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NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2003
HEADS BENT over, two women sat on pink chairs at an old wooden table, snipping and matching colorful pieces of fabric and felt. In the middle of the table, a pile of canvas tote bags waited for artistic touches to be added by the day's visitors to And Sew It Goes, a new quilt shop in Historic Savage Mill. In three hours, 25 bags were decorated and ready to be delivered to Howard County General Hospital's Breast Care Center. Carolyn Schoenian, the shop's owner, used the Mill's annual Parade of Trees on the weekend before Thanksgiving to kick off her mission to help fight breast cancer as she pursues her dream of running a needlecraft store.
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NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
On most days, Tony Wheeler of Arnold is a guide for a company that offers historic tours in Maryland. But on Sunday, Wheeler became part of history himself. Wheeler, wearing a top hat and early 19th-century attire, joined hundreds of volunteers at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore to help sew a reproduction of the original Star-Spangled Banner. "This is the first time I sewed in my life," said Wheeler, 78, after adding his stitch to the hem of the flag. The project is part of events marking the bicentennial of the War of 1812.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 25, 2008
Foreign competition and state regulation haven't completely wiped out Maryland's once-storied needle-trade industry, but the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation is working on it. It wants to raise taxes on Alice's Home & Cottage, a small Hagerstown company that sells period clothing to Monticello and Colonial Williamsburg and buys work from dozens of nearby women who lost jobs when the sewing mills closed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Mildred Kern, an original resident of the North Oaks Retirement Community who had worked overseas for the United Nations, died of heart disease Sunday at her home. She was six days short of turning 105. "She was our oldest resident, and she was our very first resident," said Mark E. Pressman, the retirement community's executive director. "She and her sister actually moved in before the building was finished. She showed the first apartments at times and was actively interested in our growth.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
Some write, some paint. Faith Brooks Evans sews. Since high school, Brooks has been captivated by the creative possibilities of designing and making clothing.While a student at Morgan State in the 1970s, she staged fashion shows featuring her handiwork and later studied couture at the Paris Fashion Institute. Brooks, a special education teacher at Mergenthaler Vocational Technical High School, also teaches sewing in her home, makes outfits for her two daughters, designs costumes for school plays and has completed a cloak for her pastor, the Rev. Harold Carter of New Shiloh Baptist.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 21, 2008
Dorothy Moulton Rankin, a retired federal worker who taught sewing in Africa and owned a tailoring and fashion shop in Baltimore in the 1970s and '80s, died July 14 at her home in Reisterstown after suffering a heart attack. She was 84. Dorothy Moulton was born in Baltimore and attended St. Barnabas Catholic and Baltimore City public schools. She graduated from Frederick Douglass High School in June 1942 and married William Rankin six years later. Mrs. Rankin became interested in sewing in high school, learning from her mother and making clothes for peers and family members, according to her sister, Lillian Wainwright of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2003
Ann Sherman Wolcott, At Aberdeen Proving Ground's chapel yesterday, the meeting room was humming with three dozen military wives who were ironing, measuring, cutting and sewing more than 200 yards of fabric into red and white flags. Others, including a few children, were painting wooden rods to hold the flags. And at the end of the assembly line, Elaine Valentin sat down at her sewing machine to realize a dream: to make a flag for every family who has lost a loved one in Iraq or the war on terrorism.
NEWS
June 14, 2001
An illustration in yesterday's Today section of Mary Pickersgill sewing the flag that inspired the "Star-Spangled Banner" should have been credited to the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1996
Goldie Hinton didn't shop for clothes. But she'd roam the fabric stores, carefully inspecting and selecting the materials and patterns for the dresses and blouses she sewed."
