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NEWS
August 30, 1995
Annapolis officials yesterday rescinded a threat to suspend sewer service to the Naval Academy and agreed to continue negotiating a billing dispute with the school.City Attorney Paul G. Goetzke said city officials would meet with the Department of the Navy to discuss the academy's complaint that it was overbilled $357,000 when a problem in a sewage pipe falsely inflated meter readings.The city council denied the academy a $150,000 settlement last month, and the Navy vowed to stop paying its full sewer bills unless the figures were revised.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Dull though the subject matter may be, it would be hard to overstate the potential impact on Harford County of a consolidated, countywide water and sewer system. Running a municipal water system that meets the demands of large swaths of the populace, and then dealing with the wastewater that goes down the drain, are among the least flashy aspects of government. As a result, unless there's a problem - like the recent one in West Virginia - resulting in large numbers of people being without clean water, or instances where raw sewage fouls a public waterway, municipal water and sewer issues are not the stuff of commonplace political conversation.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
The Howard County Council took a first step last night toward bringing public water and sewer service to rural residents whose wells are polluted or threatened with contamination.The five-member council, without debate, voted unanimously to amend the county's master plan for water and sewer service to include Clarksville business owners and Marriottsville residents who live near the county's Alpha Ridge landfill.Toxic contaminants have been discovered in test wells at the landfill. Although none have been found in nearby residential wells, residents fear their wells could become polluted soon and have asked for public water.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 16, 2014
Delaying action on spending more money on plans for a countywide consolidated water and sewer agency was the prudent thing for the Harford County Board of Estimates to do. Before the Board last week was a contract with a Bowie firm for $831,000 to put together the organizational infrastructure of what is proposed to be a semi-autonomous county water and sewer authority that would consolidate the management of the various water and sewer systems serving...
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 9, 1993
An article in Friday's Howard County section about a proposal to bring sewer and water service to Clarksville's business district incorrectly characterized Susan Gray's testimony. Ms. Gray said only two of the properties cited by the Health Department showed levels of contaminants higher than federal drinking water standards.* The Sun regrets the error.County officials want to extend water and sewer service to Clarksville's business district to cure ground water contamination problems, Planning Board members were told yesterday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 28, 2000
The Westminster Common Council introduced a proposed budget of about $17 million for the coming fiscal year that will not increase city property taxes but will increase costs of water by 5 percent and sewer service by 3 percent. The two utilities are required to be self-supporting. A public hearing on the spending plan will be at 7 p.m. May 8 at City Hall. Copies of the budget are available. It is expected to be adopted at the May 22 council meeting. At a work session April 17, the council was able to square a $952,000 difference between requests and expected revenues by delaying some projects and by reducing the amount of next year's expenditures for others.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
In an unexpected move, two Howard County councilmen have filed proposed legislation that would hinder Covenant Baptist Church's plan to build a church, school and senior housing complex on its Centennial Lane property in Ellicott City.The church's plans for housing for the elderly were already in danger because the county Planning Board had recommended against the project. Now, the church's long-planned and previously approved church building and church school are also in jeopardy.Democrat Guy J. Guzzone of southeastern Howard County and Republican Allan H. Kittleman of western Howard filed a bill Friday that would remove the church's land -- about 53 acres -- from access to public water and sewer service.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
The County Commissioners gave final approval yesterday to a long-delayed plan to extend public sewer service to 19 homes in the Cranberry section of Westminster.The $570,000 project is expected to solve years of health and environmental problems caused by leaky, failed septic systems in the Cranberry area.The county will install a low-pressure sewer system extension for homes along Old Manchester Road east of Lucabaugh Mill Road, just outside the northeast limits of Westminster. The extension will become part of the Westminster sewer system.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Taneytown City Council, under pressure from government agencies to generate more income from sewage fees, voted to increase rates last night.The council raised water and sewer rates from $1.95 to $2 for each 1,000 gallons used. Water and sewer rates for the city's 1,776 customers are combined because the city meters each customer's water use and assumes sewer use to be equal.City officials expect the 5-cent increase to generate about $10,000 more each year. The money will be used for operation and maintenance expenses, said City Manager Charles "Chip" Boyles.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
A plan to provide sewer service to 19 homes in the Cranberry area outside Westminster is stalled while city and county officials squabble over funding of a repaving project.The sewer project has emerged as the city's ace in a months-long dispute with the county over the resurfacing of Lucabaugh Mill Road.The sewer and repaving projects have nothing to do with one another, but they became linked after county and city officials began arguing over funding responsibilities for both.The county wants a price break on sewer hookups on Old Manchester Road, where homeowners have been waiting more than eight years for service.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
More than 16,000 Anne Arundel County homeowners who pay for unmetered sewer service but not public water probably will see their wastewater bills drop by about one-third, after the county auditor's office said they were paying too much. "They have been overcharged because their consumption was overstated by 50 percent," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said. Those customers probably will see wastewater bills decrease by more than $160 a year, as the county agreed with a recent audit recommendation to reduce the usage estimate at the root of the audit's findings.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 24, 2012
The addition of 69 new houses to the area in Fallston bounded by Routes 1, 152 and 147 is lately drawing fire from a community irritated by an existing problem with traffic, but there's no good reason at this late date in the process for the Harford County government to do anything to stop the proposed development. As a practical matter, the addition of that many houses is going to have a relatively minimal impact on an already congested area. The reason the area is a problem now isn't because someone is proposing a few houses that will be the straws that break the camel's back.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Baltimore County Council on Monday made significant changes to a measure involving the county development approval process after preservationists said it would undermine an essential county growth-control tool and could run afoul of state law. Originally, the bill sponsored by Councilmen David Marks and Tom Quirk would have allowed development outside a growth-management boundary adopted 45 years ago, but the council removed that provision under...
