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NEWS
September 23, 1990
MANCHESTER - The hunting of rabbits and small game -- now outlawed on town property -- could be allowed on about 172 acres of town-owned land this fall.A request from residents to hunt the newly acquired spray-irrigation farmlands southeast of Manchester will be considered by the Town Council during its regular meeting Wednesday night.Hunting is not allowed within town limits. In fact, the council three years ago turned down a hunting request.The 172 acres of land -- actually three tracts southeast of the town's Beaver Street sewage treatment plant -- were purchased by the town for about $833,000.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
The federal and state governments agreed yesterday to a $3.5 million settlement in their lawsuit against Baltimore over water pollution at the city's Ashburton drinking water and Patapsco sewage treatment plants.U.S. Justice Department officials said a $1 million penalty was levied against the city -- one of the largest ever against a municipality. In addition, the city -- which approved the settlement last month -- has agreed to spend $2.5 million for three environmental projects."This settlement shows that we are serious about preventing pollution in the bay," said Lois J. Schiffer, the Justice Department's assistant attorney general for environment and natural resources.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
CENTREVILLE -- State environmental regulators say traces of a banned pesticide found in soil, water and sediment samples taken at an abandoned Eastern Shore dump near here are within acceptable standards and pose no threat to public health or groundwater. The tests, conducted by an independent laboratory, were ordered by the Maryland Department of the Environment last month after rusted barrels that once contained the chemical Toxaphene were found in a wooded ravine adjacent to a 300-acre spray irrigation field that is part of Centreville's new wastewater treatment system.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
The Taneytown City Council last night adopted a $1.5 million budget for fiscal 1999 that maintains the property tax rate but increases water and sewer service fees.The budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 is based on a property tax rate of 78 cents per $100 of assessed value. The plan is about $100,000 lower than the current budget.Although the property tax rate remains unchanged, increases in property assessments are expected to raise property tax revenues by $97,000, to $648,000.
NEWS
By Bruce L. Bortz | July 15, 1993
IF ALL goes as planned, Robert (Bob) Perciasepe, Maryland's environmental chief, will be nominated as assistant administrator for water at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).The nomination must be confirmed by the Senate, but the 42-year-old Mr. Perciasepe is no Lani Guinier. And with the strong support of Maryland's congressional delegation, particularly of Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who chairs an appropriations subcommittee that determines the EPA's budget, Mr. Perciasepe probably will begin his Baltimore-to-Washington commute by early fall.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Over the last two years, scientists working on the Potomac River have netted 111 smallmouth bass with bizarre sexual traits. The fish were males but had eggs growing inside their testes. Researchers found many of these gender-bending bass downstream from sewage treatment plants in water tinged with a chemical called ethinylestradiol - the active ingredient in birth control pills. More studies are necessary, biologists say, but evidence is mounting that trace levels of prescription drugs in rivers and streams may be harming fish, tadpoles, frogs, mussels and oysters.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
MANCHESTER -- When she got into the town government racket 28 years ago, Kathryn L. Riley was one of four employees serving 959 residents.She banged out town property tax bills on a manual typewriter, mopped the floor of town hall -- actually the basement level of the town's old post office on York Street -- and even shoveled snow on stormy winter days."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
MANCHESTER -- Residents upset with huge increases in their quarterly water and sewer bills that were due last week may be going into tomorrow night's meeting with Town Council members hoping for a change.But, town officials acknowledge, the chances of their changing those rates -- now among the highest in the county -- are close to none."Money is money, and there's nothing we can do to change that," said Councilman John A. Riley, the Hampstead manager who was instrumental in devising the rates that went into effect for water used during April, May and June.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1999
With hundreds of homes, businesses and offices planned for southern Howard County in the next decade, county and state officials reassured residents and elected officials last night that area sewage treatment plants can handle the growth.County public works officials explained their options, which include a $32 million expansion of the Little Patuxent sewage treatment plant in Savage by 2002, at an hourlong meeting in Ellicott City's George Howard Building.About 25 people attended the meeting requested by two Democratic elected officials -- state Del. Shane Pendergrass and County Councilman Guy J. Guzzone.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The leaders of Maryland, Virginia and Washington pledged yesterday to continue reducing pollution from sewage treatment plants, but did not offer support for a leading environmental group's attempt to require strict limits on nutrients released into the Chesapeake Bay. In their second capital region summit, Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Virginia Gov. Mark R. Warner and Washington Mayor Anthony A. Williams touched on a variety of issues during a...
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