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Sewage Treatment

NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
Residents of Wagner's Point were not surprised to hear that the neighboring Patapsco sewage-treatment plant has triggered a lawsuit alleging illegal pollution.Local folks say they know the plant has troubles. They can smell them.Many in the tiny Curtis Bay enclave -- three blocks of neat rowhouses surrounded by a moonscape of scrap yards and industrial plants -- see the city-run plant as a nuisance and hope the lawsuit will force improvements.But they couldn't understand why the lawsuit, filed Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment, doesn't mention the most obvious feature of living downwind from a sewage plant.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | December 26, 1990
TANEYTOWN - When it rains here, it pours -- right into the tanks of the city's sewage treatment plant.A day of heavy rain can take the aging 36-year-old plant to its limits, filling the 700,000-gallon system with more than 300,000 gallons of rainwater.Up to now, the extra water has proved to be little more than a nuisance to city officials. But in the near future, it could become one gigantic headache."With the way it is now, if we were to get any more growth, we could run out of room," said City Manager Neal W. Powell.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
UNFAIR. That's the word that came to mind this week, reading how federal and state environmental agencies are demanding Baltimore spend $900 million during the next decade to fix its creaky, leaky sewer system. Not unfair to Baltimore, mind you, whose residents pay among the lowest sewer bills on the East Coast. Without this long-overdue crackdown, the city would keep polluting the Chesapeake Bay with overflows of raw sewage. Besides, the city can spread the cleanup costs among more affluent metro counties that are hooked into the city's treatment plants.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
A sewage treatment bill that many environmental advocates are calling the most important piece of legislation in decades is expected to become law next week, inching Maryland closer to its goal of a cleaner Chesapeake Bay. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is scheduled to sign the "flush tax" into law Wednesday in a ceremony at Annapolis City Dock. The event is likely to bring out activists who have been cheering on the Republican anti-tax governor for pushing legislation that should cut in half the nitrogen pollution seeping into the bay. The tax, which will cost Maryland homeowners $30 a year, is expected to raise $65 million for improvements to sewage treatment plants statewide.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
CENTREVILLE -- State environmental officials, who for weeks have been monitoring an ailing sewage treatment plant here that apparently dumped millions of gallons of untreated sewage into a Chester River tributary, have put an indefinite freeze on development that stretched the 45-year-old facility beyond its limits. Town officials, who on April 12 approved a 30-day moratorium on new building permits, signed an unusual agreement yesterday with the Maryland Department of the Environment that will slow the pace of commercial and residential growth in this 210-year-old Eastern Shore town -- at least until the completion of an often-delayed $9.7 million plant.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Maryland's sewage treatment plants will need additional money for upgrades to reduce nitrogen pollution to levels that state and federal regulators are demanding, plant operators said yesterday. But they argued that setting mandatory limits on nitrogen discharges in sewer plant permits is unnecessary because voluntary upgrades are already cutting as much pollution as possible. "We feel that we've demonstrated in Maryland that we can meet the goals through voluntary means," said Michael Bonk, director of Anne Arundel County's utility operations and president of the Maryland Association of Municipal Waste Water Agencies.
NEWS
April 15, 1996
The state Board of Public Works has approved a $400,000 grant that will allow Carroll County to finish construction of a sewage treatment plant for Pleasant Valley.The county had to delay awarding the construction contract in 1995 when the lowest bid came in $485,000 more than the project budget, Public Works Director J. Michael Evans said last week.Pub Date: 4/15/96
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 30, 1998
The state Board of Public Works released $1.16 million in grants yesterday to help pay for sewage treatment plant improvements in Taneytown and Mount Airy.The three-member board authorized Taneytown to spend $553,000 of a $1.6 million grant previously approved by the state Department of the Environment. The city has already received $865,000 of the grant.The board released $611,000 of a $1.3 million grant for Mount Airy. Mount Airy is also borrowing $3.5 million from the state for its sewage treatment project.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
Enviro-Gro Technologies Inc. has appealed a Maryland Court of Special Appeals decision in another effort to get permission to maintain a sludge pit in Taneytown.The company appealed to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court, last week after the Maryland Court ofSpecial Appeals ruled in favor of a Carroll citizens coalition Sept.5.The Court of Special Appeals upheld a county zoning decision thatdenied Enviro-Gro the use of a sludge storage facility on the RobertC. Neal farm off Bear Run Road.
NEWS
April 1, 1996
SHOULD THE chairman of the Carroll County Planning Commission be voting on issues that might help advance his private business interests? More specifically, should he be deciding on land-use reclassifications that would make more attractive an innovative sewage treatment technology his company sells?As chairman of the county's Planning Commission and as principal of Innova Ltd., a company that markets alternative sewage treatment systems, David Duree may find himself presiding over meetings that put him in an untenable position -- ++ choosing between his business interests and the general interests of the county.
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