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NEWS
February 3, 1991
A Maryland Army National Guard training exercise apparentl went awry last night as seven Special Forces paratroopers missed the drop site -- with one left in a tree and one hitting the water at the Lauderick Creek weekend training site, near the Edgewood Area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground, a spokesman said.Lt. Col. Howard O. Freedlander, the Guard spokesman, said that an evening parachute training exercise "encountered a problem. . . . All of our people are OK."The seven paratroopers jumped from a Chinook helicopter during a routine training mission, Colonel Freedlander said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and John W. Frece and Marina Sarris and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writers | September 15, 1995
Faced with federal cutbacks and the demand for smaller government, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday laid off seven members of his own staff, the first wave of cuts that could claim the jobs of up to 1,000 state workers a year in each of the next few years.Although many of the targeted jobs may be vacant, "you can't reduce 800 to 1,000 positions without having many layoffs of state workers," said Major F. Riddick Jr., the governor's chief of staff.Even as members of his State House staff were being given pink slips yesterday, the governor announced that he has hired an $82,712-a-year communications director to improve his image with the public.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | June 20, 1992
READING, Pa. -- The Reading Phillies scored seven runs in the opening inning and went on to defeat the Hagerstown Suns, 7-5, in a Double-A Eastern League game last night.The first seven batters for the Phillies (31-33) reached safely in the first. Overall, they sent 12 batters to the plate in the first inning, getting the seven runs on nine hits. The nine hits represented the most allowed in an inning by Hagerstown.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | February 4, 1992
The debut of Pick-Seven wagering, which was scheduled to start at Laurel Race Course on Thursday, has been delayed until Pimlico Race Course opens March 26.Until then, Laurel will continue to offer the Double Triple each day on the third and fifth races.Because a new phase of the Laurel meet technically begins Thursday, there will be a special distribution of the Double Triple at Laurel today. The carry-over totals $71,571. But if no one hits the Double Triple on today's card, the pool will be carried over to Thursday.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
CARLISLE, Iowa -- This is what you say one day after your wife has given birth to seven healthy babies: "Wow."Looking like a man who may never stop smiling, Kenny McCaughey stood at the altar in his small-town church and described the joy of fathering septuplets -- the four boys and three girls who were born Wednesday in a Des Moines hospital."
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2000
Ryan Kohlmeier blushes when he says he never saw any of this coming, certainly not this quickly. Not a jump into a Camden Yards summer and definitely not seven saves in as many opportunities. The best the 23-year-old can do is offer a tight-lipped smile when he thinks about the series of events that has promoted him from an almost undetected Kansas schoolboy to a secondary pitching prospect to the centerpiece for the Orioles' in-season makeover. One of three children, one of fewer than 1,000 residents of Cottonwood Fall, Kan., and now the best-known of a 30-member high school class, Kohlmeier has not only used the past month to step from Triple-A Rochester to the Orioles' bullpen, but to offer himself as the team's future closer.
NEWS
November 21, 1997
IN "The Sound of Music," nun-in-training Maria incredulously exclaims, "Seven children!" when she learns the number of charges she will look after as governess. This week, thousands of Americans echoed those words in amazement after the birth of septuplets in Carlisle, Iowa.Parents who have struggled through arduous weeks with one newborn could only imagine multiplying by seven the sleepless nights, feedings, diaper changes, crying and cost of baby clothes, supplies and college 18 years hence.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 6, 1997
The Charleston Alley Cats scored seven runs in the bottom of the eighth inning to come from behind and beat the Delmarva Shorebirds, 9-3, in a Single-A South Atlantic League game in West Virginia last night.Trailing 3-2, the Alley Cats sent 11 batters to the plate in the eighth. Dave Guthrie had two singles in the inning, including a bases-loaded hit that scored three runs.Delmarva starter Brian Falkenborg allowed two runs and four hits through seven innings but failed to retire the first two batters in the eighth and took the loss.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Just about every time the Tampa Bay Rays have been mentioned to Buck Showalter in the past month, he can't help but talk about Drew Smyly, the left-handed starter the Rays received from the Detroit Tigers in last month's blockbuster deal that included All-Star left-hander David Price. Showalter has gushed about Smyly for parts of three seasons. The Orioles had inquired about his availability periodically during that span, but they never could land him. Based on his performance in the Rays' 3-1 victory Wednesday at Camden Yards, the Orioles can't be happy about facing Smyly a whole lot over the next four-plus seasons.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Training camp has taken a toll on Towson's stable of tailbacks. All seven running backs were held out of Wednesday's practice at Johnny Unitas Stadium because of a variety of injuries. Perhaps the most distressing scene involved sophomore Darius Victor -- the Colonial Athletic Association's Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2013 and the anticipated starter this fall -- applying ice to his left foot and then wearing a walking boot on the same foot. But coach Rob Ambrose called the ailment plaguing Victor minor, saying, “He's not going today.
