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By Joni Guhne | February 13, 1992
The next time you're in Olde Severna Park, notice the latest addition to the Park skyline.That wonderful roofline soaring above the treetops near the B&A Trail belongs to Severna Park Elementary School.Under construction since the summer of 1990, the 52-year-old structure will be completely renovated by July 25, says Mike Raible, headof construction and planning for the county Board of Education.The expanded building will boast new air conditioning and carpeting and a new gym and cafeteria, the old one having been transformed into aspacious media center.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
Kai Jackson, a fourth-grader at Severna Park Elementary School, wants to call one of the new terrapins in his classroom Squirt. So he has to write a letter to his teacher in hopes of convincing her that that is the best name. "It's kind of cool," Kai said of the two additions to his classroom. "They're really fun to watch. We're going to take care of them, and we're going to help them have a better environment." The school is harnessing that enthusiasm for much of its curriculum as it takes part in the Terrapin Connection program.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Andrea F. Siegel and Kris Antonelli and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Angela Winter Ney contributed to this article | July 15, 1993
Patricia Emory, the former Severna Park Elementary School principal who was once charged as a drug kingpin, will return to the Anne Arundel County school system to work as the staff development coordinator, school officials said yesterday.The job entails coordinating training for all school system employees, from food service workers to principals. The school board approved her appointment, which will be effective Aug. 2, at yesterday's meeting.Mrs. Emory had been on leave with pay since her arrest Oct. 29.Mrs.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2002
ART INSTRUCTOR Suzanne Owens is hard to spot. Her paint-covered apron blends into the other colors in her Severna Park Elementary School classroom like the figures in a bold design by Matisse. She spends two days a week at Severna Park helping her pupils discover their artistic talents. The rest of the week, the educator - who has been teaching art so long she quit counting at year 25 - can be found in the county Board of Education art resource office. Here, she and her partner draw up plans to collect student artwork and install it in art exhibits at county malls, schools and libraries.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Patricia Emory, the former Severna Park Elementary School principal once charged as a drug kingpin, returned to work yesterday as the staff development coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools.Mrs. Emory, who will be working at the Carver Staff Development Center near Crofton, is spending her first few days back on the job working at the school system's headquarters on Riva Road in Annapolis.She met there briefly yesterday morning with Carol Parham, director of human resources, who is now acting superintendent, said Jane Doyle, a school spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Arthur Hirsch and Kris Antonelli and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writers Staff writers Peter Hermann, Deidre Nerreau McCabe, John Rivera and Andrea F. Siegel contributed to this article | October 30, 1992
A map in the Oct. 30 edition of The Sun showing 12 sites raided by Anne Arundel County police in a drug sweep contained one incorrect address. A home at 2904 Trainor Lane in Bowie was one of the locations raided.The Sun regrets the errors.The principal of Severna Park Elementary School and her husband were arrested and charged as drug kingpins in a pre-dawn sweep by Anne Arundel County police that netted $1 million worth of marijuana and 10 arrests.The raids of homes and rented storage bins broke a drug ring that operated from Baltimore to Prince George's County and had ties to Mexico and four states, officials said.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1997
INSTEAD OF the usual ecclesiastical sounds emanating from St. Martin's in the Field Episcopal Church on Benfield Road, you'll hear howdies and y'alls Saturday night.At 7 p.m., the church will begin its annual fund-raiser, the Wild West Gala Auction and Dance.With dancing, dining, entertainment and silent and live auctions, you should have a real foot-stompin' good time. For tickets, call 410-544-5770.Walk for EducationThe parent-teacher organizations from six Severna Park elementary schools will sponsor the Greater Severna Park Walk for Education from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. April 20.The walk is a cooperative effort by Benfield, Folger McKinsey, Jones, Oak Hill, Severna Park and Shipley's Choice elementary schools, the private Chesapeake Academy and the Greater Severna Park Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
July 20, 1993
Earlier this year, the Anne Arundel County Council offended the county's Jewish community by scheduling a hearing about a controversial anti-smoking bill on the first day of Passover.The U.S. Naval Academy obviously has made a similar mistake, scheduling homecoming -- its biggest alumni weekend -- on Yom Kippur.Yom Kippur is the holiest Jewish holiday of the year, marked by fasting and prayers of repentance. Clearly, the occasion precludes most Jewish alumni from attending cocktail parties, parades, dances and a football game.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
The third-graders from Severna Park Elementary School who visited Maryland National Bank yesterday came clutching their wordly goods -- boxes of quarters and bills in shabby wallets.In the final session of a six-week money class sponsored by the bank, the children came to learn what happens to their money after it leaves their hands.But they had other goals, too."I want to dive into the money!" exclaimed Scott Williams."I have an account, but I don't know where," yelled another child.At the drive-through window, the children marveled at the pneumatic tube.
