Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSewer Bills
IN THE NEWS

Sewer Bills

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 5, 1993
In a bid to save time and money, Manchester plans to switch this month to using postcards to bill water and sewer customers.Town Manager Terry L. Short said the town could save about $800 a year by sending bills on postcards instead of in window envelopes -- even after paying to mail the town newsletter separately. The newsletter has been mailed with the water bills.Mr. Short said it costs about 55 cents to print and mail each bill. Switching to postcards will cost about 22 cents to print and mail each bill, plus about 13 cents to mail each newsletter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
We have been reporting on Baltimore City's water billing errors since the release of a scathing audit in February.  We have looked at the struggles residents face as they fight to get their bills corrected, profiled a local activist who has called attention to billing problems for years and spoken with the recipients of a whopping $1.4 million online water bill .  But one ramification of the billing mistakes that we...
Advertisement
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1995
Anne Arundel County lawmakers tonight may reject a call by some of their colleagues to refund $700,000 to homeowners in Linthicum and Broadneck who were charged retroactively for sewer and water service at the county's new, higher rate.The County Council is to vote on a resolution criticizing County Executive John G. Gary for including a 13.5 percent rate increase in those homeowners' water and sewer bills for April, May and June even though the increase did not go into effect until July 1. The resolution also calls for the refund.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Thousands of Baltimore County residents have probably paid hundreds of dollars too much for their use of the city's public sewage system - and most are not even aware of it, county officials acknowledge. More than 200,000 county households get their water from Baltimore City, where an error-prone billing system overcharged its customers in both jurisdictions by at least $4.2 million in the past few years. But in Baltimore County, the errors are multiplied because of the method sewer charges are calculated for these customers: The county's budget and finance office multiplies the city-issued water bills by three.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Thousands of residents of the Freedom Area, Carroll's most populous region, could see their water and sewer bills swell by as much as 10 percent this summer. The county commissioners are weighing a proposal that would change the method used to calculate the rates for public water and sewer service. The method, which officials called complex, was adopted in 1972. Under the method proposed by O'Brien & Gere Engineers Inc., a Landover consulting firm, rates for moderate and high volume users -- those who use more than 10,000 gallons of water per quarter -- would jump by as much as 10 percent.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Annapolis homeowners could see their annual water and sewer bills go up by as much as $67 over the next five years under a plan recommended by engineering consultants.The study by Kansas City-based Black & Veatch Corp. suggests raising the rates by 44 percent this year up to a total of 62 percent to 67 percent by 2004 to enable the Department of Public Works to repair sewer and water pipes without digging into reserve funds or borrowing. The study is to be presented to the city council Monday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2004
Pushing aside the misgivings of the Ehrlich administration, legislative leaders said yesterday that they plan to make homeowners with septic systems pay the same surcharge to protect the Chesapeake Bay as those on public sewer systems. Sen. Paula C. Hollinger and Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, who are chairwomen of the Senate and House committees handling Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s bill creating a fund to upgrade the state's sewer systems, said the legislation will be amended to ensure that septic system owners do not escape the fee. The legislation, Ehrlich's top environmental initiative of the 2004 session, has won praise from the Democrats who control the General Assembly - even as they labeled it a "flush tax."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2007
A chart on regional water and sewer rates in the April 19 editions included the most current front-foot fees. For the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, only a small portion of customers pay those fees. Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon put on hold yesterday part of a proposed three-year, 30 percent water and sewer rate increase so that the city can review whether it is collecting more money than it needs from ratepayers - temporarily defusing a politically touchy dispute over water bills.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
We have been reporting on Baltimore City's water billing errors since the release of a scathing audit in February.  We have looked at the struggles residents face as they fight to get their bills corrected, profiled a local activist who has called attention to billing problems for years and spoken with the recipients of a whopping $1.4 million online water bill .  But one ramification of the billing mistakes that we...
