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October 15, 1998
Taneytown officials will spend $27,600 on preliminary engineering studies to rehabilitate sewer mains and other work associated with a new sewage plant.The work is part of a major project to construct a sewage treatment plant and rehabilitate aging, leaking sewer mains that have created backups into homes during heavy rains.The City Council awarded a contract to Acer Engineers & Consultants Inc. of Baltimore.City Manager Charles "Chip" Boyles said the engineering work is required for Taneytown's application for a Rural Development (formerly the Farmers Home Administration)
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
More than three million gallons of raw but diluted sewage spilled into the Patapsco River and Jones Falls during and after Tuesday's near-record downpour, city officials reported Friday. An overflow at the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant in Wagner's Point dumped about three million gallons into the river before it was stopped after nearly five hours, the Department of Public Works said. Another overflow at a pumping station at Patapsco Avenue and Shell Road, less than a half mile away, spilled 170,300 gallons of untreated sewage into the river before it was halted early Thursday, the department said.
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NEWS
February 17, 1997
An aerial photography company is scheduled to photograph sections of Taneytown as soon as snow melts enough to provide clear visibility.Consulting engineers need the photos to pinpoint wetlands and other features that could be affected by Taneytown's plans to improve and expand its sewage treatment plant, City Manager Charles "Chip" Boyles said.The City Council authorized $11,800 for aerial photos of the treatment plant area at its Feb. 10 meeting.Boyles said engineers can use the photos for topographic information, making the aerial survey less expensive than a ground-level survey.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Four of Anne Arundel County's sewage plants have wom awards for meeting pollution discharge permits for several years running. The Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility on the Broadneck Peninsula and the Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility in Churchton earned Platinum Peak Performance Awards from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies. Platinum awards are given to plants with five consecutive years of no permit violations. Broadwater was honored for 17 straight years of compliance with its pollution permits, and Broadneck was honored for having six straight years of compliance with pollution permits.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
A Circuit Court judge declined to dismiss a lawsuit asking the state to penalize the Carroll Board of Education for building a sewage treatment plant at Francis Scott Key High School without proper permits.The Maryland Department of the Environment argued that decisions on penalties should be left to the agency and that the plaintiffs, John and Virginia Lovell of Union Bridge, had no standing to sue.Judge Daniel W. Moylan denied the state's claims, saying the Lovells "clearly have standing to sue."
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
Hampstead Town Council member Wayne Thomas told the Planning and Zoning Commission at its meeting Monday night that the local sewage plant might not have the capacity to serve all the developments the commission has approved.But the Planning and Zoning Commission apparently did not agree, and followed his comments with a 4-0 approval of a site plan for 90 condominium units in Roberts Field."I'm not sure that we have adequate facilities to cover sewer for these units," Mr. Thomas said Monday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 1999
YONKERS, N.Y. -- Sewage treatment plants purify water, but they also foul the air with methane and sulfur and nitrogen oxides, which smell bad and contribute to smog and global warming.Now, a sewage plant here is turning its unwanted gas into electricity and heat. The only byproduct, officials say, is hot water.The new fuel-cell system, the first for a sewage plant in North America, has proved to be effective after a year of operation, officials from the New York Power Authority said. The system generates 200 kilowatts of electricity, enough to supply 60 typical homes, the officials said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
Carroll County officials said yesterday that it probably will take them until next year to investigate options for disposing of sewage from Francis Scott Key High School, where the county built an $800,000 sewage treatment plant that the state has never cleared for use. County Attorney Kimberly Millender told the Carroll commissioners yesterday that to comply with an administrative law judge's ruling that denied the county an operating permit, the county...
