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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- John A. Miller IV, described by prosecutors as a "highly motivated predator" who lured a Carroll County girl to her death, was convicted yesterday of murder and sexual assault, setting the stage for a death penalty hearing next week. Miller, 27, was found guilty of first-degree murder, a first-degree sexual offense, robbery and false imprisonment in the strangling of 17-year-old Shen D. Poehlman in Reisterstown in July 1998. The defense had conceded that Miller killed the girl but had fought the sexual-assault and robbery allegations, knowing that prosecutors needed those convictions to pursue the death penalty.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
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NEWS
May 4, 2014
I appreciate the Sun's recent coverage of the issue of sexual assault on college campuses ( "New guidelines to battle sexual assault at colleges," April 29). Towson University is committed to preventing sexual assault and promoting the safest possible environment for our students. In addition to our strong commitment to address sexual assault, Towson University is one of the 10 institutions that formed The Maryland Collaborative. The Maryland Collaborative was established to reduce college drinking and related problems through the application of a range of evidence-based strategies.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
I would like to take this moment to applaud Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley for sticking their necks out to correct the numbers on sexual assault ( "Do the math: rape stats don't add up," Sept. 26). Being rather savvy with numbers myself, I searched for and failed to find a certain number amid the perpetrator apologies and victim blaming in their op-ed: zero. We as a society should never be happy with ourselves until not a single woman is a victim of sexual assault. Maybe the numbers are not one in four, although you would need better evidence to convince me than the authors were able to provide (Women didn't know whether it was rape!
NEWS
October 2, 2014
I would like to take this moment to applaud Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley for sticking their necks out to correct the numbers on sexual assault ( "Do the math: rape stats don't add up," Sept. 26). Being rather savvy with numbers myself, I searched for and failed to find a certain number amid the perpetrator apologies and victim blaming in their op-ed: zero. We as a society should never be happy with ourselves until not a single woman is a victim of sexual assault. Maybe the numbers are not one in four, although you would need better evidence to convince me than the authors were able to provide (Women didn't know whether it was rape!
NEWS
By Carrie Wells | May 30, 2014
Amid a series of changes to federal laws regarding how universities handle sexual assaults and sexual misconduct, the University System of Maryland is in the process of updating its two-decade-old policies on the matter. The Board of Regents of the university system, which includes 11 of the state's public four-year universities, is set to discuss the proposed revisions at a committee meeting Tuesday. The proposal is still under discussion with various stakeholders, including college presidents and their legal counsel, and a final draft will be presented to the full board in late June.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
A well-regarded Howard County nonprofit that is helping 88 clients deal with sexual assault and abuse has announced it will close Dec. 31 because of financial problems made worse by the recession. Lisa Bailey, board chairwoman of the Sexual Trauma Treatment, Advocacy and Recovery Center (or STTAR) for the past two years, said the 32-year-old organization's attempts to expand just as the recession was reaching its peak stretched finances too far. An office in Anne Arundel County closed this fall, she said, and offices in Montgomery County and Columbia will close by year's end. All the patients are being referred to private practitioners, including to some of the group's 15 employees who operate private practices.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
Anne Arundel County police are investigating a reported sexual assault of a girl at Annapolis High School by a fellow student Friday. Officers were called to the school on Riva Road at about 12:30 p.m. for a report of a sexual assault where the female juvenile student said she was sexually assaulted by a male juvenile student. Police said the students knew each other. Detectives from the Criminal Investigation Division's Sex Offense Unit are investigating. Anyone with additional information is asked to contact Detective Justin Widup at 410-222-3468.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Naval Academy midshipmen will get sexual assault prevention lessons as part of classroom education beginning this fall, the academy's new commandant said Wednesday. Previously, efforts to educate midshipmen about sexual assault and sexual harassment have come in seminars and activities with their companies - overall, about 30 hours of instruction over four years. But Navy Capt. Bill Byrne, the academy's new commandant - roughly equivalent to the dean of students at a civilian college - said the academy wants to start hitting the anti-assault messages from "Day One" when midshipmen arrive in Annapolis.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
