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NEWS
By Elisabeth Orr and Elisabeth Orr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 26, 1997
More than six months after the city was ordered to improve its antiquated water and sewer system, Taneytown has received a $450,000 state grant to help pay for a $4 million waste-water treatment plant expansion.The 40-year-old system has been blamed for a series of incidents after heavy rains last year in which raw sewage backed up into the basements of homes and untreated waste water flowed through drainage ditches.In November, Taneytown officials signed an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment, promising to improvethe system by 1999.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
Faced with the failure of more than a quarter of the septic systems in two northern Carroll communities, the county Health Department has recommended construction of a public sewer system. Edwin Singer, director of the county's environmental health division, called the 27 percent failure rate high - the average is about 3 percent. More than 70 percent of the homes in Union Mills and Silver Run were built on small lots with no space to build replacement systems. "Our recommendation is based on the public health implications and our survey," Singer said at a public meeting with about 60 residents Monday night.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
More than three million gallons of raw but diluted sewage spilled into the Patapsco River and Jones Falls during and after Tuesday's near-record downpour, city officials reported Friday. An overflow at the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant in Wagner's Point dumped about three million gallons into the river before it was stopped after nearly five hours, the Department of Public Works said. Another overflow at a pumping station at Patapsco Avenue and Shell Road, less than a half mile away, spilled 170,300 gallons of untreated sewage into the river before it was halted early Thursday, the department said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
Baltimore will spend $475,000 to study its aging sewer system, which has caused more than 16 million gallons of raw sewage to be dumped into waterways over the past five months. With legal pressure building from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment, the city Board of Estimates unanimously agreed yesterday to an emergency spending request to hire engineers to examine ways to upgrade and maintain the system. The board approved a contract with Metcalf and Eddy Services of Baltimore to inspect and determine priorities for repairs to the 3,100-mile system.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
Baltimore County has tentatively agreed to make more than $800 million in repairs and improvements to its aging sewer system and to pay a $750,000 fine for past sewage spills under a proposed settlement with state and federal environmental agencies and the Department of Justice. The consent decree, scheduled for discussion at Tuesday's County Council work session, would require county officials to not only fix and upgrade the system - a network of 3,000 miles of sewer lines and 111 pumping stations that handle about 40 billion gallons a year -but to look for potential problems before they occur.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE | December 30, 2005
About 22,000 gallons of untreated sewage was dumped into the Jones Falls at 3300 Clipper Mill Road on Wednesday and early yesterday morning after a sewer line broke. The overflow came as the city's Department of Public Works works on a $900 million upgrade of the sewer system. In 2002, Baltimore officials signed a consent decree with the Environmental Protection Agency to eliminate overflows. A city spokesman said the overflow occurred on a sewer line that is being replaced and was contained by 3:30 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1999
Baltimore County officials plan to impose a moratorium on sewer hook-ups to shut the door to new development in the environmentally sensitive Bowleys Quarters and Back River Neck peninsulas.County officials say the moratorium, to be introduced as a bill at tonight's County Council meeting, is needed to curb growth on the two peninsulas, where a sewer system is being built to replace failing septic systems.The moratorium would prohibit building on 1,100 lots along the two peninsulas.The sewer system was intended to serve only the 1,200 existing homes, but has the capacity to serve twice that number, said Michael H. Davis, a spokesman for County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1998
Residents of the Cranberry section in Westminster applauded yesterday the county's long-delayed decision to extend public sewer service to their neighborhood.The $570,000 plan is designed to solve years of health and environmental problems caused by leaky, failed septic systems."The stream that flows behind my house has become so !B contaminated that nothing lives in it," Lester Stem, a lifelong Cranberry resident, told the County Commissioners during a public hearing on the plan yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
