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Sexual Dysfunction

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HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
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HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Doctors who hailed the drug Viagra as a breakthrough for impotent men are predicting that it could have unexpected benefits for women suffering sexual difficulties.Physicians are basing their hopes on evidence that the drug works upon chemical pathways and tissues that are remarkably similar in men and women. That doesn't mean the drug will have the same dramatic benefits in women, but researchers are eager to find out.Pfizer Inc., a pharmaceutical giant that is expected to reap huge profits from sales to men, has been testing the drug for twoyears among European women who have sexual dysfunction.
NEWS
September 19, 2008
MARILYN FITHIAN, 87 Sex therapist Marilyn Fithian, an influential sex therapist and researcher known for her studies on nudity and sexual dysfunction, died Sept. 11 at Long Beach Community Hospital in California. The cause was complications of pneumonia, according to her granddaughter, Michelle Todd. With colleague and longtime companion William E. Hartman, who died in 1997, Miss Fithian founded the Center for Marital and Sexual Studies in Long Beach, where they conducted research and treated people with sexual problems.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It's a common side effect of many antidepressants: decreased sexual function. For years, doctors have known that men with the problem can get help from Viagra. Now a study confirms that the little blue pill may also help women. The research, which appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, found that women who took Viagra reported increased levels of sexual functioning, compared with those who took a placebo. "It worked well for this group, not quite as strong as the men, but better than any other medicine [for sexual dysfunction]
NEWS
September 19, 2008
MARILYN FITHIAN, 87 Sex therapist Marilyn Fithian, an influential sex therapist and researcher known for her studies on nudity and sexual dysfunction, died Sept. 11 at Long Beach Community Hospital in California. The cause was complications of pneumonia, according to her granddaughter, Michelle Todd. With colleague and longtime companion William E. Hartman, who died in 1997, Miss Fithian founded the Center for Marital and Sexual Studies in Long Beach, where they conducted research and treated people with sexual problems.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1993
At least 10 million American men have problems with sexual function. And those are just the ones who have sought help. Whether the cause is the aging process, an injury, side effects of medication or a disease such as diabetes, interruption of normal sexual relations is a complicated and intensely personal issue.Women who are partners of men with sexual dysfunction often don't know what their role should be. Peter Fagan, director of the Sexual Behaviors Consultation Unit at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, advises couples that coping with this change in their lives involves honest conversation and an understanding of the physical and emotional factors that may cause the dysfunction.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
A class of highly effective heart drugs called beta-blockers have developed a reputation for causing depression, impotence and fatigue. But a new study has found that the drugs' reputed side effects have been overblown. The study of 15 trials involving 35,000 patients was conducted by researchers trying to understand why so many physicians are reluctant to prescribe beta-blockers, even though they lower blood pressure, improve heart function and survival in patients with heart failure, and reduce deaths after heart attacks by 20 percent.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 1999
PEOPLE concerned about whether their government can do the equivalent of bombing and chewing gum at the same time ought to be reassured by a couple of government memos that have recently come to my attention.The Training and Career Development Division of the National Institutes of Health's Program Support Center is inviting employees to a May 4 "intensive three-hour workshop on a process proven to create documents that drive action and support strategic decision."The purpose of the workshop is "to learn the six steps for meeting the president's plain language requirements."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 1997
A new study has added to the criticism of routine circumcision, finding that circumcision does not lead to lower rates of sexually transmitted diseases as had been thought.The incidence of two of those diseases was even higher among circumcised men.However, sexual dysfunction was found to be slightly more common among uncircumcised men.The study also found that circumcised men were significantly more likely to engage in a varied repertoire of sexual practices.The study was the first systematic look at the effects of circumcision on disease and sexual behavior, according to a report in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It's a common side effect of many antidepressants: decreased sexual function. For years, doctors have known that men with the problem can get help from Viagra. Now a study confirms that the little blue pill may also help women. The research, which appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, found that women who took Viagra reported increased levels of sexual functioning, compared with those who took a placebo. "It worked well for this group, not quite as strong as the men, but better than any other medicine [for sexual dysfunction]