NEWS
September 17, 1997
SCIENTISTS say inadequately treated sewage from municipal plants along the lower Pocomoke River is not the major contributor to pollution of that tributary, now closed because of a virulent microbe that kills fish and affects human health.But these specific point-sources of polluting nutrients -- nitrogen and phosphorus -- are identified and most easily corrected. Indeed, their marginal contribution of pollutants to the river may be enough to tip the health of that degraded waterway, even if polluted runoff from farms is blamed for 80 percent of the load.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | October 17, 1991
Municipal sewage treatment plants in Maryland and neighboring states continue to pollute Chesapeake Bay more than they should, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation charged today.In a report reviewing the performance of 160 large sewage plants in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, the environmental group based in Annapolis says that many plants are routinely exceeding state-imposed limits on how much pollution they may discharge. In addition, the foundation contends that those limits often are not nearly as stringent as they should be.Maryland Department of the Environment officials dispute the group's criticisms, saying they are based on outdated information from 1989.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 9, 2014
Nitrogen pollution from Maryland sewage plants and industries increased in 2012, a new report says, partially undermining gains the state has made in prior years in cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. While nitrogen discharges from treatment plants and factories declined overall across the six-state bay watershed from 2011 to 2012, they grew in Maryland, Delaware and New York, according to the Environmental Integrity Project , a Washington-based watchdog...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Solar power is going everywhere these days — homes, businesses, schools, even sewage plants. Howard County is beginning work this week installing about 740 photovoltaic panels at its Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Savage. The $1.5 million project will generate a fraction of the power needed by Maryland's fifth largest wastewater treatment plant. Its chief purpose, however, according to County Executive Ken Ulman, is to offset carbon emissions from big new diesel generators being installed to prevent sewage spills like the massive one triggered by Superstorm Sandy last year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a $75.2 million grant to help pay for upgrading Baltimore's Patapsco sewage treatment plant, Maryland's second largest. The facility, which can treat up to 63 million gallons daily from the city and parts of Anne Arundel and Howard counties, is in the process of improving its removal of nitrogen, one of the nutrients in sewage that can cause algae blooms and other water quality problems in the harbor and the Chesapeake Bay. Roughly half the project's $327.7 million cost is being paid for with grants from the state's Bay Restoration Fund, which draws revenues from the "flush fee" that every homeowner and business must pay. The city is putting up nearly $49 million, with the remainder coming from other loans and grants, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 6, 2012
While Chesapeake Bay pollution from sewage plants and industries has declined overall in recent years, illegal discharges from those sources are still dumping significant amounts of water-fouling nutrients into the troubled estuary, says a Washington-based environmental group. In a new report, the Environmental Integrity Project finds significant gaps persist in Maryland and the other bay watershed states in enforcement of municipal and industrial water pollution, including lax permitting and infrequent inspections.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
An array of solar panels, spreading across nearly five acres at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Essex, could deliver significant energy savings and will pay for itself within a decade, officials said Tuesday. The 4,200 American-made panels, installed in the past three months at a cost of about $4 million, have begun to supply about 5 percent of the energy — up to 1,000 kilowatts per hour — needed to run the plant on Eastern Avenue. The plant serves about 1.3 million residents in the city and Baltimore County and can treat 180 million gallons of sewage a day. It uses the methane byproduct from its treatment process to produce about 20 percent of the power for its equipment.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
With the Chesapeake Bay cleanup at a critical juncture, Gov. Martin O'Malley is calling on Marylanders to double down on their contribution to the effort, proposing to raise the "flush fee" every household pays from $2.50 to $5 a month, on average. Without the increase, administration officials warn, they face a $385 million shortfall starting this year in the funds needed to upgrade pollution controls at the state's biggest sewage treatment plants — most notably Baltimore's century-old Back River facility, the largest in Maryland.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 28, 2007
An Annapolis developer has struck a tentative deal with Constellation Energy to buy the Piney Orchard wastewater treatment plant, gambling that the county will approve his stalled plan to build 1,600 homes near Fort Meade. If the agreement announced yesterday goes through, John C. Stamato would bring sewage service three miles west along a strip of Route 198 where he intends to build Arundel Gateway, a $500 million mix of homes, offices and a town center on 300 acres abutting the Patuxent Research Refuge.
NEWS
By Karen Shih and Jasmine Jernberg and Karen Shih and Jasmine Jernberg,Sun Reporters | August 10, 2008
The Department of Public Works announced a building moratorium for Mayo on Wednesday, seeking to alleviate stress on the overtaxed sewage treatment plant that serves more than 3,000 properties in the area. "It's due to the lack of capacity," said Matt Diehl, DPW spokesman. "No one wanted to declare a moratorium, but it was the responsible thing to do." The department plans to expand the facility in three to five years and has budgeted $31 million for the project, though approval by the Maryland Department of the Environment is pending, said Leslie Campbell, manager of financial services for DPW. The expansion will allow the facility to process 870,000 gallons of sewage a day, up from about 600,000 gallons.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
The strong smell of human feces that residents of the upscale Villas of Cattail Creek say sporadically seeps out of their new community sewage treatment plant is just the latest indignity after the nearly five years without a working sewage system that preceded it. "It's just never-ending," said Renee Parcover, one of the 55-and-older residents of what was intended to be an idyllic group of 93 retirement homes next to a country club and golf course in...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Eleven sewage treatment plants across Maryland have been upgraded, using the state's "flush tax" to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. But as plans move ahead to improve 55 other plants, officials say the costs are likely to exceed the revenue by about $245 million over the next decade. Robert Summers, deputy environment secretary, told the House Environmental Matters Committee that the state has spent $115 million toward the upgrades. In addition to those finished, nine are under construction and 19 projects are being designed.
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