Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSewage Treatment
IN THE NEWS

Sewage Treatment

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE RECORD | January 24, 2013
It's a matter no one gives a, well let's say hoot, about until there's a problem. When there is a problem with it, everyone affected will be angry enough to call city hall and give the poor soul who answers a blast of, let's just call it hot air. The matter at hand is sewage disposal and treatment, and it appears Aberdeen is at the forefront of making sure no one gets any stink on them from being cavalier about modernization. The city council voted last week to spend up to $96,000 on equipment that will make possible sewer line replacement using a technique called pipe-bursting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 18, 2014
Running a jail is at once among the most unrewarding of endeavors and important functions in society. Regular readers of the police blotter published in this newspaper can attest that, while there are new names in the arrest columns, a disturbing number of people show up with disturbing frequency. If jails were airlines, they would be racking up some serious frequent flier miles. To those working at the Harford County Detention Center, it cannot be an uplifting experience to so frequently see the same un-rehabilitated faces cycling through until they do something bad enough to be sentenced to serious time in the state penitentiary, get themselves killed or maimed badly enough that their street days end or finally grow tired of their own anti-social behavior.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 6, 1998
The County Commissioners have agreed to amend the county water and sewer master plan to allow expansion of and improvements to the Taneytown and Mount Airy sewage treatment plants.Taneytown will build a larger sewage treatment plant about a quarter-mile from the existing facility on Piney Creek near Route 140. The city could not add to the existing plant because it is in a flood plain.Mount Airy plans to expand the daily capacity of its plant from 600,000 gallons to 950,000 gallons and to reduce pollutants discharged into the South Branch of the Patapsco River.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Solar power is going everywhere these days — homes, businesses, schools, even sewage plants. Howard County is beginning work this week installing about 740 photovoltaic panels at its Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Savage. The $1.5 million project will generate a fraction of the power needed by Maryland's fifth largest wastewater treatment plant. Its chief purpose, however, according to County Executive Ken Ulman, is to offset carbon emissions from big new diesel generators being installed to prevent sewage spills like the massive one triggered by Superstorm Sandy last year.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | February 28, 1991
Board OKs expansion for sewage treatmentThe Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $35.6 million expansion of the Patapsco Waste Water Treatment Plant in Curtis Bay, a construction project that will be paid for entirely by Baltimore County.Expansion at the plant, which can process about 70 million gallons of sewage per day, is needed to accommodate rapid development in the Owings Mills area of western Baltimore County, according to George G. Balog, Baltimore's director of public works. The city provides water and sewer service to portions of Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 28, 1991
Fort Meade's former waste water treatment plant supervisor has been convicted of 10 criminal charges for falsifying sewage treatment records and for stealing government property he used in a part-time job at a Jessup motel.A jury returned the verdict against Richard A. Pond, 34, of Laurel last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, concluding a trial that lasted less than three days.Pond was convicted of nine Clean Water Act violations tied t the false reporting and one count of theft of government property for using the Army base's laboratory supplies and equipment to analyze effluent samples for the Parkway Manor Motel, at Md. 175 and Clark Road, where he worked part-time.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | August 31, 2006
The state Board of Public Works approved $23 million in grants yesterday to improve sewage treatment plants, including two operated by Baltimore, as part of the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act, commonly known as the "flush tax." The three-member panel, led by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., endorsed a $5 million grant for the city's Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant, $10 million for its Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant, and $8 million for Bruswick's plant in Frederick County. The money, which comes in part from $30 annual fees collected from homeowners across the state, will pay a portion of the cost for installation of equipment to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus pollution, which cause low oxygen "dead zones" in the bay. Baltimore's plants are the state's biggest.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Wastewater treatment plants in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will have to comply with new pollution limits under a new Environmental Protection Agency policy. The agency announced yesterday that it has reached an agreement in which the six watershed states and the District of Columbia will set limits for the discharge of nitrogen and phosphorus in local waterways. States, which issue the permits, will work with the EPA to make sure they are enforced. "It's a milestone. I think it's unprecedented," said Jon Capacasa, director of the water protection division for the EPA's mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency came to Annapolis yesterday to announce a new $10 million in federal grants for sewage treatment projects in Chesapeake Bay country. But EPA Administrator Michael O. Leavitt refused to say what the total amount for bay restoration will be in the Bush administration's 2005 budget, to be unveiled next week. And despite not-so-subtle pressure from Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - standing beside him at a news conference - Leavitt did not say whether the federal government will make the Chesapeake Bay a national priority on a par with saving the Everglades, nor whether the president will pledge up to $1 billion a year to reduce bay pollution.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
BAYVILLE, N.Y. -- In another effort to clean up Long Island Sound, federal and state environmental officials have adopted a 15-year, $650 million plan to upgrade sewage treatment plants along the New York and Connecticut shoreline.The plan seeks to reduce nitrogen discharges that have been directly linked to a reduced level of dissolved oxygen in the sound, which harms fish, lobsters and shellfish and the small organisms they feed on.The project was approved unanimously at a recent meeting of the Long Island Sound Policy Committee in Manhattan.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 8, 2013
The idea of having Harford County served by a single governmental entity responsible for providing clean water and treating sewage on the whole is a good one. There are, however, aspects of such a system that deserve close public scrutiny as the water and sewer authority is being established. As the water and sewer authority would be managed by an appointed board that will have the authority to set rates, the general public needs to be assured a level of dominion over the service.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE RECORD | January 24, 2013
It's a matter no one gives a, well let's say hoot, about until there's a problem. When there is a problem with it, everyone affected will be angry enough to call city hall and give the poor soul who answers a blast of, let's just call it hot air. The matter at hand is sewage disposal and treatment, and it appears Aberdeen is at the forefront of making sure no one gets any stink on them from being cavalier about modernization. The city council voted last week to spend up to $96,000 on equipment that will make possible sewer line replacement using a technique called pipe-bursting.
