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Sewage Treatment

NEWS
July 21, 2006
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Vice President Dick Cheney both have weekend retreats on the Chesapeake Bay at St. Michaels. Could that be why the scofflaw Pentagon has agreed to ante up its share for upgrading sewage treatment plants that drain into the bay? Whatever it took was influence well spent. A silly semantic dispute worthy of neither politicians nor lawyers was shelved in favor of a $22 million commitment by the Defense Department to clean up its act at five installations in Maryland over the next four years.
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NEWS
By TOM HORTON | November 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- You might think a Saturday observing pump maintenance is a less-than-fulfilling autumn weekend. But when a major city's raw sewage is backing up inches away, and the main pump handling it has just gone down, and you have scant minutes to ready and install a replacement or face reading damning headlines in next morning's paper, it is the best show in town: "Prime it, prime it, PRIME IT! Bolt OUT! Filter in! Air good! Five, six, seven, eight - DONE!" Wrenches flashing, grease guns clacking, the Seacoast Sewer Snakes, a crack team out of New England, swarm the big Godwin Dri-Prime 2600 emergency pumping unit with the vigor and precision of a NASCAR pit crew.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Over the last two years, scientists working on the Potomac River have netted 111 smallmouth bass with bizarre sexual traits. The fish were males but had eggs growing inside their testes. Researchers found many of these gender-bending bass downstream from sewage treatment plants in water tinged with a chemical called ethinylestradiol - the active ingredient in birth control pills. More studies are necessary, biologists say, but evidence is mounting that trace levels of prescription drugs in rivers and streams may be harming fish, tadpoles, frogs, mussels and oysters.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
At Historic London Town and Gardens, the Colonial seaport outside Annapolis, even the new building isn't entirely new. It's mostly an abandoned sewage treatment plant. Within weeks, construction of the $5.1 million visitor center-museum-archaeology lab will be nearly finished, with most of the work done below ground - turning what used to be a concrete vault nobody wanted to talk about into a place officials hope will be a hub of discussion. "It just breaks my heart when I see these sewage treatment plants going to waste all over the country," said the man who conceived of building in the plant, Jack Keene, chief of planning and construction for the Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By William C. Baker | June 29, 2005
OUR GOVERNMENT'S record has not engendered much trust when it comes to saving the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. Very few affordable, science-based solutions to pollution problems have been implemented, despite their availability. And time is running out. Five years ago yesterday, state and federal leaders who served on the Chesapeake Bay Executive Council ratified the Chesapeake 2000 Agreement (C2K). The overarching promise of C2K is to improve water quality to rid the bay and its rivers of persistent dead zones by 2010.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
Environmental Protection Agency officials said yesterday that they would not adopt the recommendations outlined in a recent lawsuit aiming to protect the Chesapeake Bay from sewage pollution, arguing that the agency is doing enough to combat water-quality problems. The lawsuit, which the Chesapeake Bay Foundation filed in November, sought to force the Bush administration to place discharge limits on sewage treatment plants, which dump large amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus into the bay and its tributaries.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
CENTREVILLE -- State environmental regulators say traces of a banned pesticide found in soil, water and sediment samples taken at an abandoned Eastern Shore dump near here are within acceptable standards and pose no threat to public health or groundwater. The tests, conducted by an independent laboratory, were ordered by the Maryland Department of the Environment last month after rusted barrels that once contained the chemical Toxaphene were found in a wooded ravine adjacent to a 300-acre spray irrigation field that is part of Centreville's new wastewater treatment system.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2005
Owners of a Carroll County plant want to burn more than 100 tons a day of dried, sanitized sewage from Baltimore's wastewater facilities to make cement, a proposal that the company insists is safe but that has raised concerns from residents. Lehigh Cement Co. is proposing to use the pelletized sludge - known as a "biosolid" - as an alternative or supplement to the coal it burns in kilns at its factory in Union Bridge, in Western Carroll. Lehigh, which is based in Allentown, Pa., has asked Carroll County for zoning approval to build two 130-foot silos, one of which would store as much as 400 tons of biosolids.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
The Carroll County commissioners have signed an agreement that would provide sewer service for Francis Scott Key High School, but complained about the terms demanded by the town of Union Bridge, where the sewage treatment plant is located. Union Bridge has yet to sign the agreement - and the commissioners' addition of a last-minute $7,000 limit on legal and consulting fees could delay or defeat it when the Town Council meets tonight, said Union Bridge Mayor Bret D. Grossnickle. Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said the town took advantage of having the county over the proverbial barrel.
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