NEWS
February 14, 1997
Taneytown residents no longer will be able to pay water and sewer bills at local banks.The City Council voted Monday to drop the quarterly bank payment option, effective with next month's water and sewer bills.City officials reported that communication glitches with banks caused the city to send overdue notices to several customers who had paid their bills.The city signed an agreement with local banks in January 1995 to collect payments as a convenience to customers.Residents may mail their bills, pay them at City Hall during business hours or leave payments in a 24-hour drop box at the city office entrance, 17 E. Baltimore St.Project Liberty Ship to hold fund-raiserProject Liberty Ship, a preservation group working to save the Liberty ship S.S. John W. Brown, will hold an Adopt-a-Rivet program at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8806, Penrose Street, Union Bridge.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
State lawmakers have told Baltimore officials they can't seize houses for unpaid water bills so quickly, or for so little money owed . Under legislation that gained final approval this week in the Senate, the city would be able to enforce a lien on a home only if the owner were at least nine months behind and owed more than $350 in outstanding water and sewer bills. That's slightly more generous than current law, under which the city may take a home if the bill is just six months behind and totals $250 or more.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Fewer homes would be subject to tax sales under a compromise reached by legislators and property investors, officials said yesterday. Responding to cases in which local governments -- primarily Baltimore -- have foreclosed on homes over small debts, including unpaid water and sewer bills, legislators have coalesced around a bill that would increase the threshold for debts that can trigger a tax sale, cap attorneys fees and provide a safety net for the...
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and June Arney and Laura Smitherman and June Arney,Sun reporters | February 28, 2008
State lawmakers are considering a moratorium on foreclosures stemming from unpaid water bills, a move that faces stiff opposition from Baltimore City officials who say that many property owners would not pay without the threat of losing their homes. Sen. James Brochin called Baltimore's tax-sale system under which homeowners face foreclosure over unpaid water and sewer bills "absolutely obscene." He said the city should rely on other means of leaning on residents who don't pay their bills, such as shutting off service or assessing late charges and liens that must be paid when a property is sold or refinanced.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2007
A chart on regional water and sewer rates in the April 19 editions included the most current front-foot fees. For the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, only a small portion of customers pay those fees. Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon put on hold yesterday part of a proposed three-year, 30 percent water and sewer rate increase so that the city can review whether it is collecting more money than it needs from ratepayers - temporarily defusing a politically touchy dispute over water bills.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | April 12, 2007
City officials defended yesterday their policy of selling delinquent water bills and other small debts to private debt collectors along with back-tax bills, saying Baltimore would possibly jeopardize its finances if it can't use the threat of foreclosure to collect overdue bills. Their comments came during a hearing of the City Council's Taxation and Finance Committee on a proposal by Bernard C. "Jack" Young, the 12th District councilman, to eliminate water-bill liens from the city's annual tax sale.
NEWS
April 8, 2007
If you live in Baltimore and don't pay your water bill, you could lose your home - even if you're as little as $100 in arrears. That simply has to change. A recent report in The Sun outlined the dire consequences of citizens' failure to pay water bills, and it prompted Mayor Sheila Dixon to suggest an amnesty program for those with burdensome bills. But ultimately it will take more than that to protect homeowners and at the same time ensure that the city isn't left holding the bag. It will require changes in state law and reform of the convoluted system the city uses to collect some municipal bills.
NEWS
October 11, 1992
Harford residents will not be allowed to pay their property taxes, water or sewer bills with a credit card.The County Council voted 6-0 last Tuesday to reject a resolution that would have allowed the credit card payments, saying it didn't want Harford "to get into the credit card business."Some council members also said they were concerned that the bank would get the payments before the county did, delaying the county's receipt of payment.Such payments are allowed under a new state law sponsored by state Sen. William H. Amoss, D-Harford, and Sen. Walter M. Baker, D-Cecil County, but on the condition that the jurisdiction passes specific legislation.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
MANCHESTER -- Town residents were warned at the beginning of the month to expect a bit of sticker shock when they opened their water and sewer bills."Sticker shock?" said Augusta Road resident Pat Wallman. "This is more like cardiac arrest."A whole lot of folks are clutching their chests as they ponder significantly higher bills that are due today.A standing-room-only crowd of nearly 90 residents came to Town Hall last night to complain of water and sewer bills that have doubled -- or tripled -- for families and businesses.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
UNCLE SAM should be ashamed of himself. The citizens of Maryland, hoping to speed cleanup of the quickly deteriorating Chesapeake Bay, agreed last year through their representatives in Annapolis to pay a special fee for the purpose: a monthly surcharge on water and sewer bills known informally as the "flush tax." Yet the initiative is undermined because federal agencies, which operate some of the biggest polluters in the bay watershed, are balking at paying their share. President Bush should take the advice of Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest and order the Navy, NASA and other deadbeat agencies to pay up before they deal what the Eastern Shore congressman called a "highly detrimental blow to the cooperative spirit of the user-fee initiative."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.