle says he doesn't think there is anything wrong with being gay, but he also believes he can help children and others rid themselves of "unwanted same-sex attractions" through therapy sessions in a tidy suburban home in Bowie. That has made the licensed psychotherapist the target of intense criticism over the years - so much so, he says, that he closely protects the address of the International Healing Foundation, the nearly 25-year-old nonprofit he runs. "Unfortunately, we get targeted by activists," Doyle said in the home on a recent morning.
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NEWS
March 4, 2011
As a recent college graduate and proud Morgan State alumna who served as president of our campus' Gay-Straight Alliance, I have found that many people in Baltimore are supportive of others, no matter what their sexual orientation. I hope that the state legislature does the right thing and votes for House Bill 175, the Religious Freedom and Civil Marriage Protection Act. It's the job of our elected officials to vote for their constituents and not for their disapproval of people's differences.
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Thomas F. Schaller | March 4, 2014
Beyond the characters, writing and wardrobes, the reason I most enjoy AMC's superb television series "Mad Men" is that it disabuses Americans - whether or not they old enough to remember the nation as it really was 50 years ago - of the false conceit that the United States was pure and idyllic prior to the civil rights, feminist and environmental revolutions. In the show, men routinely grope women at the office; black bellhops and elevator operators are treated like curios, or worse; Don and Betty Draper finish a picnic by lifting their blanket and strewing trash across a public park.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Christopher Doyle says he doesn't think there is anything wrong with being gay, but he also believes he can help children and others rid themselves of "unwanted same-sex attractions" through therapy sessions in a tidy suburban home in Bowie. That has made the licensed psychotherapist the target of intense criticism over the years - so much so, he says, that he closely protects the address of the International Healing Foundation, the nearly 25-year-old nonprofit he runs. "Unfortunately, we get targeted by activists," Doyle said in the home on a recent morning.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
In a decision with wide-reaching implications, a federal appeals court ruled this week that potential jurors cannot be left off of juries based on their sexual orientations . Remember the antitrust case involving two purveyors of HIV/AIDS drugs that was moving through appeals courts this September? (I know the answer's no - hence the link.) The short version: GlaxoSmithKline appealed a jury's verdict because lawyers for its opponent in the case, Abbott Laboratories, removed a gay man from the jury using a no-questions-asked peremptory strike.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Despite numerous marriage equality-related cases currently making their way through the judicial system, it's somehow the hot-button area of antitrust law where an important LGBT rights issue is taking place. The Associated Press reported Wednesday that the battle between two dueling pharmaceutical companies over an AIDS drug has sparked a debate over whether gay men and lesbians can be removed from juries due to their sexual orientations. The case (SmithKline Beecham Corp.
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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
The broad statement against discrimination passed by Carroll Community College trustees last night stops short of naming sexual orientation, although it names other categories such as race and gender."
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By Jean Latz Griffin and Jean Latz Griffin,Chicago Tribune | December 16, 1991
A NEW Northwestern University study of twins and adoptive brothers provides some of the strongest suggestions to date that sexual orientation is determined in large part by genetic factors.Interviewing 56 identical male twins in which at least one twin was a homosexual, researchers found that in 52 percent of the cases, the other twin also was gay.By contrast, such pairings were seen in 22 percent of 54 fraternal twins and 11 percent of 57 adoptive brothers.Co-author J. Michael Bailey said the study, released yesterday, "suggests a genetic contribution to sexual orientation," since brothers with the most identical genetic material were most likely to be gay."