The Baltimore County Council imposed last night a four-month moratorium on sewer hookups on the Bowleys Quarters and Back River Neck peninsulas, an effort to shut the door to development of up to 1,300 lots in the environmentally sensitive areas.The moratorium, approved by a 6-0 vote, is intended to curb growth on the two peninsulas, where a sewer system is being built to replace failing septic systems.The measure suspends new sewer hookups, needed to build homes, while the county Planning Board comes up with growth management controls for the communities.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Inspectors will begin examining small sewer lines leading to at least 9,000 homes in Baltimore under a new five-year initiative Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is set to announce Tuesday. The Department of Public Works is expected to begin the inspections in North Baltimore's Idlewood neighborhood in the coming weeks. Inspectors will use cameras to check for blockages in the lateral lines that connect underground pipes from houses to the sewer system. The workers won't need access to homeowners' properties, nor will the inspections involve tearing up streets or sidewalks, said Jeffrey Raymond, a public works spokesman.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A plan aimed at fixing a large number of failing household septic systems on Kent Island is stirring debate, as Queen Anne's County looks to permit roughly 600 new homes on the low-lying gateway to the Eastern Shore while hooking existing homes up to its sewer system. County officials say the $53 million state-financed sewer project, made possible by legislation passed this year, would resolve a long-standing public health and environmental problem while limiting how much new development can take place in an area virtually surrounded by the Chesapeake Bay. But opponents say the project flies in the face of Maryland's Smart Growth policies and rewards real estate speculators who've been sitting on unbuildable housing lots there for years.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Charlotte Lubbert came to Edgewater from Crownsville on Wednesday with two issues in mind: pollution flowing into the Severn River and speeding boaters she expects to see on the water on the Fourth of July. She wanted to take her concerns to the top, so she waited in line to speak with County Executive Laura Neuman at a community outreach session at South River High School. "I'm absolutely thrilled with her and her approaches," Lubbert said as she waited to speak with Neuman.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 8, 2012
The Harford County public and municipal elected officials in Aberdeen, Bel Air and Havre de Grace need to pay particularly close attention three bills on water and sewer issues that are scheduled for hearings before the Harford County Council this Tuesday, March 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Though the bills to some degree reflect a move in the general direction of a unified water system for the county, the question whether the county needs such...
NEWS
February 21, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion and controversy in the Maryland General Assembly and in the counties about growth-related strategies. Some say they take away private rights; others, that these strategies save money and protect our water. Since we all want to have clean water and save on government expenditures, why not support smart growth initiatives? There is an effort to do this through bills in the legislature, House Bill 445 and Senate Bill 236. Both these measures call for managing growth by limiting sprawl development.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar | September 8, 2011
A large volume of sewage, which could be approaching 1 million gallons, spilled into a Southeast Baltimore creek throughout Thursday, said a Department of Public Works official. The overflow started about 8 a.m., coming from a pipe that leads to an underground vault in the 2200 block of Broening Highway and flowing into Colgate Creek, said DPW spokeswoman Celeste Amato. Public Works is working to re-route the sewage flow until the spillage stops, she said. When flow levels decrease enough, the department will be able to diagnose the cause of the overflow and provide a final estimate of the total spill volume.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
Union Bridge is collecting only 66 percent of the revenue needed to run its water and sewer system, town officials learned last night.The mayor and town council received the news during a 48-minute work session to discuss the need to raise the town's water and sewer rates.If the town's 365 water customers share a $26,850 operating shortfall equally, they would have to pay an extra $73.56 per year each. Likewise, the town's 355 sewer customers would have to pay an extra $114.51 annually to cover a $40,650 operating shortfall.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Staking out one of his legislative priorities in this year's General Assembly, Gov. Martin O'Malley argued Monday that rural development using septic systems needs to be curtailed to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and to preserve the state's remaining farmland from suburban sprawl. O'Malley joined with environmental activists and green-leaning lawmakers to defend the bill he has introduced, which would ban any new major housing projects on septic. It also would require less-polluting but more costly septic systems on smaller housing developments or individual homes not affected by the ban. The governor said he wanted to end a "proliferation" of new housing on septic systems, which allow up to 10 times as much water-fouling nitrogen to leach into streams per household as do homes hooked up to public sewage treatment plants.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 14, 2010
"Capture a Lake Bonnie memory," the flier reads. Tucked away "in the heart of the Eastern Shore," the wooded campground in northern Caroline County offered swimming, fishing and boat rentals on a 28-acre man-made lake. It was, says owner Gail Litz, a "home away from home" for dozens of families, many from Baltimore. Memories are all that's left now of Lake Bonnie Campsites. The lake, the heart of the campground, was declared unfit for swimming or wading in 1996 because of sewage leaking from failing septic systems in Goldsboro, about a mile away.
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