We praise our military heroes for their courage in battle, as we should. But there are other heroes from the military who deserve our acclaim as well - the sexually abused men and women who have come forward in the public eye ("Military sexual assault victims break the silence," Dec. 15). By showing their faces and giving their names, they demonstrate monumental courage to push past their shame and stand up for a basic human right - to live safely in one's body. They are protesting against a military system that averts its eyes and, by not holding the perpetrators accountable, collaborates with sexual predators.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
An internal investigation found that the Johns Hopkins University failed to alert students, faculty and staff to what it called "a sexual assault" at a fraternity house in March 2013, the school's president said Wednesday in a letter to campus. In the letter, which accompanied the release of the university's 2013 annual security report, President Ronald J. Daniels called the failure to report the incident at Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity's house "unacceptable. " "I want to take this opportunity to reaffirm the University's commitment to the safety and well-being of all members of the Johns Hopkins community - a commitment that includes preventing sexual violence, offering support to victims, dealing firmly and fairly with alleged offenders, and keeping students, faculty and staff informed of crimes that represent a threat to our community," he said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Midshipmen at the Naval Academy have filmed a video pledging to fight sexual assault at the academy and in the Navy and Marine Corps. "It's on us — USNA," a 90-second video, was posted Monday on YouTube. It features a succession of midshipmen, male and female, in uniform and Navy athletic gear, standing before different landmarks on the Annapolis campus, looking into the camera and reading lines. "If midshipmen are persons of integrity, and if we stand for that which is right, then we must stand for each other," the script reads, in part.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 29, 2014
Last Friday, the White House announced an "It's On Us" initiative aimed at combating sexual assaults on college campuses. I'm all in favor of combating sexual assault, but the first priority in combating a problem is understanding it. That's not the White House's first priority. Roughly six weeks before Election Day, its chief concern is to translate an exciting social media campaign into a get-out-the-vote operation. Accurate statistics are of limited use in that regard because rape and sexual assault have been declining for decades.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The Baltimore Sun won an Online Journalism Award Saturday for Matthew Hay Brown's 2013 article, " Breaking the Silence ," about American servicemen who were sexually assaulted while serving in the military. Women in uniform are more likely to be sexually assaulted than men. But because there are many more men than women in the military, there are more assaults against men than against women. And when the victim is a man, Brown's reporting showed, a perpetrator is far less likely to be punished.
NEWS
By Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley | September 26, 2014
You've heard the statistics: one in four women will be raped in college Or is it " sexually assaulted or almost sexually assaulted"? Or is it "nearly one in five"? Or "one in six"? According to the White House, a rape epidemic is sweeping college campuses , with the #YesAllWomen campaign calling all men weapons of mass destruction. Let's look at some facts. According to the FBI "[t]he rate of forcible rapes in 2012 was estimated at 52.9 per 100,000 female inhabitants.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
NEWS
By Jenny Gaeng | October 25, 2011
The Sun has invited participants in the Occupy Baltimore protest to submit occasional articles describing their experiences, ideas and goals. This one, from Baltimore resident Jenny Gaeng , provides one protester's perspecti ve on a memo circulated at the protest that drew criticism for apparently suggesting that any allegations of sexual assault at the encampment be handled internally and that victims not call police. Well, it's finally happened.  Occupy Baltimore, the 100-person occupation fighting valiantly to stay abo ve water, has made the national news.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
While the Obama administration presses colleges and universities to respond more aggressively to sexual assaults, students who are attacked at Baltimore-area schools are unable to get rape kit exams on their campuses. Instead, they must go to a hospital off-campus - an extra step that advocates for victims say deters at least some from reporting the crime. The question whether schools should offer the exams is the subject of a national debate that is dividing school administrators, nurse examiners and advocates - with victims falling on both sides.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced sweeping changes to the NFL personal-conduct policy Thursday, writing in a letter to NFL owners obtained by The Baltimore Sun that discipline for domestic violence incidents will increase significantly. The NFL will suspend first-time offenders for six games. A second violation would result in a lifetime ban, though players could file for reinstatement after one year. "Violations of the Personal Conduct Policy regarding assault, battery, domestic violence and sexual assault that involve physical force will be subject to enhanced discipline," Goodell wrote in the letter.
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