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BUSINESS
December 15, 2011
In a settlement with Gov. Martin O'Malley over the proposed buyout of Constellation Energy Group, Exelon Corp. has promised to develop significantly more natural gas, wind and solar power in Maryland, give more money to help low-income customers and provide more protections for Baltimore Gas and Electric. Provisions of the settlement include: •Up to 300 megawatts in new power generation in Maryland within 10 years. That includes: —10 megawatts to 25 megawatts from poultry manure plant, the first in the state.
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
It wasn't long after Ashley Overbey won approval for a $63,000 settlement from Baltimore's government that anonymous critics began their assault against her on the Internet. Commenting on news accounts of the settlement - which ended her lawsuit alleging police brutality - they accused the 27-year-old of initiating her arrest to get a big payout. She responded, defending herself and recounting details of the incident - a move that led the city to withhold $31,500 from Overbey's payout this week.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is not happy that the Federal Reserve Board and the Office of the Comptroller of Currency settled with 10 mortgage servicers this week, putting an end to the Independent Foreclosure Review that the government required the firms to organize. “I am deeply disappointed that the OCC and the Federal Reserve finalized this settlement and effectively terminated the Independent Foreclosure Review process before providing Congress answers to serious questions about how this settlement amount was determined, who these funds will go to, and what will happen to other families who were abused by these mortgage servicing companies, but have not yet had their cases reviewed,” said Cummings, ranking member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, in a statement following the settlement announcement Monday.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Even before they signed it, a handful of Major League Baseball owners expressed deep misgivings about a 2005 agreement negotiated by Orioles owner Peter Angelos establishing conditions under which the Montreal Expos would move and become the Washington Nationals. The owners, all members of baseball's executive council, sounded like customers having second thoughts after buying something from an aggressive salesman. They questioned whether Major League Baseball ceded too much to the Orioles for their agreement to share the club's exclusive television territory, according to the minutes of a March 28, 2005, conference call released last week as an exhibit in a court case.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
A South Dakota-based payday lender and its California partner are to pay about $2 million under the terms of a settlement designed to address "abusive" lending and collection activities, the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Monday. Regulators first placed a cease-and-desist order on Western Sky Financial, owner Martin Webb and related entities in 2011, after complaints from consumers about interest rates of up to 1,825 percent, well above the state cap, which ranges from 24 percent to 33 percent based on the size of the loan.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 7, 2013
Joomsef.net, a website that posted exaggerated traffic citations, has reached a settlement with Maryland's Consumer Protection Division, the state attorney general announced this morning. The state claims that Joomsef, run by Stanislav Komsky, published public information on traffic offenses, but indicated that the drivers had been "booked" or arrested. It would also state that mugshots weren't available, wrongly implying that a mugshot had been taken, the state said. Consumers found out by searching for themselves on the Internet.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
Anti-abortion advocates will gather at 10 a.m. Monday outside the Maryland State Police Headquarters in Pikesville to publicly discuss a $385,000 settlement involving both parties. The activists and their attorneys will discuss details of the case, which they say include a requirement that all state troopers receive additional training. The activists' federal lawsuit was over the August 2008 arrests of 18 protesters with Baltimore-based Defend Life during a Bel Air rally.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
The Anne Arundel County government is getting more than $300,000 as part of a settlement of a class-action lawsuit over prescription drug pricing. Anne Arundel's portion of the $82 million settlement is $365,886.26 and will go into the county's health insurance fund, which handles all of the health insurance benefits for county employees and retirees, county officials said. The federal class-action lawsuit alleged that a drug wholesaler and a company that publishes drug data conspired to drive up the wholesale price of certain drugs, according to the county.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | March 14, 2012
Maryland financial regulators will take part in the effort to make sure the big banks that recently settled allegations of widespread foreclosure misconduct live up to the agreement they signed. Anne Balcer Norton, deputy commissioner of financial regulation at the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, said the agency has been named to the monitoring committee for the nationwide settlement. It's the only state bank regulator on the committee, she said. "I'm pleased that we get a seat at the table," she said, adding that the agency has the "ground-level perspective" of what homeowners are going through.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Maryland will get nearly $10,000 as part of a national settlement involving kickbacks to doctors to encourage them to implant pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Thursday. Medtronic Inc, the developer of the medical devices, settled with the federal government for $23.5 million. Medtronic paid physicians who agreed to participate in clinical studies or registries involving their pacemakers and ICDs, according to the agreement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Custom sports uniform provider Sports55 Inc. has reached a settlement with the state over allegations that it failed to fulfill youth team uniform orders or delivered them late, the Maryland Attorney General's office said. The state Consumer Protection Division reached the settlement with Sports55 and affiliated enterprises Teamuniforms123 LLC and Dyesubsports LLC, all based in Anne Arundel County, and two owners, Kelly Burke and John Eberl, the Attorney General's office said. "Dozens of adult and youth league teams were left in the lurch when this company failed to promptly deliver the uniforms they ordered and paid for," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A Middle River man who accused a Baltimore police officer of assault and battery will receive nearly $50,000 in a settlement approved Wednesday by the city's spending panel. Charles Faulkner accused Officer Daniel Hersl of battering his face with a police radio and his fists during an arrest Sept. 1, 2010, in the 1900 block of Wolfe St., according to court records and a settlement memo. The Board of Estimates approved the settlement without discussion, although City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young voted to reject the agreement.
