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By Gwendolyn Glenn | October 8, 2012
Venus Theatre owner Deb Randall has done it again with another insightful and entertaining production, "Devil Dog Six," that she not only directs and produces but stars in as well. Randall and five other actors play numerous roles in the show, from trainers and jockeys to horses that neigh, stomp and race around a circular platform in high-stakes races played out on stage. The play, which runs through Oct. 28 at the C Street theater, takes the audience on a dramatic journey, where the supernatural, a bit of mystery and themes of racism, sexism and gambling addiction come to life in often-times explosive ways.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
OK, I admit it. While the rest of the civilized world was glued to the Super Bowl, the TV in our house was emanating the glow of period drama -- the irresistible "Downton Abbey" on PBS. (I still think the Most Valuable Player Sunday night was Mrs. Hughes, the housekeeper who managed to tackle sexism, anti-Catholicism and smug-ism all in one fabulous game.) For the benefit of those who have not yet caught onto the Downton phenomenon -- and even more for the benefit of those who have -- Midweek Madness offers this unique introduction/recap/documentary:
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NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz & Lee S. Weinberg | June 16, 1995
CBS' UNCEREMONIOUS dropping of evening news anchor Connie Chung is generally cited as a prototypical example of sexism. Even TV Guide reports that Ms. Chung alleges that "sexism had played a role in her being fired, citing the example of Barbara Walters."The analogy is correct, but the conclusion is incorrect. Whatever sexism was involved, occurred when Ms. Chung was selected for the job. Her firing merely confirmed that she was the wrong choice -- not because she was a woman.Yet, one might still make a strong argument that CBS discriminated against Ms. Chung because of her gender.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | October 8, 2012
Venus Theatre owner Deb Randall has done it again with another insightful and entertaining production, "Devil Dog Six," that she not only directs and produces but stars in as well. Randall and five other actors play numerous roles in the show, from trainers and jockeys to horses that neigh, stomp and race around a circular platform in high-stakes races played out on stage. The play, which runs through Oct. 28 at the C Street theater, takes the audience on a dramatic journey, where the supernatural, a bit of mystery and themes of racism, sexism and gambling addiction come to life in often-times explosive ways.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 10, 1991
In that strange land known as Political Correctness, events are moving toward a useful showdown. By the end of January -- by next spring at the latest -- we should get some idea of the limits of the new racism within the federal government. I say, high time.2 James J. Kilpatrick is a syndicated columnist.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Admitting formally for the first time the existence of sexism within the Roman Catholic Church, the nation's bishops voted overwhelmingly yesterday to encourage women to seek positions of leadership within the church other than the priesthood.Sexism, they said, "goes against the will of Christ." However, the bishops did not give any hint that they are willing to challenge the Vatican's long-held doctrine that the priesthood is for men only.The bishops' action, taken at their semiannual meeting, marks their response to a letter written in May by Pope John Paul II in which he "definitively" ruled out the ordination of women.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 23, 1992
PRIME SUSPECT" is the TV thriller of the year.The four-part British-import, which premieres tonight at 9 on Channels 22 and 67, has memorable characters, rich detail of cops in squad rooms and bedrooms -- and it just never lets up in the suspense department. One other thing: "Prime Suspect" is surely the most intelligent and multifaceted dramatic exploration of sexism ever seen on American television. Ever.There is a murder and an investigation to find the murderer. This is, after all, part of the PBS "Mystery" lineup.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 8, 2007
ATLANTA -- America has an odd relationship with gender equality. While other nations have already placed women in the equivalent of the Oval Office, this country has just gotten around to putting a woman at the helm of the House of Representatives. Nancy Pelosi is the first female speaker of the House in U.S. history. In that role, the California Democrat stands second in the line of succession; she would become president if both President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney died or were incapacitated.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1996
The topic of this talk show has never aired on "Oprah" or "Ricki Lake."Viewers who watch a Cable 15 show this month can learn what's bothering Howard County's teen-agers: sexism, racism, teen violence and discrimination against youths.During the nearly two-hour taping of "Youth Rap III" last week, middle and high school students talked candidly about the problems facing teens today.More than 50 youths attended the rap session in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City that was sponsored by the county executive's ad hoc committee on human rights.
FEATURES
By Mike Duffy and Mike Duffy,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 2, 1992
In the long run, surviving can be its own sweet reward.And Barbara Walters knows a little something about surviving.She survived the mistreatment of persistent sexism in the working world of the "Today" show at NBC, where testosterone ruled the airwaves during the 1960s and early 1970s.She survived the mean-spirited backbiting of jealous male colleagues after becoming a million-dollar anchorwoman for ABC News in 1976.And she survived blistering pop culture parody -- being roasted to sarcastic perfection by Gilda Radner on "Saturday Night Live."