NEWS
December 10, 1992
Patricia Emory, the Severna Park Elementary principal accused until Tuesday of being a drug kingpin, believes she has been victimized by the judicial system. In fact, the system did what it was designed to do: protect her from indictment on what prosecutors said was insufficient evidence.Naturally, Mrs. Emory does not see it that way. Her reputation has been tarnished in a way that could haunt her for the rest of her life. And though her lawyers broke out the champagne (a move that was not in good taste)
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1997
INSTEAD OF the usual ecclesiastical sounds emanating from St. Martin's in the Field Episcopal Church on Benfield Road, you'll hear howdies and y'alls Saturday night.At 7 p.m., the church will begin its annual fund-raiser, the Wild West Gala Auction and Dance.With dancing, dining, entertainment and silent and live auctions, you should have a real foot-stompin' good time. For tickets, call 410-544-5770.Walk for EducationThe parent-teacher organizations from six Severna Park elementary schools will sponsor the Greater Severna Park Walk for Education from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. April 20.The walk is a cooperative effort by Benfield, Folger McKinsey, Jones, Oak Hill, Severna Park and Shipley's Choice elementary schools, the private Chesapeake Academy and the Greater Severna Park Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
The former Severna Park Elementary School principal who was charged with being a marijuana kingpin, only to have the charges later dropped, is suing Anne Arundel County officials for $3 million, claiming false arrest, malicious prosecution and civil rights violations.Patricia A. Emory claims in the lawsuit, filed this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that county police barged into her home Oct. 29, 1992, under the authority of a search warrant obtained through "gross exaggerations, deliberate lies and inconsistencies."
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Patricia Emory, the former Severna Park Elementary School principal once charged as a drug kingpin, returned to work yesterday as the staff development coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools.Mrs. Emory, who will be working at the Carver Staff Development Center near Crofton, is spending her first few days back on the job working at the school system's headquarters on Riva Road in Annapolis.She met there briefly yesterday morning with Carol Parham, director of human resources, who is now acting superintendent, said Jane Doyle, a school spokeswoman.
NEWS
July 20, 1993
Earlier this year, the Anne Arundel County Council offended the county's Jewish community by scheduling a hearing about a controversial anti-smoking bill on the first day of Passover.The U.S. Naval Academy obviously has made a similar mistake, scheduling homecoming -- its biggest alumni weekend -- on Yom Kippur.Yom Kippur is the holiest Jewish holiday of the year, marked by fasting and prayers of repentance. Clearly, the occasion precludes most Jewish alumni from attending cocktail parties, parades, dances and a football game.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Andrea F. Siegel and Kris Antonelli and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Angela Winter Ney contributed to this article | July 15, 1993
Patricia Emory, the former Severna Park Elementary School principal who was once charged as a drug kingpin, will return to the Anne Arundel County school system to work as the staff development coordinator, school officials said yesterday.The job entails coordinating training for all school system employees, from food service workers to principals. The school board approved her appointment, which will be effective Aug. 2, at yesterday's meeting.Mrs. Emory had been on leave with pay since her arrest Oct. 29.Mrs.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
The third-graders from Severna Park Elementary School who visited Maryland National Bank yesterday came clutching their wordly goods -- boxes of quarters and bills in shabby wallets.In the final session of a six-week money class sponsored by the bank, the children came to learn what happens to their money after it leaves their hands.But they had other goals, too."I want to dive into the money!" exclaimed Scott Williams."I have an account, but I don't know where," yelled another child.At the drive-through window, the children marveled at the pneumatic tube.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer Staff writers Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Peter Hermann contributed to this article | December 9, 1992
Anne Arundel County's top prosecutor said yesterday he did not have enough evidence to seek the indictment of Patricia Emory, the elementary school principal accused of being a drug kingpin.But Frank Weathersbee, county state's attorney, said that does not mean he will close the 11-month investigation that led to the Oct. 29 arrest of 10 people, including Mrs. Emory and her husband, James. Police confiscated more than 400 pounds of marijuana and $320,000 in cash and other property in the all-night raid.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
The former Severna Park Elementary School principal who was charged with being a marijuana kingpin, only to have the charges later dropped, is suing Anne Arundel County officials for $3 million, claiming false arrest, malicious prosecution and civil rights violations.Patricia A. Emory claims in the lawsuit, filed this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that county police barged into her home Oct. 29, 1992, under the authority of a search warrant obtained through "gross exaggerations, deliberate lies and inconsistencies."
NEWS
December 10, 1992
Patricia Emory, the Severna Park Elementary principal accused until Tuesday of being a drug kingpin, believes she has been victimized by the judicial system. In fact, the system did what it was designed to do: protect her from indictment on what prosecutors said was insufficient evidence.Naturally, Mrs. Emory does not see it that way. Her reputation has been tarnished in a way that could haunt her for the rest of her life. And though her lawyers broke out the champagne (a move that was not in good taste)
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer Staff writers Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Peter Hermann contributed to this article | December 9, 1992
Anne Arundel County's top prosecutor said yesterday he did not have enough evidence to seek the indictment of Patricia Emory, the elementary school principal accused of being a drug kingpin.But Frank Weathersbee, county state's attorney, said that does not mean he will close the 11-month investigation that led to the Oct. 29 arrest of 10 people, including Mrs. Emory and her husband, James. Police confiscated more than 400 pounds of marijuana and $320,000 in cash and other property in the all-night raid.
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