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The owners of two popular restaurants in downtown Baltimore have agreed to pay $1.3 million and establish new hiring measures to settle a years-old lawsuit alleging racial discrimination against black applicants and employees. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the lawsuit in 2008 against McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurants Inc. and Schmick Restaurant Corp., owners of McCormick & Schmick's and M&S Grill in the Inner Harbor. The lawsuit claimed the restaurants violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by refusing to hire black applicants for front-of-the-house positions such as servers and hostesses.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
More than two dozen of Dr. Nikita Levy's former patients have filed an objection to a $190 million class-action settlement over the Johns Hopkins gynecologist's malpractice. The plaintiffs cited an "excessive legal fee" requested by the lawyers who negotiated the settlement and a lack of clarity regarding the amount each patient would receive, according to the objection. The settlement - one of the largest ever of its kind - was announced in July, five months after investigators found more than 1,300 videos and images, surreptitiously recorded during pelvic exams, in Levy's home and office.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel is asked to approve a $40,000 settlement on charges that city officers falsely arrested a man and committed assault and battery against him at his Glen Oaks apartment. Alex Dickson, the plaintiff in the case, received significant injuries to his teeth, nose and ribs after three officers came to his apartment on Aug. 13, 2010 with his girlfriend under the terms of a protective order so she could retrieve some personal items. When the group arrived, Dickson used his body to block Officer James Wilder from crossing the threshold when Wilder grabbed Dickson and placed him under arrest, according to the settlement memo presented to the Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday is slated to approve a $65,000 settlement to a woman who suffered "significant" injuries after tripping and falling on uneven and broken pavement in downtown Baltimore. Nickia Tunnell filed suit against the mayor and City Council in 2013 after she was walking on or near E. Baltimore Street at Custom House Ave. in the downtown area. She attempted to cross the street, but tripped and fell due to uneven and broken pavement, according to settlement documents submitted to the city's spending panel.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
The online messaging service Snapchat will pay Maryland $100,000 to settle allegations that the company falsely claimed that images sent over its system would be deleted permanently after they were viewed. The company denied the allegations. According to a statement on Snapchat's blog, the agreement "concluded with Snapchat admitting no violation of any federal, state or local law. " The settlement also says the company must take steps to stop users under 13 from using the service, through which Snapchat says users can privately message photos and videos that expire after a time limit set by the sender.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
State regulators proposed on Wednesday that Verizon's ability to raise rates on some basic telephone services be directly tied to the telecommunications giant's efforts to improve customer service – a potential outcome that would be a regulatory first in Maryland. The proposed order from the Maryland Public Service Commission comes amidst several ongoing cases dealing with complaints from tens of thousands of customers who experienced lengthy delays in customer service in 2007 and 2008.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Their loss Wednesday in a federal appeals court left Baltimore's police and fire unions with a few options to continue the fight over Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's 2010 pension reform law, but none of them look promising. Rather than subject themselves and the taxpayers to potentially years more litigation in federal and state court, the unions should recognize that the bulk of the 2010 law is going to stand and seek a settlement with the city on the one portion of the reforms on which they have met some success.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's overhaul of Baltimore's police and fire pension system, but left open avenues for the unions to keep fighting. "I'm certainly pleased with the court's ruling," Rawlings-Blake said of the decision. City officials say it cut about $400 million in pension costs by reducing benefits, raising the retirement age and requiring higher contributions from workers. "It was not something any of us wanted to do," the mayor said.
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