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By Tyche Hendricks and Tyche Hendricks,SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | June 22, 1998
Sex is definitely a hot topic on the Internet, but the Web is not breeding a generation of sex addicts, according to a new study by Stanford researcher Alvin Cooper.Instead, Cooper found, Web surfers are looking for a little cybersex entertainment, and the anonymity of the Internet lets them feel more comfortable exploring sexual topics."It's not like the Web is this irresistible sexual magnet, where people who venture in are going to get trapped," he said. "Most people use it for sexual purposes in a recreational way," much as they might watch "Baywatch" or flip through a Playboy magazine.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 28, 2014
Youth who gamble are more at risk for gambling problems and early sexual activity, according to new research involving African American youth in Baltimore. As the city is poised to open its first major casino, researchers from Columbia University joined those from Johns Hopkins in questioning kids in late adolescence about their behavior. The study of 427 youths is online in Addictive Behaviors . The researchers found that almost half had gambled before age 18 and more of the gamblers had initiated sex in that time.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | June 14, 1991
The world-wide AIDS epidemic has taught us many things -- the importance of being ever alert to new viruses, the need for intense international cooperation in fighting diseases that respect no political boundaries -- and how little we know about the sexual and drug proclivities of both men and women.Despite several years of explicit advertising to educate people about unprotected sex, there is still a marked reticence among political and civic leaders to probe too deeply into what really goes on in the bedroom.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 21, 1995
Boston. -- Do you ever get the feeling that someone is missing from the debate about welfare reform? The other parent? The father? The sperm donor? Men?As the Congress writes ever more punitive scenarios for mothers and children, the male of the species barely gets a cameo role. tTC The only part he plays is as deadbeat dad. The only interest the lawmakers have shown is in establishing his DNA. The only policy they are talking about is getting a better grip on his wallet.I have no problem with these proposals.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Nearly one-third of all sexually experienced single women in the United States have changed their sexual behavior because they are worried about AIDS, federal health officials report."
NEWS
By Felicity Barringer and Felicity Barringer,New York Times News Service | April 15, 1993
A new national study on male sexual behavior, the most thorough examination of American men's sexual practices published since the Kinsey report more than four decades ago, shows that about 2 percent of the men surveyed had engaged in homosexual sex and 1 percent considered themselves exclusively homosexual.The figures on homosexuality in the study released yesterday by the Alan Guttmacher Institute are significantly lower than the 10 percent figure that has been part of the country's conventional ,, wisdom since it was published in the Kinsey report.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | November 21, 2004
DR. ALFRED KINSEY was a zoologist studying gall wasps at Indiana University in the 1940s when some of his married students, finding him accessible, approached him with questions about sexual problems they were having. His amazement at their ignorance -- one couple believed that oral sex caused infertility -- caused him to start a "marriage" class at the university, which was soon filled to overflowing with students who pretended to be married or engaged so they could enroll. Finding that he still could not answer their questions about what was "normal," he took a survey of sexual practices among his students.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
Allan W. McMillan, 91, a longtime columnist for the Amsterdam News and the first black syndicated columnist, died Sept. 7 of prostate cancer in New York City. A native of Valdosta, Ga., he played two seasons as a shortstop with the Nashville Elite Giants of the Negro National League before taking a bellhop job in Chicago in 1927. In 1933, he became a reporter for the Chicago Defender, beginning his career with an interview with Al Capone. He also appeared in the Baltimore Afro-American with a column called "Chicago By Day And Night."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 24, 2012
Strides made in the 90s to reduce risky sexual behavior among teens has largely plateaued, federal health data released today has found. The data from the Centers for Disease Control National Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that many teenagers are using condoms and practicing other safe sex practices, but that more needs to be done to increase those numbers, health officials said. The findings were released at the International AIDS conference. People under the age of 30 represent  four of every 10 new HIV infections.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
