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By Timothy B. Wheeler | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley has revived a simmering political dispute over the University of Maryland law school's role in a lawsuit accusing an Eastern Shore farm and the Perdue poultry company of polluting a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. In a letter that became public Thursday, O'Malley wrote to law school Dean Phoebe Haddon this week to complain about the "ongoing injustice" of the environmental law clinic pursuing "costly litigation of questionable merit"...
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
A proposal by a Carroll County cement factory to burn Baltimore sewage sludge as a fuel appears to be gathering support after an environmental board unanimously voted in favor of the plan. The Carroll County Environmental Advisory Council recommended Tuesday approving a zoning amendment that would allow the German-owned Lehigh Cement Co. to store pelletized sludge, known as biosolids, at its factory in Union Bridge. "We can go along with the proposal if emissions data are better for biosolids than they are for coal," said Sher Horosko, a member of Carroll Air, a community environmental group that formed about six months ago to fight what members call "constant pollution" from the plant.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
State officials looking to clean up the Chesapeake Bay are weighing a series of new restrictions on how and when farmers can fertilize their fields — and on when municipal sewage treatment plants can spread their sludge on farmland. Draft regulations drawn up by the Maryland Department of Agriculture are drawing fire from farmers and local officials, who say the limits being proposed are onerous, costly and unwarranted. But one scientist said they are backed by research and needed to reduce the pollution fouling the bay. The rules, which have yet to be formally proposed, would, among other things, curtail the practice of fertilizing grain crops that are planted in the fall.
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By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1995
As Harford County's population of 200,000 grows, the number of acres of farmland shrinks. One side effect is that each year the county produces more sewage sludge, but has less farmland on which to spread it.That's why county officials have contracted with the Maryland Environmental Service (MES) to take a look at Harford's future and determine the best and most inexpensive way to handle sewage sludge.The county's Board of Estimates has approved spending$62,000 for the MES report, which is due in 11 months.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
State officials looking to clean up the Chesapeake Bay are weighing a series of new restrictions on how and when farmers can fertilize their fields — and on when municipal sewage treatment plants can spread their sludge on farmland. Draft regulations drawn up by the Maryland Department of Agriculture are drawing fire from farmers and local officials, who say the limits being proposed are onerous, costly and unwarranted. But one scientist said they are backed by research and needed to reduce the pollution fouling the bay. The rules, which have yet to be formally proposed, would, among other things, curtail the practice of fertilizing grain crops that are planted in the fall.
NEWS
February 10, 1997
The Maryland Department of the Environment has renewed Taneytown's permit to transport sewage sludge to Northern Landfill in Reese.The city also has a permit to apply sludge to farmland near Taneytown. The city disposes of sludge at the county landfill only if the weather is unsuitable for land application, according to City Manager Charles "Chip" Boyles.The transportation permit, renewed in December, is valid for five years. Permits for sewage sludge disposal are required under the federal Clean Water Act.Pub Date: 2/10/97
NEWS
April 24, 2005
ISSUE: Lehigh Cement Co. in Union Bridge sought permission from Carroll County officials to build a 130-foot silo to store dried sewage sludge, called biosolids, that the company planned to use as an alternative fuel source to fire its kiln. But the Carroll zoning administrator said county code prohibits the storage of sewage sludge in all zoning districts except at public wastewater treatment plants. Zoning Administrator Neil Ridgely said the plant could build the silo, but that Lehigh could not fill it with pelletized sludge.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
A Pennsylvania company has been fined $50,000 by the Maryland Department of the Environment for improperly hauling and spreading sewage sludge on farmland in Queen Anne's County.The fine is the largest levied by the state against a firm that handles sewage sludge.Ad+Soil Inc. of Kennett Square, Pa., was cited for more than 50 violations of state sludge regulations on 17 sites in the Eastern Shore county. The violations date to April 1991. The state accused Ad+Soil of routinely using leaking dump trucks to transport sludge, frequently spilling sludge on roads, inadequately working the sludge into the soil, and applying sludge on farmland where application was not permitted.
NEWS
December 1, 2002
Delegates to discuss Assembly session with taxpayer group The Carroll County Taxpayers Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster Senior Center. Republican Dels. Nancy R. Stocksdale and Carmen Amedori will discuss the coming Maryland General Assembly session and answer questions. All property owners are welcome. The senior center is at 125 Stoner Ave. Information: 410-840-9699. Hearing slated on request for sewage sludge facility The Maryland Department of the Environment will hold a meeting next week on the Carroll County Bureau of Solid Waster Management's application for a sewage sludge utilization permit.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Farmland across the Chesapeake Bay region is overloaded with phosphorus, a new study by an environmental group finds, indicating that the bay's waters are being polluted by excessive use of animal manure and sewage sludge as crop fertilizers. In a report released Tuesday, the Environmental Working Group says soil data on file at universities show that in one of five counties in the six-state watershed, more than half of all soil samples tested are overloaded with phosphorus, a nutrient blamed for fouling the bay's waters.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 27, 2010
State officials announced Friday that they had fined an Eastern Shore farm couple $4,000 for improperly piling sewage sludge near a drainage ditch. But the Department of the Environment declared it had closed its investigation of the Hudson farm in Berlin with no further action because its inspectors could not say the farm was responsible for pollution found in the ditches draining its land. State inspectors had detected high levels of bacteria and nutrients in the ditches, which ultimately drain into the Pocomoke River.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon | April 18, 2008
Two Maryland lawmakers are asking the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to investigate why a study it funded spread sewage sludge on the lawns of nine East Baltimore rowhouses as part of an effort to combat lead poisoning. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, both Democrats, have written a letter to outgoing HUD Secretary Alphonso R. Jackson seeking answers to safety questions raised by the study. The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee has said it will hold hearings on risks of using sludge as fertilizer.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
Sewage amendment hearing on Aug. 28 County staff recently presented to the county commissioners a proposed amendment to Chapter 223 to make the existing zoning text amendment for the storage of sewage sludge (biosolids) permanent. Currently, the storage of dried, pelletized sewage sludge of a Class A grade or equivalent is allowed under specific conditions, but the current text amendment expires Nov. 4. The proposed amendment would make this provision permanent. A public hearing will be held on the proposed amendments at 10 a.m. Aug. 28 in Room 311 of the County Office Building.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
More toll roads the wrong route After reading the article "I-95 changes rev up drivers" (July 1), I am shocked to see that people are accepting the idea of toll roads. Don't we pay enough taxes in this state!? I can't believe passing the cost on to us is the only way to make this happen. I can't be more opposed to the idea. In my opinion, they should add more roads (general purpose roads, not toll roads!) and try to find ways to add more public transportation in and around Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon | April 18, 2008
Two Maryland lawmakers are asking the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to investigate why a study it funded spread sewage sludge on the lawns of nine East Baltimore rowhouses as part of an effort to combat lead poisoning. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, both Democrats, have written a letter to outgoing HUD Secretary Alphonso R. Jackson seeking answers to safety questions raised by the study. The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee has said it will hold hearings on risks of using sludge as fertilizer.
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