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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County residents will soon pay more for drinking water and for flushing toilets. The county is proposing to raise water and wastewater rates by about 5 percent when the new fiscal year begins July 1. Water rates will be increased from $2.68 per 1,000 gallons to $2.81 per 1,000 gallons. Wastewater rates will go up from $4.71 per 1,000 gallons to $4.94 per 1,000 gallons. A proposed 15 percent increase in Baltimore City's water rates is only a minor factor in the decision to raise Anne Arundel's rates, according to Matt Diehl, a spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
The 7,000 households in Carroll County that receive public water from Liberty Reservoir are expected to see a slight increase in the water and sewer bills. The county is expected to adopt the new rates as part of its budget on Tuesday, May 28, said Roberta Windham, a county spokeswoman. New rates would take effect July 1. Carroll County buys water from the Baltimore Department of Public Works, which announced Monday it will seek a 15 percent increase for city water and sewer customers.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
Manchester Councilman John A. Riley, who oversees the town's water and sewer systems, told the Town Council last night he is unhappy with water and sewer rates proposed by the ad-hoc committee on water and sewers."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County residents will soon pay more for drinking water and for flushing toilets. The county is proposing to raise water and wastewater rates by about 5 percent when the new fiscal year begins July 1. Water rates will be increased from $2.68 per 1,000 gallons to $2.81 per 1,000 gallons. Wastewater rates will go up from $4.71 per 1,000 gallons to $4.94 per 1,000 gallons. A proposed 15 percent increase in Baltimore City's water rates is only a minor factor in the decision to raise Anne Arundel's rates, according to Matt Diehl, a spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
Harford County residents will pay more for public water and sewer service beginning next year as part of a $46 million upgrade to the Sod Run Wastewater Treatment plant.The Harford County Council passed the new water and sewer rates at its meeting Tuesday. Council President Joanne S. Parrott left early to attend to an "urgent matter" and did not vote.Water and sewer bills for the county's 28,000 customers won't rise until next year. Revenues from the increased rates will help pay for the upgrade of Sod Run and for increased operating expenses.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 29, 1993
Most Manchester water and sewer users will face only a moderate rate increase under new fees approved by the Town Council Tuesday -- but big increases may be in store in future years, warns Town Manager Terry L. Short.He said the new rates "may let us limp through this year, but will mean substantial increases in future years."The Town Council approved a water rate structure that consists of a flat quarterly fee of $9.60, plus $1.74 per 1,000 gallons used. The new rate is less than the $1.87 rate that had been proposed at an earlier meeting.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | April 24, 1991
The City Council had good news and bad news when presenting its proposed budget for public digestion Monday night.The good news:The proposed spending plan for fiscal 1992 calls for the city's property tax rate to remain at 91 cents per $100 of assessable value.The bad news?The measure includes a recommended 21 percent increase in city sewer service rates, though water rates are requested to stay the same."The reality of it is, when it's only pertaining to the sewer rates, . . . the total the bill reflects to the user is not that much," said Councilman William F. Haifley, chairman of the three-member Finance Committee.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
An article in Wednesday's Carroll editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the cost in Westminster of water and sewer service for a household using 14,000 gallons of water. The correct amount is $66.23.The Sun regrets the error.Water and sewer rates are once more on the agenda for the Manchester Town Council, which meets today at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall.Tonight's agenda also includes discussions about a council vacancy, water meters, and a strategic planning workshop.The council has been discussing water and sewer rates for months, however, and it is not clear whether any final decision will be made tonight.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
With spending requests higher than projected revenues, the Westminster Common Council approved almost $1 million in cuts last night to balance next year's proposed budget. No change in the property tax was proposed, but water and sewer rates would increase under the new spending plan for the fiscal year that begins July 1, said Councilman Gregory Pecoraro, who heads the finance committee and outlined the plan at a work session last night. Water and sewer budgets -- about $3.8 million and $3.7 million respectively for next year -- must be self-supporting.
NEWS
By Katherine A. Richards and Katherine A. Richards,Staff Writer | May 11, 1993
Manchester residents will have a chance tonight to express their opinions on the town budget, the local real-estate tax rate and water and sewer rates for the coming year in a public hearing after the regular council meeting.The hearing will start at 8 p.m. in the town hall, at 3208 York St.At 7:30 p.m., the council meeting will begin with an executive session. A brief business meeting will follow."We're not going to try to pass water and sewer rates" at the meeting, Town Manager Terry Short said yesterday.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies and a chance of showers, with a high temperature near 81 degrees. Thursday night is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low temperature around 68 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... First black Naval Academy graduate dies : Wesley Brown started at the academy in 1945, after the first five black men to attend failed to complete their first year there.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
For the fourth consecutive year, Baltimore officials are proposing a 9 percent increase to water and sewer rates — and the charges will continue to grow indefinitely to cover the costs of major projects, they say. The proposed rate increases come as the Department of Public Works has been grappling with high-profile billing problems that have been attributed to faulty water meters, outdated computer programs and, in some neighborhoods, fictitious meter...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Baltimore residents will see a 9 percent jump in their water and sewer bills beginning Thursday, the first in a series of increases planned for the next five years. The city Board of Estimates voted 3-2 Wednesday to approve the rate increase to help fund repairs to the city's pipes, the majority of which are more than 65 years old. The typical family of four would pay about $80 more next year under the new rates, said Kishia L. Powell, who directs the water and wastewater division of the city's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
With the Baltimore area's aging water system failing "at an alarming rate," public works officials are seeking a 9 percent rate increase to help finance water main replacements and other improvements. The proposed water and sewer rate hike, to start July 1, would trigger higher bills for 1.8 million customers in the city and several surrounding counties. Annual bills for the average Baltimore family of four would increase by $81, according to the public works department. Officials said the extra money would help to combat leaks and other problems in a system that has had more than 1,300 water main breaks over the past year — including several high-profile cases.
NEWS
By KATHERINE SHAVER and KATHERINE SHAVER,Washington Post | March 6, 2009
As of yesterday morning, the utility that oversees the crumbling water system in Montgomery and Prince George's counties wasn't going to receive a dime in federal stimulus grants because the state had decided the two Washington suburbs were too wealthy. But by the end of the day, state officials promised to reconsider their funding formula after an outpouring of complaints from local officials and members of Maryland's congressional delegation. Under current state plans, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC)
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
Soaring fuel prices and electricity rates contributed to the 12 percent increase in Carroll County's minimum combined water and sewer rates that were approved by the board of commissioners Thursday, officials said. The new rates go into effect July 1. The base quarterly rates have risen from $7.64 to $8.23 for water and from $10.06 to $11.61 for sewer services, according to county statistics. A utilities enterprise fund -- separate from the county budget -- has $20 million in it for next year, a 5.4 percent increase over this year, to cover the county's water and sewer operating costs and capital projects, financed in part by connection fees and the increased rates.
NEWS
April 26, 2007
A chart on regional water and sewer rates in the April 19 editions included the most current front-foot fees. For the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, only a small portion of customers pay those fees.
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