One has to wonder why the media are making such a big deal of the sexual harassment charges against Republican presidential contender Herman Cain ("Allegations rock GOP's Cain," Nov. 1). Didn't the two-term presidency of Bill Clinton eliminate sexual impropriety as an issue in politics? And how about the John Edwards cover-up? Mr. Cain admits he was accused of sexual harassment when he was president of the National Restaurant Association in the 1990s, but says the charges were "totally baseless" and that "nothing happened" that was improper.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
A Baltimore medical researcher has earned the dubious distinction of landing on a national hit list of questionable stimulus projects. But criticism of her work by a pair of Republican senators might have missed the mark. "Stimulus Checkup," a watchdog report prepared by Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and released in conjunction with Sen. John McCain of Arizona, gives a misleading explanation of a research project involving the highly addictive drug methamphetamine. Coburn and McCain, the Senate's leading critics of wasteful pork-barrel spending, accuse the federal government of awarding University of Maryland researchers "nearly $30,000 to determine whether methamphetamine gives female rats an overpowering desire to have sex."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West , Paul.west@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
Washington - -A Baltimore medical researcher has earned the dubious distinction of landing on a national hit list of questionable stimulus projects. But criticism of her work by a pair of Republican senators might have missed the mark. "Stimulus Checkup," a watchdog report prepared by Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and released in conjunction with Sen. John McCain of Arizona, gives a misleading explanation of a research project involving the highly addictive drug methamphetamine. Coburn and McCain, the Senate's leading critics of wasteful pork-barrel spending, accuse the federal government of awarding University of Maryland researchers "nearly $30,000 to determine whether methamphetamine gives female rats an overpowering desire to have sex."
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2007
If you think people have sex for pleasure and for procreation, you're right. They also have sex to get rid of a headache, to celebrate a special occasion, to get a promotion and to feel closer to God. New research published in the August issue of Archives of Sexual Behavior has come up with a list of 237 reasons that motivate people to have sex. Cindy Meston, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and the lead author of the...
NEWS
By PETER GORNER and PETER GORNER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 21, 2006
Mature adults in countries where men and women hold equal status had more satisfying sex lives than those in male-dominated societies, according to a study billed as the first of its kind to document and compare sexual behavior and satisfaction among middle-aged and older people worldwide. Surveying 27,500 men and women between the ages of 40 and 80 who live in 29 countries, researchers at the University of Chicago found that people reported the greatest sexual satisfaction in Western countries including Austria, Canada and the United States.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2002
Over the past decade, the percentage of high school students who say they are virgins has risen significantly, according to a report published Friday by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Last year, the report found, high school virgins outnumbered those who had engaged in sexual intercourse, 54 percent to 46 percent. A decade earlier, the percentages were the opposite. The study, based on self-reported data from more than 10,000 high school students, also found other evidence of more conservative sexual behavior.
NEWS
By Deborah Roffman | October 21, 1993
ONE preaches abstinence, the other safe sex and the use of condoms. Each professes to have the right solution; each accuses the other of being the real enemy -- indeed, the cause of all the problems that ail us in the first place. Their battle cries were heard most recently in the confirmation process of Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders.But what nonsense to pose this as an either-or question! The right solution is, of course, abstinence. And condoms. And education. And clear messages about sexual values.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A quarter of college students have been touched or grabbed against their will, or someone has intentionally brushed up against them in a sexual way on campus, according to a national survey released here yesterday. The survey by the American Association of University Women, "Drawing the Line: Sexual Harassment on Campus," found that: One in six students had received suggestive pictures, Web pages or messages. 7 percent had had their clothes pulled down. 5 percent were asked for sexual favors in exchange for a better grade, class notes, a recommendation or other perks.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
When author Sabrina Weill was going over a national survey on teens and sex for her new book, one figure in particular jumped out at her. When asked whether sex should be romantic, nearly one-fifth of 1,059 12- to 17-year-olds answered: "Don't know." Coupled with the recent news from a large government study that teenagers who have not yet had intercourse are having oral sex, the information tells Weill that today's young people have no idea what intimacy is. And that it's up to their often-squeamish parents to tell them.
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