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NEWS
October 29, 2002
IN AMERICA, Israel's running battle with suicide bombers and the resulting death toll usually dominate the news from the Jewish state. Who could not be transfixed by photos of the charred skeleton of a commuter bus or the bravery of young soldiers who sacrifice themselves to stop a terrorist? But these events, as horrific as they may be, can deflect attention from other events that undermine prospects for peace in the Mideast. For two days last week, Israeli soldiers and police suffered indignation and humiliation at the hands of Jewish settlers as they tried to remove about 20 illegal outposts on West Bank hilltops.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | October 3, 2011
The second week of Fox's "Terra Nova" took a page from Alfred Hitchcock's book, with our band of time-travelling settlers under attack from swarms of reptilian-like birds of prey in a refreshing, quick-paced hour Monday night. An hour seems a more manageable chunk of time for this adventure - the two-hour premiere was a bit much for one go, and this week's episode was decidedly more enjoyable than the last. Maybe it was the passing mention that Terra Nova, like any self-respecting settlement of pioneers, has a bar. This time, the establishment of Terra Nova is under siege from massive flocks of miniature pterodactyls - a species previously unknown in the region and time in which the Shannon family finds themselves.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
A century ago, the Page family settled in Catonsville, founded a church and operated the neighborhood grocery out of the front rooms of a home on Winters Lane. Still, the family's 99-year-old matriarch, Eva Page Brooks - whose living room was once that family store - could not trace its history back more than a few generations. But thanks to the Internet and a DNA sample, the Catonsville clan has become the first black family - and the first Baltimoreans - to verify their descent from two 17th- and 18th-century settlers of Virginia and become members of a group dedicated to their legacy, the Page-Nelson Society.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
A century ago, the Page family settled in Catonsville, founded a church and operated the neighborhood grocery out of the front rooms of a home on Winters Lane. Still, the family's 99-year-old matriarch, Eva Page Brooks - whose living room was once that family store - could not trace its history back more than a few generations. But thanks to the Internet and a DNA sample, the Catonsville clan has become the first black family - and the first Baltimoreans - to verify their descent from two 17th- and 18th-century settlers of Virginia and become members of a group dedicated to their legacy, the Page-Nelson Society.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | May 16, 1994
JERICHO, West Bank -- Vowing to ignore the "terrorist" Palestinian policemen, a group of right-wing Jews armed with submachine guns traveled to an ancient Jericho synagogue site to pray yesterday.They were allowed to pass by the new Palestinian police, who took over control of Jericho on Friday. After a few hours, the Jews left at the request of the Israeli military, but they said they would return next week.The incident ended peacefully, but it was an indication of the problems that lay ahead in executing an agreement that promises Palestinians control but permits armed Israelis to ignore that control.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2006
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army announced last night that it was sealing off Jewish settlements in the West Bank town of Hebron, where hundreds of settlers and their supporters have rioted for the past several days to protest a government order to vacate an illegal Jewish enclave. The move represents a sharp escalation of the army's confrontation with the protesters and places acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert on a collision course with militant settlers. Until now, their fury had been aimed primarily at Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who remained in grave condition after a massive cerebral hemorrhage Jan. 4. In recent days, masked settler youths have confronted Israeli troops in Hebron's old town, throwing stones and paint bombs, scuffling, cursing and setting fires.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 15, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli Cabinet ministers yesterday approved payment of advances to Jewish settlers willing to leave their homes in the Gaza Strip and in four West Bank settlements, setting in motion the first practical steps in Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's withdrawal plan. Sharon's Security Cabinet approved outlines of a compensation package that includes incentives for settlers willing to leave voluntarily and advances for settlers ready to move now, officials said. Settlers could receive about $200,000 to $350,000 per family, depending on the size of their home, how long they had lived in their settlement and where they agreed to move, according to the outline.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 1999
MA'ON FARM, West Bank -- Splitting with the old guard of established Jewish settlements, a young generation of settlers is throwing a wrench into Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak's plans to bring an orderly end to the era of uncontrolled, unapproved hilltop encampments in the West Bank.Yesterday, a group called Dor Hahemshech, meaning the Next or Continuing Generation, blocked the path of a truck sent to remove a large metal container that settlers had placed to stake a claim to a piece of ground called Hill 804 east of Hebron.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 26, 2008
YITZHAR, West Bank - A pipe bomb that exploded late last night outside the Jerusalem home of Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University professor, left him slightly wounded and created only a minor stir in a nation that routinely experiences violence on a much larger scale. But Sternhell was noted for his impassioned criticism of Jewish settlements in the West Bank, once suggesting that Palestinians "would be wise to concentrate their struggle against the settlements." And the authorities found fliers near his home offering nearly $300,000 to anyone who kills a member of Peace Now, a left-wing Israeli advocacy group, leading them to suspect that militant Israeli settlers or their supporters were behind the attack.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
RAMAT MAMARE, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- When Secretary of State James A. Baker III returns to Israel today, he can be confident that no formula he might propose for a regional peace conference would satisfy Jewish settlers here."
