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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
I am 7 years old, sitting on a cast-off dining chair that screeches like a banshee when it's pushed across the concrete floor. My feet do not reach the floor, but that's OK, because the sewing machine I am sitting in front of has a knee lever. Press it with your knee, and the machine sews. Press it harder and the machine sews faster.The machine, my mother's old White, is black metal with gold scrollwork. I am making doll clothes. I don't like dolls, but that is how you learn to sew when you are 7; you make teeny tiny ball gowns.
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February 22, 2012
The sewing lounge Sassy SEWer in Parkville has eight sewing machines for customers, but when Tamara Woods goes, she takes her own. It's not just about the machines, she said. "It's about the dedicated time with other sewers. We all like to do this. We chat. It's fun," she said. At home, she sews for other people. At Sassy, she works on raising her skill level and she sews things for herself, combining craftsmanship with fashion sense. "I love the technical part. But it's the creative part that takes over.
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FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 2, 1997
As research gives new insights into the past, information about antiques is always being updated.For many years, collectors prized the furniture made by P. Mallard. Records show he was in New York in 1829 but by 1832 was working in Louisiana. His store moved up and down Royal Street in New Orleans until 1874.Mallard made rococo and Renaissance Revival-style Victorian furniture with elaborate carvings. He was known in some directories as Pierre Mallard, but many collectors believed his name was Prudence.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 14, 2011
Apparently Brazil has enough umbrellas or maybe it just doesn't like outsiders sending pointy items in the mail. The international mail company DHL has sent along a list of items that aren't allowed to be shipped to certain countries. If you send one of the forbidden items, you could find it back on your doorstep. DHL, which delivers to more than 220 countries and territories, says these items are verboten: Mexico - computers, liquids and minerals France - imitation pearls containing lead salts (Mon Dieu, if you're sending a mademoiselle jewelry, make sure it's the real thing!
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | April 2, 1995
Q: I have a collection of tins including those that held spices, tea, coffee, lard, biscuits and so forth. Do you know of a book I can purchase which describes, lists, and prices such items?A: A new book that pictures and describes tins, with their prices, is "Antique Tins -- Identification & Values" by Fred Dodge. It is available for $26.95 from Ace Enterprises, P.O. Box 59354, Chicago, Ill. 60659.Q: I have inherited a Singer sewing machine figural music box made to commemorate Singer's 100th (1851-1951)
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2002
To add to his list of retirement activities, 76-year-old Charles Moranville recently picked up sewing. To be more specific, the Eldersburg resident picked up sewing machines. Moranville, who retired 12 years ago from Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (now Honeywell Corp.) in Columbia, began collecting sewing machines in December for transport to Haiti. The machines will be distributed to mothers in the poverty-stricken nation with the hope that they will use them to make clothing for their families.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | September 8, 1991
Q: I received this Hummel Madonna as a gift while in Germany in 1955. Two appraisers have been unable to tell me anything about her. She is ivory with a light brown glaze and the model number is 10/3 with the Full Bee mark.A: This Flower Madonna was made in several colors, including the light brown you describe. It would sell for about $650 -- twice the price of the white version.Q: The attached mark is on the bottom of a china pitcher. It is decorated with two male figures and bunches of grapes with leaves.
NEWS
May 5, 2006
Disabilities ministry to hold workshop "Transformed!" - the disability outreach ministry of New Spirit Community Church - will hold a session of disability awareness training tomorrow for Christian and church ministries on issues facing people with disabilities and their families and what churches and church members can do to help. The workshop will be led by Sib Nafziger Charles, program director for Joni and Friends, Eastern Pennsylvania, an organization that works to evangelize people with disabilities.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking sounds of Brother sewing machines, with Maryland state and U.S. flags draped over tables and chairs The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking of sewing machines. Maryland and U.S. flags are draped over tables and chairs, and sewing patterns for the cross bottony, the red-and-white cross on the state flag, are hung neatly in a corner of the room.