SPORTS
From Inside Lacrosse | July 17, 2014
1. Matt Abbott is the U.S. team's most important player One of the strongest reactions to the U.S. team's 23-man roster was the lack of a third short-stick defensive midfielder, and that criticism was exacerbated by  injuries to Dan Burns and Kyle Harrison in pool play . What it also shone a bright spotlight on is how consistent and reliable Matt Abbott is as a player. So many times, he's come in off the wings of a faceoff to make a tough ground ball look easy or pulled out of a so-so transition opportunity to calmly flip the ball to an on-subbing midfielder.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
During his rookie season last year, one of the toughest adjustments for Ravens outside linebacker John Simon was learning the nuances of pass coverage. At Ohio State, the gritty former Big Ten Conference Player of the Year lined up at defensive end, defensive tackle and linebacker while operating primarily as a pass rusher and run-stopper. Simon rarely was asked to drop back in pass coverage in college. So, playing in reverse has become a major point of emphasis for Simon following a quiet rookie year in which the fourth-round draft pick played on special teams.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Seven people were taken to hospitals after a pickup truck ran into an assisted living facility in Reisterstown Friday evening, Baltimore County fire department officials said. The truck ran into the building, in the 600 block of Main St., around 6:30 p.m. and struck a gas line. No fire or explosion was caused by the ruptured line. Five of the eight residents of the assisted living facility were taken to the hospital, two with injuries that were serious but not life-threatening.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
As Lievinne Mongu listened to the speakers at her naturalization ceremony, she reflected on her 14-year journey - from fear in the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo to asylum in the United States, a home in Silver Spring and a job with the International Monetary Fund in Washington. She beamed throughout Friday's ceremony at the William Paca House & Garden in Annapolis. And after standing up, raising her right hand and reciting the oath of citizenship, she said she wished that others around the world could feel what she was feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2003
Carlin's not a one-dimensional guy, so in honor of his landmark 1978 Supreme Court case -- in which justices ruled, 5-4, that the Federal Communications Commission could ban seven words from television and radio during hours when children might hear them -- here are seven Carlin observations that have nothing to do with war: Civilization began its downhill path the day some guy first uttered the words, "A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do." Guys don't seem to be called Lefty anymore.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 11, 1992
Surely one of the most ambitious, provocative and strangely poignant projects in all of documentary filmmaking is the "7 Up" series, begun in 1964 by Britain's Grenada TV and continued every seven years since then. The new installment, "35 Up," opens today at the Charles, and it is by far the most compelling.For those unfamiliar with the concept, the "Up" series is an examination of class, heredity and destiny, played out in real time. It began in 1964, when the British commercial network Grenada did a soporific profile on 14 "typical" British TC schoolchildren, then all 7 years old. The kids were drawn from all classes, meant to provide a "cross-section" of the future of society, as the narrator grandly put it.Somewhere along the line, somebody got the bright idea of revisiting the children every seven years to gauge their progress: "35 Up" is the fifth such enterprise, using footage from the four previous visits.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
As the temperature rises every summer in Baltimore, so does the number of balls that carry out of Camden Yards. Hits similar to ones that landed at the warning track two weeks ago are now finding their way into the seats. And the Orioles lineup is built to take full advantage of such a summer swoon. The Orioles led the major leagues with 46 home runs in June, and they continued their power surge into July. They hit three homers, including Nelson Cruz's 26th of the season on his 34th birthday, in an 8-3 victory over the struggling Texas Rangers on Tuesday night in front of an announced 19,150.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Netdao Yutakon of Nashville, Tenn., was still shaking her head, getting used to the lightness two days after her waist-length hair was chopped off to meet Naval Academy regulations in time for her freshman year. "It was like losing a best friend," said Yutakon, an 18-year-old graduate of Hume-Fogg Academic High School in Tennessee, as she fiddled with the locks that now come just below her ears. At least Yutakon was spared the razor. One by one, members of the freshmen class who didn't have their hair cut before Tuesday saw their locks vanish with the quick work of a barber - a ritual that was among their first tastes of academy life in Annapolis.
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