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By Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 5, 2010
A sewer line leak of 25,000 gallons led the Anne Arundel County Health Department to post an emergency closing Friday of Stony Run, a small creek in Linthicum and Hanover. A blockage or buildup of materials caused the leak near Science Drive in Linthicum, said Matt Diehl, a Public Works Department spokesman. The waterway is closed from there to the Patapsco River. Anyone who touches the water should wash well with soap and water, health department spokeswoman Elin Jones said, and clothing that comes into contact with that water should also be washed.
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Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Four of Anne Arundel County's sewage plants have wom awards for meeting pollution discharge permits for several years running. The Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility on the Broadneck Peninsula and the Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility in Churchton earned Platinum Peak Performance Awards from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies. Platinum awards are given to plants with five consecutive years of no permit violations. Broadwater was honored for 17 straight years of compliance with its pollution permits, and Broadneck was honored for having six straight years of compliance with pollution permits.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore city officials belatedly disclosed Friday that sewage overflows topped 12 million gallons during last week's downpour, four times what had previously been acknowledged. It was the most untreated waste reported spilled in the city in a single day since 2006, according to state records. Top managers of the city Department of Public Works just learned Friday of three previously unreported overflows during the Aug. 12 rainstorm, according to department spokesman Jeffrey Raymond.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
When it rains hard, sewage pours in Baltimore, it seems. Nearly 4.7 million gallons of untreated but diluted wastewater overflowed from city sewer lines during Thursday's downpour, spilling down city streets and flooding the lower level of the Penn Station parking garage, a city public works spokesman said Monday. Six different major sewage overflows occurred in the city, according to spokesman Kurt Kocher, with the largest dumping 4.4 million gallons into the Jones Falls in the 400 block of E. Eager St. near the Baltimore Detention Center.
NEWS
March 15, 2010
Baltimore County's Department of Public Works is warning residents to avoid contact with the Patapsco River after 30 million gallons of diluted sewage overflowed into the waterway during the weekend. A dozen pumps at the Patapsco Pumping Station, which is undergoing renovation, were shut down Saturday afternoon to protect them from damage after the melting snow and heavy rain raised water levels, said David Fidler, department spokesman. With nowhere to go, the diluted sewage spilled into the river over a 20-hour period.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood | June 10, 2014
Anne Arundel County public works officials will hold a meeting Tuesday to discuss the recent 312,000-gallon sewage spill into Arnold's Mill Creek. The meeting is planned for 6 p.m. at Anne Arundel Community College in Room 101 of the Florestano Building. On May 27, the Mill Creek Pumping Station lost power to its main electrical lines and its backup generator during a storm, causing untreated wastewater to overflow into the creek. Due to high bacteria counts in the water, Mill Creek and nearby Dividing Creek were closed to direct water contact such as swimming from May 27 through June 4. At Tuesday's meeting, public works officials plan to offer details of the spill and describe an ongoing $9 million construction project at the pumping station.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a $75.2 million grant to help pay for upgrading Baltimore's Patapsco sewage treatment plant, Maryland's second largest. The facility, which can treat up to 63 million gallons daily from the city and parts of Anne Arundel and Howard counties, is in the process of improving its removal of nitrogen, one of the nutrients in sewage that can cause algae blooms and other water quality problems in the harbor and the Chesapeake Bay. Roughly half the project's $327.7 million cost is being paid for with grants from the state's Bay Restoration Fund, which draws revenues from the "flush fee" that every homeowner and business must pay. The city is putting up nearly $49 million, with the remainder coming from other loans and grants, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A sewage overflow estimated at 50,000 gallons was released into Miller Run in west Catonsville, and officials have advised people avoid contact with the waste water. Baltimore County's public works department responded to the sanitary sewer overflow Monday morning. A resident discovered the sewage, which overflowed from a manhole in a right-of-way south of Baltimore National Pike and north of Quilting Bee Road. The overflow was undetected for about seven days; after cleaning roots obstructing the line, the department stopped the overflow at 10 a.m., officials said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
More than 44,000 gallons of sewage spilled near Goucher College in Towson before crews stopped the overflow Monday, Baltimore County public works officials say. Public works officials received a report of sewage odors in the area Aug. 5, and crews tracked the source to a grassy area northwest of the Dulaney Valley and Southerly roads intersection. A root blocking a sewer pipe had caused the overflow, and was cleared Monday afternoon, officials said. The sewage flowed into a grassy area east of Dulaney Valley Road and into Long Quarter Branch.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
More than three million gallons of raw but diluted sewage spilled into the Patapsco River and Jones Falls during and after Tuesday's near-record downpour, city officials reported Friday. An overflow at the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant in Wagner's Point dumped about three million gallons into the river before it was stopped after nearly five hours, the Department of Public Works said. Another overflow at a pumping station at Patapsco Avenue and Shell Road, less than a half mile away, spilled 170,300 gallons of untreated sewage into the river before it was halted early Thursday, the department said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Department of Public Works said it could cost $3 million to fix road damage caused by Tuesday's heavy rainstorm. The most badly damaged road in the county was Marley Neck Road near Marcy Drive in Glen Burnie, which will be closed for "an extended period of time," according to public works officials. Crews need to repair a 12-inch water pipe, an 8-inch gravity sewer pipe, a 32-inch force main sewer pipe and other utilities underneath the road. Other damaged roads could be closed for two to three weeks.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Four of Anne Arundel County's sewage plants have wom awards for meeting pollution discharge permits for several years running. The Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility on the Broadneck Peninsula and the Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility in Churchton earned Platinum Peak Performance Awards from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies. Platinum awards are given to plants with five consecutive years of no permit violations. Broadwater was honored for 17 straight years of compliance with its pollution permits, and Broadneck was honored for having six straight years of compliance with pollution permits.