FEATURES
By The Sewing Fashion Council/Orlando Sentinel | April 22, 1993
Some facts about sewing:* About 60 percent of U.S. households have one or more sewing machines, while only about 51 percent have a VCR.* More than 150 million patterns are sold a year.* Thirty percent of U.S. households buy goods by the yard at fabric stores.* The Old Farmer's Almanac predicted home sewing would be a hot fashion trend in 1988 and the following few years, "with new emphasis on style and originality rather than just saving money."* Fortune Magazine 1991 Investor's Guide listed fabric retailing for home seamstresses as one of the seven most promising industries for 1992.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking sounds of Brother sewing machines, with Maryland state and U.S. flags draped over tables and chairs The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking of sewing machines. Maryland and U.S. flags are draped over tables and chairs, and sewing patterns for the cross bottony, the red-and-white cross on the state flag, are hung neatly in a corner of the room.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
Every other week, quilters gather in a sun-drenched community room that overlooks their Harford County homes. They will spend a few hours sewing and socializing ever aware they are stitching with a purpose. Like the quilting bees of old that provided families with warmth and comfort, the group, which meets at the Residents' Club at Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, puts together coverlets that will ultimately let a wounded veteran sense the care and gratitude of a stranger. The quilters, typically women but with a few men, are making "Quilts for the Injured Soldiers Project.
NEWS
May 5, 2006
Disabilities ministry to hold workshop "Transformed!" - the disability outreach ministry of New Spirit Community Church - will hold a session of disability awareness training tomorrow for Christian and church ministries on issues facing people with disabilities and their families and what churches and church members can do to help. The workshop will be led by Sib Nafziger Charles, program director for Joni and Friends, Eastern Pennsylvania, an organization that works to evangelize people with disabilities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 5, 2004
Whether you are an accomplished seamstress or a neophyte, volunteers are welcome to join the fourth annual Quilt for Charity tomorrow at Calvary United Methodist Church in Gamber. "You don't have to be a quilter to help," said Genie Corbin, who helped found the Calvary Quilters about a decade ago. "People with no experience can help." Those who do not sew can iron fabric pieces and finish the quilts by tying layers together. "You have to tie about every 5 inches," Corbin said. "It would be a valuable, time-consuming service."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 11, 2002
In a famous essay, "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," the writer Walter Benjamin hailed the invention of photography as herald of a new era in human history in which images would become infinitely reproducible and available to everyone. Today we are thoroughly immersed in that ocean of imagery Benjamin foresaw; picture-making on a mass scale -- by the camera, the printing press and, more recently, the computer -- has made photographs into mass-produced objects that shape the way millions of people around the world see themselves and each other.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2002
To add to his list of retirement activities, 76-year-old Charles Moranville recently picked up sewing. To be more specific, the Eldersburg resident picked up sewing machines. Moranville, who retired 12 years ago from Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (now Honeywell Corp.) in Columbia, began collecting sewing machines in December for transport to Haiti. The machines will be distributed to mothers in the poverty-stricken nation with the hope that they will use them to make clothing for their families.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2001
"GIVE A MAN a fish," the saying goes, "he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime." That was the idea behind a recent outreach project sponsored by Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church in Glen Burnie - one involving sewing machines rather than fishing poles. Late last month, four volunteers traveled from Maryland to Haiti. In earlier trips there, parish members had worked with Holy Trinity's sister parish, St. George in the community of Basin Bleu. With each trip, the overwhelming needs of the community continued to inspire volunteers to do more, according to the coordinator of the project, David E. Smith, who has made six trips to Haiti.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 14, 2011
Apparently Brazil has enough umbrellas or maybe it just doesn't like outsiders sending pointy items in the mail. The international mail company DHL has sent along a list of items that aren't allowed to be shipped to certain countries. If you send one of the forbidden items, you could find it back on your doorstep. DHL, which delivers to more than 220 countries and territories, says these items are verboten: Mexico - computers, liquids and minerals France - imitation pearls containing lead salts (Mon Dieu, if you're sending a mademoiselle jewelry, make sure it's the real thing!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
There were no labels on the quilts. No "Made by the ladies of St. Michael Lutheran Church in Perry Hall." No "Sewn by Agnes" or "Knotted by Elaine." No embroidered initials of the 13 women whose lined and spotted hands had produced these patchwork gifts for strangers. Last year, 150 quilts wrapped in weatherproof plastic were loaded onto a container ship and sent across the ocean. When the ship reached shore and the quilts were distributed, the men and women who received them would know only what they could see: simple designs, eclectic blends of fabric, machine-sewn stitches and hand-tied knots of yarn.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 16, 2001
The Pajama Game may be a classic musical comedy, but when audiences enter Center Stage's Head Theater for this season-opening production, they'll see anything but a classic set. Instead, they will find themselves facing a gargantuan sewing machine. Well, not the whole machine - just a few important features, specifically a 25-foot aluminum needle, pressure foot and an enormous bolt of striped fabric, crafted out of laminated wood. "It is as if that bolt is being unfurled and sent through the sewing machine to become pajamas ... as if the sewing machine has been made so huge that that's all of it that can be in this building," says Walt Spangler, the show's New York-based set designer.
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