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 27, 2011
In its decision to throw out the sex discrimination lawsuit filed by 1.6 million women workers against retail giant Wal-Mart, the Supreme Court concluded that there was insufficient evidence that each of these women - who worked at different jobs and in different states - had been harmed in the same way. In other words, in order to file a class-action suit, the plaintiffs must have more in common than just their sex. And, by the way, they need...
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 5, 2009
Wall Street titan Bernard L. Madoff proved you can take an outstanding reputation and ruin it overnight. Now Roland Burris has demonstrated that even a mediocre reputation can be instantly destroyed. Mr. Burris is the prototypical time-serving career politician who owes his success to being simultaneously ambitious and bland. He has never been one to challenge the status quo, but no one underestimates his self-esteem. The two Burris children, after all, are named Roland and Rolanda. The result of his immodesty has been a persistent hunger for offices that most people thought beyond his abilities.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 20, 2008
The National Organization for Women convenes its annual conference this weekend in Bethesda against the backdrop of a presidential race that, according to NOW President Kim Gandy, has been underlined not only by one woman's historic campaign but also by an extraordinary amount of sexism. Gandy, who's serving her second term at the helm of the feminist advocacy group, talked with The Sun about those and other topics. She lives in Silver Spring with her husband and two daughters. Your theme for this weekend's conference is "No Capes, No Masks, No Boundaries: Feminist Super-Women Unite!"
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun reporter | June 26, 2008
The Anne Arundel County official who filed a federal complaint accusing her supervisors of racial and sexual discrimination suggested yesterday that prejudice was systemic in other departments of the county government. Rene C. Swafford, an African-American, said her former boss at the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp. gave away her office and job duties to white employees and canceled her corporate credit card without warning. She also alleged that she had been passed over for a promotion, then demoted in favor of a white employee.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
When Sen. Barack Obama (above) clinched the Democratic Party presidential nomination last week, it was a moment of overwhelming joy for some - and devastating disappointment for others. A sampling of the reactions around the country: "Perhaps we are getting to that day Martin Luther King talked about. It's a day that goes down in history, no matter what happens." - N. Charles Anderson, president of the Detroit Urban League "This is about feeling that the party completely disrespected us, let us down, and we don't feel that we want to be with the party."
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker' | March 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Change agents running for president probably would do well to leave the ghosts of crises past stashed in the attic. Instead, Sen. Hillary Clinton's latest stumper, Gloria Steinem, is a vision from a time that is, as Sen. Barack Obama's youthful contingent would say, "so yesterday." Appearing in Austin before the Texas primary, Ms. Steinem's words on Mrs. Clinton's behalf merely served to remind young voters why they prefer Mr. Obama. Indeed, the race and gender dimensions of the presidential campaign have been important mostly to an older generation of Americans, including the Clintons, who are slow to recognize that the world they sought to change has, indeed, changed.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | November 19, 1992
ATLANTA -- The middle-aged mother who bore kids straight out of high school declares women at 30 are too old to have children. The professional woman who prides her independence insists careers should come before babies.The female lawyer gets judged by her appearance. The teacher who shuns makeup is mocked.Blondes are thought to have more fun, but "brainy" brunettes thank God they're not "bimbos."The stealth war between females is constant. Women target each other's hair, clothing, figures, husbands, houses, children, wedding rings and family choices.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
Donna Jackson used to get mad when she walked past the popular poster with "U.S.D.A. Choice" stamped across a naked woman. Then she got even.She learned to slap a "This Insults Women" sticker on blatantly sexist advertisements, and passed on the hint in a handbook she wrote for women. Called "How to Make the World a Better Place for Women in Five Minutes a Day," the little guide is filled with helpful tips to stop sexism, sexual harassment, unequal pay and poor health care for women.It grew, she said, out of her lingering anger over the way Anita Hill was treated during the televised Senate confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 8, 2007
ATLANTA -- America has an odd relationship with gender equality. While other nations have already placed women in the equivalent of the Oval Office, this country has just gotten around to putting a woman at the helm of the House of Representatives. Nancy Pelosi is the first female speaker of the House in U.S. history. In that role, the California Democrat stands second in the line of succession; she would become president if both President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney died or were incapacitated.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Staff | October 8, 2006
It used to be that young women visiting New Orleans' notorious French Quarter had no use for T-shirts whatsoever. But when Christine Mallinson and a couple of her friends from graduate school toured the tourist traps of Bourbon and Decatur streets last March, the Hurricane Katrina T-shirts hanging in windows or on street kiosks grabbed their attention. The shirts, the women felt, ridiculed storm victims: I survived Katrina and All I Have Left is this Lousy T-Shirt (Seriously ... this is it ... )
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