FEATURES
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
For more than two weeks, 43,000 gallons of sewage spilled into the Gwynns Falls stream through a broken sewer line. Baltimore public works officials said Wednesday they had stopped the sewage's flow, which was reported on July 13 and fixed on July 28. During that time, two gallons of sewage spilled every minute into the scenic waterway as it passes through Carroll Park, officials said. The city is currently using a temporary pipe to fix the problem in the 2100 block of Washington Boulevard, while a contractor works on a permanent repair.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood | June 10, 2014
Anne Arundel County public works officials will hold a meeting Tuesday to discuss the recent 312,000-gallon sewage spill into Arnold's Mill Creek. The meeting is planned for 6 p.m. at Anne Arundel Community College in Room 101 of the Florestano Building. On May 27, the Mill Creek Pumping Station lost power to its main electrical lines and its backup generator during a storm, causing untreated wastewater to overflow into the creek. Due to high bacteria counts in the water, Mill Creek and nearby Dividing Creek were closed to direct water contact such as swimming from May 27 through June 4. At Tuesday's meeting, public works officials plan to offer details of the spill and describe an ongoing $9 million construction project at the pumping station.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay's health remained steady overall last year, despite heavy rains that normally flush pollution into its waters, University of Maryland scientists reported Friday. Declines in Eastern Shore rivers, however, indicated problems with polluted farm runoff there, researchers said. The bay as a whole earned a 45 percent score, a 'C' grade for the second straight year in the annual ecological health checkup performed by the university's Center for Environmental Science.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A blockage in a 12-inch sewer main caused 1.16 million gallons of sewage to overflow into a tributary of Herring Run, according to a statement Wednesday by the Baltimore County Department of Public Works. The sewer line is in the Anneslie-Idlewylde area near the border of Baltimore and Baltimore County, DPW said. The overflow occurred Oct. 12 but was not discovered until Tuesday after an odor complaint was investigated, according to the statement. The line was cleared around 6 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
April 17, 2011
Baltimore's public works department said that a power outage at a wastewater treatment facility caused about 20,000 gallons of sewage to flow into the outer harbor on Saturday. The main power and backup power were disabled from 4:55 p.m. to 5:35 p.m., and 40,000 gallons of sewage flowed from the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant, near Curtis Bay. Half of the spillage stayed on the plant site, while the rest entered the storm drain system and the outer harbor. The spill was caused by a power outage — possibly due to Saturday's storms — and a circuit interruption to backup power, according to the Department of Public Works.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2014
The Army says a 1.8 million gallon overflow of partially treated sewage from a wastewater treatment plant serving Aberdeen Proving Ground's Edgewood Area earlier this month had minimal effect on the environment. "In a report received [May 8] at APG's Environmental Division, test results from samples taken from King's Creek and Bush River May 2, indicated the wastewater overflow that occurred May 1, was diluted and mostly rainwater," the APG Garrison said in a news release Wednesday.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A sewage overflow estimated at 50,000 gallons was released into Miller Run in west Catonsville, and officials have advised people avoid contact with the waste water. Baltimore County's public works department responded to the sanitary sewer overflow Monday morning. A resident discovered the sewage, which overflowed from a manhole in a right-of-way south of Baltimore National Pike and north of Quilting Bee Road. The overflow was undetected for about seven days; after cleaning roots obstructing the line, the department stopped the overflow at 10 a.m., officials said.
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