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
When white settlers arrived in what is now Virginia, bringing with them their strange and sometimes warlike ways, the Powhatan peoples of the region had some decisions to make. The settlers had fired on Powhatans almost the moment they landed in 1607. Their leaders inadvertently insulted Chief Powhatan by asking him to kneel to accept a ceremonial crown. John Smith, president of the Jamestown colony, sent soldiers to drive many Powhatans from their homes. "The clan mothers got together, talked and prayed: How will we handle this problem with the white settlers?"
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 26, 2008
YITZHAR, West Bank - A pipe bomb that exploded late last night outside the Jerusalem home of Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University professor, left him slightly wounded and created only a minor stir in a nation that routinely experiences violence on a much larger scale. But Sternhell was noted for his impassioned criticism of Jewish settlements in the West Bank, once suggesting that Palestinians "would be wise to concentrate their struggle against the settlements." And the authorities found fliers near his home offering nearly $300,000 to anyone who kills a member of Peace Now, a left-wing Israeli advocacy group, leading them to suspect that militant Israeli settlers or their supporters were behind the attack.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israeli police with sledgehammers and chain saws broke into a fortified building in the West Bank city of Hebron yesterday and dragged out more than 200 spitting, stone-throwing Jewish settlers who had defied a court order to leave. The showdown in the center of the city sparked debate in Israel over the source of authority for its army. Seven army officers and soldiers were disciplined Monday for refusing, on religious grounds and with rabbinical blessing, to serve as backup for the police operation.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel has approved construction of new housing for Jewish settlers in the West Bank, officials said yesterday, drawing protests from Palestinian leaders and Israeli peace activists who said the decision violates a three-year-old pledge to the United States to freeze settlement activity. Israeli officials insisted that there was no such breach, saying the site of the new homes for 100 families in the northern Jordan valley had been a Jewish settlement since 1981. But Palestinian leaders said the announcement, coming just three days after Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas launched an effort to revive peace talks, undermined the cooperative spirit of the weekend meeting.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 10, 2006
The Weight of Smoke: A Novel of the Jamestown Colony George Robert Minkoff McPherson & Company / 392 pages / $24.95 One of the most compelling stories of early Colonial American history is that of the establishment of the Jamestown Colony. On May 14, 1607, the Virginia Company explorers, funded by a charter by King James I of England, landed on Jamestown Island. They were there to establish an English colony on the banks of the James River, in what is now Virginia, and settle the New World - and mine its untold riches - for England.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
White sails unfurled, a wooden replica of a 17th-century ship glided past rusted factories, soot-stained smokestacks and rotting piers in the Inner Harbor yesterday - an emissary of distant times drifting by the ruins of the recent past. The Godspeed, a re-creation of one of the ships that brought the first settlers to Jamestown, Va., in 1607, sailed over the placid, earth-colored waters of the Inner Harbor yesterday and docked near the Baltimore Visitor Center. The ship is stopping here as part of a six-port tour celebrating the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, the first permanent English outpost in the Americas.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Joshua Brilliant contributed to this story | December 26, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Shlomo Katan, a right-wing mayor of a Jewish settlement in the West Bank, drove a quarter-mile this week to visit the neighboring Arab city of Qalqilya for the first time in six years.He met Qalqilya's mayor. They hugged. They swapped phone numbers. "It was lovely," said Mr. Katan.Such gestures -- small as they may seem -- are coming from the Israeli right wing more frequently. A growing number of Jewish settlers are saying they must acknowledge Palestinian authority in the West Bank, which they had fought so ardently against.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 16, 2005
KFAR DAROM, Gaza Strip - Israeli soldiers delivered eviction notices yesterday to thousands of Jewish settlers in the Gaza Strip, warning that they would be forcibly removed starting tomorrow, as Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said the evacuation he ordered "was vital for Israel" but "the most difficult and painful step of all." Soldiers and police found their way blocked at most settlements and either negotiated with settlement leaders for a small number of officers to enter by the end of the day or, as was the case in Kfar Darom, remained outside the settlement gates.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | May 22, 2006
MA'ALE MICHMAS, West Bank -- Otniel Schneller, who helped establish this hilltop settlement 25 years ago, knows he won his seat in Israel's parliament without much support from his neighbors. His political ideas are nothing short of toxic here, since he supports dismantling dozens of isolated settlements in the West Bank, including, most likely, his own. But Schneller believes that his transformation from an ardent supporter of settlements to an architect for the new government's plan to abandon them is evidence that even the most committed settlers can change their views about what is best for Israel's future.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli police sawed through a steel door yesterday to evict dozens of Jewish settlers from a house in the West Bank town of Hebron in the first such confrontation since Israel's new government took office. Police were pelted with rocks and paint-filled bottles as they moved to evacuate three families that had occupied the building with more than two dozen settler youths who barricaded themselves inside as a show of support. Last week, Israel's Supreme Court ordered the families out after police determined that documents purporting to show that the house had been legally purchased from its Palestinian owner were fraudulent.
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