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1996
STUDENTS AT Mount Airy Middle School were given an opportunity to see the inside of "Miss Betty's Colonial Trunk" and learn about everyday life during the 1700s.The cultural arts program was presented Wednesday by independent performer Betty Jackson, who played the role of Miss Betty.She shared her many Colonial-era artifacts with the seventh-graders, who had a chance to participate in craft workshops in which they made and used Colonial items.The students tried their hand at dipping candles, printing wallpaper and writing with quill pens.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
The 2014 Maryland governor's race has been shaping up so far as a fight about inevitability. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler long fostered the sense of his own lock on the job through a massive campaign war chest. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown countered by becoming the first to officially enter the race, more than a year before the Democratic primary. Meanwhile, an assortment of potential Republican candidates and two other Democrats - Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and Del. Heather Mizeur - have been trying to make the case that an underdog could win. Now Mr. Brown is seeking to tilt the inevitability scales permanently in his favor with his planned announcement Monday that Mr. Ulman will join him as his running mate.
EXPLORE
May 20, 2013
Harford Community College students created fleece no sew "comfort" blankets to donate to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center's pediatric emergency department on April 25.
FEATURES
By Megan Isennock, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
You know those nightmare wedding scenarios in movies where the music gets louder and the actors are sweating a little and everyone is in disarray? And you're watching thinking , that would never happen ? (I'm looking at you, Jennifer Lopez's character in “The Wedding Planner”….) I am here to tell you that it  does  happen. This weekend my friend Laura got married, and I was a bridesmaid. Save for some varying degrees of hangover from the super-fun rehearsal dinner at Cinghiale, everything was going well and according to plan.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
The sewing lounge Sassy SEWer in Parkville has eight sewing machines for customers, but when Tamara Woods goes, she takes her own. It's not just about the machines, she said. "It's about the dedicated time with other sewers. We all like to do this. We chat. It's fun," she said. At home, she sews for other people. At Sassy, she works on raising her skill level and she sews things for herself, combining craftsmanship with fashion sense. "I love the technical part. But it's the creative part that takes over.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
Nadia Karber spread yards of purple fabric across a sewing table, with all manner of lines marking inches. She measured and remeasured to assure accuracy before carefully pinning pattern pieces to the material. Then, from a sturdy apron this 9-year-old had just made for herself, she pulled out her sewing scissors. Just as she was set to cut, her teacher whispered, "Measure again. Your lines are not quite straight. " "I try to save them from their mistakes," said Peggy Steinberg.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking sounds of Brother sewing machines, with Maryland state and U.S. flags draped over tables and chairs The sew shop at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup is alive with the ticking of sewing machines. Maryland and U.S. flags are draped over tables and chairs, and sewing patterns for the cross bottony, the red-and-white cross on the state flag, are hung neatly in a corner of the room.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 29, 1994
Channel chic: Broadcast television has a fashion show, "Main Floor," a syndicated magazine format half-hour that focuses on names and how-tos. In a video world where Elsa Klensch does high fashion, MTV does hip and QVC does home, "Main Floor" does mainstream.Each weekly episode includes beauty hints, shopping tips, a look at new products and backstage talks with designers, movers and models.Producers promise fashion chat for the guys, the almost forgotten television fashion audience. Sunday's segment goes to the MAGIC show in Las Vegas, a huge design and trade presentation of menswear lines that draws top manufacturers of everything from boxer shorts to tuxedos.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | March 3, 2002
Sewing is one of those things we often wish we could do well yet never seem to find the time to learn. But for aspiring designer Ashley Holt, it's her ticket into college. "I sent in pictures of things that I made for myself along with fashion sketches," says the 18-year-old Fallston High School senior. "And I got accepted into the fashion-design program at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City" -- the school for future fashionistas. Holt's been sewing since sixth grade, honing her skills by "trial and error" and turning them into quick cash -- by setting up an embroidery business on the side -- and one-of-a-kind clothing.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Every other week, quilters gather in a sun-drenched community room that overlooks their Harford County homes. They will spend a few hours sewing and socializing, ever aware that they are stitching with a purpose. Like the quilting bees of old that provided families with warmth and comfort, the group, which meets at the Residents' Club at Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, puts together coverlets that will ultimately let a wounded veteran sense the care and gratitude of a stranger. The quilters, mostly women but also a few men, are part of the "Quilts for the Injured Soldiers Project.
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