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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2003
IS THERE A biological basis for homosexuality? With gay marriage now supported by Massachusetts' highest court and homosexuality likely to be a hot issue in the presidential campaign, the question of whether sexual orientation is an innate or acquired trait is increasingly urgent. Since at least 1991, some scientific research has suggested that there is a biological basis to homosexuality - meaning sexual orientation is at least partly natural destiny, not a choice. But that point is open to debate, and our understanding is still fuzzy.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
In a decision with wide-reaching implications, a federal appeals court ruled this week that potential jurors cannot be left off of juries based on their sexual orientations . Remember the antitrust case involving two purveyors of HIV/AIDS drugs that was moving through appeals courts this September? (I know the answer's no - hence the link.) The short version: GlaxoSmithKline appealed a jury's verdict because lawyers for its opponent in the case, Abbott Laboratories, removed a gay man from the jury using a no-questions-asked peremptory strike.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
A total of 7,164 people were the victim of a reported hate crime across the country in 2012, with 19.2 percent of them targeted because of their sexual orientation, according to new data released by the FBI on Monday . The numbers show a decline compared to 2011, when 7,713 victims were reported targeted, 20.4 percent because of their sexual orientation. In 2012, 1,376 victims were targeted for their sexual orientation. Of the offenses, 53.9 percent were based on "anti-male homosexual" bias, 28.6 percent on a general "anti-homosexual" bias, 12.7 percent on an "anti-female homosexual" bias, 3 percent on an "anti-bisexual" bias, and 1.9 percent on an "anti-heterosexual" bias.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Most Americans believe that a person should not be discriminated against in the workplace because of sexual orientation. Polls have shown this consistently and strongly for years. So it shouldn't be too much of a shock if the U.S. Senate this week approves legislation to ban on-the-job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Yet it is a bit of an eye-opener. Not because it's not the right thing to do but because there are still so many lawmakers in Washington and around the country who favor discrimination.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Despite numerous marriage equality-related cases currently making their way through the judicial system, it's somehow the hot-button area of antitrust law where an important LGBT rights issue is taking place. The Associated Press reported Wednesday that the battle between two dueling pharmaceutical companies over an AIDS drug has sparked a debate over whether gay men and lesbians can be removed from juries due to their sexual orientations. The case (SmithKline Beecham Corp.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Major League Baseball will announce Tuesday a new policy to protect players from discrimination and harassment based on sexual-orientation, according to a report from The Associated Press . Per MLB's new guidelines, which strengthen existing policies, the league will develop a workplace code of conduct, create a centralized system for reports of harassment and offer new training sessions to major league and minor league athletes. The league plans to announce its policy during Tuesday's All-Star Game festivities in New York.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
A new poll released today shows the largest measured gap between Americans who believe individuals are born gay and those who believe sexual orientation is caused by external factors. According to Gallup , 47 percent of Americans chose "nature" over "nurture" when asked about same-sex orientation, while 33 percent say they believe being gay is a product of an individual's upbringing and environment. As recently as 2011, public opinion on the causes of sexual orientation were about equally split.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
A total of 7,164 people were the victim of a reported hate crime across the country in 2012, with 19.2 percent of them targeted because of their sexual orientation, according to new data released by the FBI on Monday . The numbers show a decline compared to 2011, when 7,713 victims were reported targeted, 20.4 percent because of their sexual orientation. In 2012, 1,376 victims were targeted for their sexual orientation. Of the offenses, 53.9 percent were based on "anti-male homosexual" bias, 28.6 percent on a general "anti-homosexual" bias, 12.7 percent on an "anti-female homosexual" bias, 3 percent on an "anti-bisexual" bias, and 1.9 percent on an "anti-heterosexual" bias.
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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
As the Baltimore City Council moves to deter attacks on gays and lesbians through a local hate-crimes law, a state delegate who sponsored Maryland's hate-crimes statute wants to expand the law to include sexual orientation.State law covers racial and ethnically based hate crimes.Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat, said he is drafting a bill to be introduced in the General Assembly in January to amend the state law in the wake of Matthew Shepard's killing Oct. 12 in Laramie, Wyo. The university student, 21, was killed in part because he was gay.Since last week's incident, gays and lesbians across the country have been calling on local, state and federal lawmakers to draft measures to help deter attacks on people because of their sexual orientation.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
What does it say about our society when the sports and national news headlines as well as social media are all saturated with reports of a professional athlete's sexual orientation ("NBA player Jason Collins coming out is a defining moment in sports," April 29)? Who really cares? What kind of people care about someone's choice of partners? I don't understand why anyone chooses to tell the world that they prefer one sex over the other. That is a personal choice and only people with too much time on their hands or an unnatural desire to know about everyone else's private business will feel the need to know this information.
NEWS
February 9, 2013
For 102 years, people have been treated unequally by the Boy Scouts, and on Jan. 28, the organization's board delayed a vote on whether to allow local chapters to decide whether to admit gay members and leaders. In Maryland where gay couples are now legally allowed to get married, they still may not be allowed to join Scouting. This ultimately provides an adverse consequence to a newly-earned freedom. No one should not be declined from the Boy Scouts because of sexual orientation.
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