EXPLORE
February 15, 2012
Having fallen for the hollow promise of easy residential development money years ago, the Havre de Grace city government is in the unfortunate situation of not being able to pay the debt service on what it has spent to make that development possible. Going back when Havre de Grace embarked upon the building boom that started with Bayview Estates and Grace Harbour, the city was limited in its ability to provide public services - specifically sanitary sewer service - to a large number of new homes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 14, 2010
State Sen. Allan H. Kittleman's third annual attempt to get Howard County's General Assembly delegation to approve a utility tax break bill failed Wednesday, with only the county's three Republican legislators backing it. The bill would have given county government the ability to grant the break to people who get public water but not sewer service. Ulman administration officials have said that carving out a tax break for one group of people would set a precedent for similar tax breaks for other groups who do not directly benefit from a particular tax. But since this is an election year, the Republican senator sees some potential benefit, even from the 7-3 party-line vote that killed the bill.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2007
It has been a long time since anything related to Turf Valley, the luxury planned community and resort in Ellicott City, has been treated as routine. And tomorrow will be no different when the County Council holds a hearing on legislation to, in effect, extend public water and sewer to about 70 acres in the sprawling development. The legislation is largely regarded as pedestrian because most of the 800-plus-acre development is served by public water and sewer. Technically, the three bills, introduced by Councilman Calvin Ball on behalf of County Executive Ken Ulman, would add the property to the Metropolitan District, an administrative act that would permit the county to charge the developer a fee for public water and sewer service.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Carroll County's newly constituted Planning and Zoning Commission moved swiftly in showing its slow-growth muscle last week, quashing a 10-lot Eldersburg subdivision supported by residents and approved by the county attorney.The 4-2 vote was the commission's first since County Commissioners W. Benjamin Brown and Richard T. Yates added two new members and an alternate to the panel Aug. 26 -- appointees they believe will support a slow-growth agenda.The selections paid dividends immediately.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
The Carroll County commissioners have signed an agreement that would provide sewer service for Francis Scott Key High School, but complained about the terms demanded by the town of Union Bridge, where the sewage treatment plant is located. Union Bridge has yet to sign the agreement - and the commissioners' addition of a last-minute $7,000 limit on legal and consulting fees could delay or defeat it when the Town Council meets tonight, said Union Bridge Mayor Bret D. Grossnickle. Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said the town took advantage of having the county over the proverbial barrel.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
Malvo transferred back to Va. prison ROCKVILLE -- Convicted Washington-area sniper Lee Boyd Malvo has been moved from a Maryland prison back to Virginia after his trial for six 2002 sniper killings, officials said yesterday. Lt. Gregory Henderson of the Montgomery County Sheriff's Department said Malvo has been transferred to Virginia. He would not say when or how the transfer occurred, saying further details would be released today. Malvo, 21, was sent to Maryland from a Virginia prison in May last year to stand trial in the sniper shootings in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2005
A controversial resolution that would define the authority of the Baltimore County Council to extend public water and sewer service to rural areas was scrapped yesterday - hours before it was scheduled to vote on the matter. With a majority of the council's seven members either opposed to the resolution or in favor of tabling it, and one working on changes to the measure as recently as Friday, council Chairman Joseph Bartenfelder said he decided to withdraw it. "To leave it out there and try to work on it tonight, there would be last-minute decisions," he said, leaving no chance for community input in what has been an emotional debate over the sanctity of the county's nearly four-decade-old growth boundary.
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