NEWS
September 27, 2012
From how we live to where we can live, Marylanders have been expected to make an increasing number of personal sacrifices for the cause of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay over the last two decades or more. Many have been small (whether laundry detergent contains phosphates or not now seems inconsequential), while others, including the cost to homeowners and businesses of greener, more advanced sewage treatment or storm water control systems, have been substantial. But are the state's most egregious polluters - those who truly thumb their noses at laws protecting the nation's largest estuary and knowingly spill noxious materials into the bay and its tributaries - held as accountable?
EXPLORE
July 4, 2012
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, July 5, 1962: A study of the future development and needs of Harford Junior College was presented by Engelhardt and Leggett, an educational consultant firm in New York City, to the college Board of Trustees and the Advisory Board of the College. The report indicated that by 1966 the enrollment of Harford Junior College would reach 700 students, 350 daytime students and 350 evening students, and by 1972, at least 1,000 students would be enrolled.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Record | April 5, 2012
Editor:   The editorial published March 22, in The Aegis and The Record , "A big cleanup," pointed out that the federal money recently made available to places like Havre de Grace isn't nearly enough to clean up the Bay. We agree. But the piece might have given the impression that new grants of up to $750,000 to local governments are the only outside money available to localities to help them undertake cleanup responsibilities. The editorial rightly noted that reducing agricultural pollution is especially efficient, but again implied these efforts weren't receiving much federal and state support.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
The strong smell of human feces that residents of the upscale Villas of Cattail Creek say sporadically seeps out of their new community sewage treatment plant is just the latest indignity after the nearly five years without a working sewage system that preceded it. "It's just never-ending," said Renee Parcover, one of the 55-and-older residents of what was intended to be an idyllic group of 93 retirement homes next to a country club and golf course in...
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | June 12, 1991
The amount homeowners pay to use the town's expanding sewage treatment plant is expected to remain fairly stable over the next few years,as the Town Council approved last night a refinancing of the $11 million bond used to pay for the project.In approving the refinancing of the town's $3 million sewage project loan, the council was able to keep the interest rate on the bond at 75 percent of the prime rate. The prime rate, now lower than 9 percent, is the rate commercial banks charge to their best customers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
The strong smell of human feces that residents of the upscale Villas of Cattail Creek say sporadically seeps out of their new community sewage treatment plant is just the latest indignity after the nearly five years without a working sewage system that preceded it. "It's just never-ending," said Renee Parcover, one of the 55-and-older residents of what was intended to be an idyllic group of 93 retirement homes next to a country club and golf course in...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
Moving to correct a major water pollution problem in some portions of the Chesapeake Bay, the Maryland Senate agreed Monday to require nitrogen-removing technology on all new or replacement household septic systems near the shoreline. Under the bill, which was narrowly approved, the state would cover the extra cost of replacing a failing septic system with an enhanced one capable of removing nitrogen from household wastewater. But homebuyers would have to bear the added cost of about $5,600 for an enhanced system when building a house along the shore.
NEWS
January 18, 2009
Del. Nicholaus R. Kipke, Pasadena Republican, will lead a public briefing by the Anne Arundel County delegation to the Maryland House of Delegates on the condition of the county's public sewage treatment system at 10 a.m. Friday in the Delegation Room of the House Office Building in Annapolis. Kipke has asked the County Department of Public Works and the Maryland Department of the Environment to provide an overview on the state of the system, address concerns over failing pumping stations, and allow for questions from the delegation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.