NEWS
By Regina Nuzzo and Regina Nuzzo,Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2007
Remember fitness in the 1970s? All those aerobics classes, leotards and sweatbands, the endless jogging and velour track suits? Got to crank up that heart rate to 90 percent of maximum, experts told us. No pain, no gain. But today a new, easygoing message reigns: Leave the spandex at home - you don't have to sweat or even change your clothes. Simply take a walk. Aim for least 30 minutes of activity on most days of the week, experts advise. Break it up into a few brisk-walking "snacks," if you prefer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 28, 2005
The network's prime-time schedule is in free fall. The producer has created more flops than hits in recent years. And the genre appears to be on the verge of exhaustion. That is the recipe for failure out of which NBC's new reality-legal series The Law Firm was created by David E. Kelley. While he has written such innovative prime-time series as Ally McBeal and Picket Fences, when Kelley is bad, he is truly awful. His first foray into reality programming, which premieres at 9 tonight on the reeling NBC, promises to rank with such Kelley bombs as Snoops (female private eyes using "nipple cams" - canceled by CBS after 10 episodes in 1999)
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
A class of highly effective heart drugs called beta-blockers have developed a reputation for causing depression, impotence and fatigue. But a new study has found that the drugs' reputed side effects have been overblown. The study of 15 trials involving 35,000 patients was conducted by researchers trying to understand why so many physicians are reluctant to prescribe beta-blockers, even though they lower blood pressure, improve heart function and survival in patients with heart failure, and reduce deaths after heart attacks by 20 percent.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 1999
PEOPLE concerned about whether their government can do the equivalent of bombing and chewing gum at the same time ought to be reassured by a couple of government memos that have recently come to my attention.The Training and Career Development Division of the National Institutes of Health's Program Support Center is inviting employees to a May 4 "intensive three-hour workshop on a process proven to create documents that drive action and support strategic decision."The purpose of the workshop is "to learn the six steps for meeting the president's plain language requirements."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Maryland insurers in general are paying for prescriptions for Viagra, the hot new $10-a-pill treatment for male impotence.And the demand has been high. "It's like when we invented vasectomies," said Dr. Stephen Cohen, chief of urology at Sinai Hospital. He said his office is getting 30 phone calls a day inquiring about Viagra.Michael Podburkski, director of pharmacy for Rite Aid Corp., said he started getting questions about the availability of the drug even before it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Maryland insurers in general are paying for prescriptions for Viagra, the hot new $10-a-pill treatment for male impotence.And the demand has been high. "It's like when we invented vasectomies," said Dr. Stephen Cohen, chief of urology at Sinai Hospital. He said his office is getting 30 phone calls a day inquiring about Viagra.Michael Podburkski, director of pharmacy for Rite Aid Corp., said he started getting questions about the availability of the drug even before it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 28, 2005
The network's prime-time schedule is in free fall. The producer has created more flops than hits in recent years. And the genre appears to be on the verge of exhaustion. That is the recipe for failure out of which NBC's new reality-legal series The Law Firm was created by David E. Kelley. While he has written such innovative prime-time series as Ally McBeal and Picket Fences, when Kelley is bad, he is truly awful. His first foray into reality programming, which premieres at 9 tonight on the reeling NBC, promises to rank with such Kelley bombs as Snoops (female private eyes using "nipple cams" - canceled by CBS after 10 episodes in 1999)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
Doctors who hailed the drug Viagra as a breakthrough for impotent men are predicting that it could have unexpected benefits for women suffering sexual difficulties.Physicians are basing their hopes on evidence that the drug works upon chemical pathways and tissues that are remarkably similar in men and women. That doesn't mean the drug will have the same dramatic benefits in women, but researchers are eager to find out.Pfizer Inc., a pharmaceutical giant that is expected to reap huge profits from sales to men, has been testing the drug for twoyears among European women who have sexual dysfunction.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 31, 1997
"The Ice Storm" stands in perfect contemplative counterpoint to the fervid energy of "Boogie Nights," but just because it's the quieter cousin by no means lessens its wallop. Rather than surface brilliance and raw energy, its power lies in the precise calibration of its emotional elements, which accumulate almost imperceptibly into a shattering and unforgettable whole."The Ice Storm," which director Ang Lee adapted from the Rick Moody novel, transpires over Thanksgiving weekend in 1973, when Nixon's betrayal of the country is being re-enacted in miniature in at least two houses in New Canaan, Conn.
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