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By Elizabeth Pond | March 27, 1997
THE UNSUNG SUCCESS of the Helsinki summit was the quiet boost it gave to Ukrainian as well as Polish security. The peace of new Central European members of NATO, the summit made clear, will not be bought at the price of greater insecurity for neighboring non-members farther east.This is the not-so-hidden message of the peaceboat diplomacy that followed the summit this week as ships from the U.S. and six other NATO countries visited the Ukrainian Black Sea port of Odessa.Joint NATO-Ukrainian naval maneuvers next August not far from Sevastopol, the Ukrainian city and naval base that the Russian parliament claims belongs to Russia, will repeat the message.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | June 4, 1997
NATO ENLARGEMENT is succeeding faster than its designers dared hope. A week after resigning itself to NATO expansion and 5 1/2 long years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russia has finally acknowledged that Ukraine is an independent country.Westerners regard the continued existence of Ukraine -- which with temporary exceptions was ruled from Moscow for the three centuries before 1991 -- as the best single guarantee against any return of Russian imperialism. The latest Russian accommodation to post-Cold War realities is just the sort of stabilization of new and wannabe democracies that NATO has hoped to promote in central and eastern Europe.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 3, 1993
MOSCOW -- Officials in the Ukrainian city of Sevastopol decided to allow the asbestos-laden SS United States into port yesterday.The navy yard there will refurbish the sleek but decrepit ship in a job that will bring millions of badly needed dollars into the economy but that has sparked protests over its environmental hazards.The 41-year-old ocean liner, once the flagship of the U.S. trans-Atlantic fleet, had been kept out of port for several days while officials debated what to do.Owned now by Turkish and U.S. interests, the United States had been at a mooring in Turkey for more than a year, but no yard there would take on the work.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | March 27, 1997
THE UNSUNG SUCCESS of the Helsinki summit was the quiet boost it gave to Ukrainian as well as Polish security. The peace of new Central European members of NATO, the summit made clear, will not be bought at the price of greater insecurity for neighboring non-members farther east.This is the not-so-hidden message of the peaceboat diplomacy that followed the summit this week as ships from the U.S. and six other NATO countries visited the Ukrainian Black Sea port of Odessa.Joint NATO-Ukrainian naval maneuvers next August not far from Sevastopol, the Ukrainian city and naval base that the Russian parliament claims belongs to Russia, will repeat the message.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | June 4, 1997
NATO ENLARGEMENT is succeeding faster than its designers dared hope. A week after resigning itself to NATO expansion and 5 1/2 long years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russia has finally acknowledged that Ukraine is an independent country.Westerners regard the continued existence of Ukraine -- which with temporary exceptions was ruled from Moscow for the three centuries before 1991 -- as the best single guarantee against any return of Russian imperialism. The latest Russian accommodation to post-Cold War realities is just the sort of stabilization of new and wannabe democracies that NATO has hoped to promote in central and eastern Europe.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | January 29, 1997
KIEV, Ukraine -- So far, so good, if Ukraine is the measure of NATO enlargement.One of the strongest arguments against admitting new members to NATO has been that such enlargement would draw new dividing lines in Europe. It might increase stability for Poland and other Central European states allowed into the privileged club, opponents argued, but it would increase instability for those on the other side of the line, most notably the Baltic states and Ukraine. Russia could be expected to retaliate by pressuring its vulnerable neighbors, and that would be a grave loss overall.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 2, 1993
MOSCOW -- The SS United States, once the pride of America's civilian fleet, was anchored off the Black Sea port of Sevastopol yesterday, hoping for reincarnation but treated like a pariah.The vessel that once beat all records across the Atlantic needs total repair and is laden with asbestos, and no one seems to want the job.The vessel, which has been out of service since 1969, has already been turned down by shipyards in Ilichevsk and Odessa, and yesterday officials in Sevastopol were trying to decide what to do with it. Greenpeace, the environmental group, has been hounding it wherever it goes.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 29, 2001
MOSCOW - As Afghanistan's political factions meet in Germany to try to reach agreement on how best to piece together their shattered country, hundreds of merchants in a dingy hotel complex here are praying that the talks succeed. Over the past two decades, Afghanistan has been stripped of most of its professionals, civil servants and technical experts, people crucial for running a modern state. Many are here, wondering if they should return. Educated Afghans living in the West "are well off, they have legal status, and their children go to school - you can't expect them to return," says Gullam Muhammed, the unofficial leader of Moscow's Afghan community.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
MOSCOW -- After years of doubt and tensions, the presidents of Russia and Ukraine signed a friendship treaty yesterday designed to strengthen the weak bonds between the two states.The treaty was signed in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, on Boris N. Yeltsin's first trip there as president of Russia. Many previous visits were scheduled or considered, but all were postponed because of tensions over the future of the Black Sea Fleet, territorial disputes in the ethnic Russian region of Crimea, which is part of Ukraine, and other issues.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 30, 2001
MOSCOW - A worn-out old survey ship, pressed into service to carry small-time traders back and forth across the Black Sea, foundered with its load of overcoats and leather goods Friday night and left its survivors to drift two days before their rescue. It was a vessel whose passengers, so-called "shuttle traders" who pick up goods at Turkish markets for resale in Ukraine and Russia, made a habit of living and working in the shadows. And when it faltered and sank, nearly 48 hours were to pass before anyone ashore began to wonder what might have happened to it. At least 14 people are dead and five more are missing.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | January 29, 1997
KIEV, Ukraine -- So far, so good, if Ukraine is the measure of NATO enlargement.One of the strongest arguments against admitting new members to NATO has been that such enlargement would draw new dividing lines in Europe. It might increase stability for Poland and other Central European states allowed into the privileged club, opponents argued, but it would increase instability for those on the other side of the line, most notably the Baltic states and Ukraine. Russia could be expected to retaliate by pressuring its vulnerable neighbors, and that would be a grave loss overall.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 3, 1993
MOSCOW -- Officials in the Ukrainian city of Sevastopol decided to allow the asbestos-laden SS United States into port yesterday.The navy yard there will refurbish the sleek but decrepit ship in a job that will bring millions of badly needed dollars into the economy but that has sparked protests over its environmental hazards.The 41-year-old ocean liner, once the flagship of the U.S. trans-Atlantic fleet, had been kept out of port for several days while officials debated what to do.Owned now by Turkish and U.S. interests, the United States had been at a mooring in Turkey for more than a year, but no yard there would take on the work.
NEWS
By James Ron and Alexander Cooley | July 9, 2000
RUSSIA HAS worked out leasing agreements with some of the former Soviet states that enables it to keep its military assets on their territory. Why couldn't it be possible between Israel and the Palestinians? The way it would work: Israel would recognize Palestinian sovereignty over all of what were the Israeli-occupied territories in the West Bank and Gaza. Then, Palestine would rent back specific areas to the Israeli military. This leasing arrangement should be extended to the hard-line Jewish settlements blocking a peace deal.
NEWS
September 27, 1995
FOR A GLIMPSE of Congress at work, take a quick hard look at the $243 billion defense appropriations bill just approved by Senate and House conferees. The measure, richly deserving a presidential veto, contains two big-ticket items that cause fiscal indigestion not only among Democratic liberals but among Republican deficit hawks intent on balancing the budget.Before conferees assembled a few weeks ago, the Senate had gone on record against added funds for the B-2 bomber and the House had voted to reject a third Seawolf nuclear submarine.
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