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January 18, 2007
Sister Joan Marie Waters, a member of the Roman Catholic order Daughters of Charity who had been a librarian at the old Seton High School, died Jan. 11 at her order's retirement residence in Emmitsburg. She was 101. Dorothy Marie Waters was born and raised in Davenport, Iowa, and moved Baltimore with her family when she was 21. She entered the Daughters of Charity in 1929 and was given the name Sister Joan Marie. She earned a bachelor's degree in English at the old St. Joseph College in Emmitsburg, where she later taught history.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Mary L. Booker, who rose through the ranks from classroom teacher to principal while mentoring her peers, died Jan. 9 of multiple myeloma at her Hamilton home. She was 57. "Mary L. Booker was a consummate educator and administrator. She was my principal mentor when I was a new principal and generously shared her decades of experience and insight with me," said interim city schools CEO Tisha Edwards. "She devoted her life to the children of Baltimore," Ms. Edwards said. "Her career embodied the highest standards of professionalism with deep personal dedication to her students and colleagues.
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NEWS
January 19, 1996
Sister Augustine, 91, Seton High School teacherSister Augustine Troy, a member of the Daughters of Charity who taught history and home economics for 28 years at Seton High School in Baltimore, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Villa St. Michael in Emmitsburg. She was 91.The former Mary Pleasants of Long Green graduated from Seton High and entered the Daughters of Charity in 1923. She earned a bachelor of science degree in social studies from St. Joseph College in Emmitsburg and a master's in education in guidance and psychology from Loyola College in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 31, 2011
Constance L. "Connie" Cucina, a longtime volunteer at Stella Maris Hospice where she had been a familiar figure in the gift shop helping patients and their families for more than 20 years, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Towson home. She was 78. The daughter of a wholesale produce broker and a homemaker, Constance Lee Demarco was born in Baltimore and raised on Cold Spring Lane and Springhill Avenue. She was a 1951 graduate of Seton High School. Four years later, she married Samuel D. Cucina, who was also in wholesale produce.
NEWS
November 24, 2002
Sister Aubrey Query, a member of the Daughters of Charity and a former Seton High School coordinator, died Monday of liver disease at Villa St. Michael, her order's Emmitsburg retirement residence. She was 97. Born Aubrey Marie Query in Portsmouth, Va., she earned a degree from the old St. Joseph's College in Emmitsburg. She entered the Daughters of Charity in 1927 and took her vows in 1932. She formerly had the religious name Sister Mary Stanislaus. Sister Aubrey had teaching assignments in Troy, N.Y., and Richmond, Va., among other cities, before coming to Baltimore in 1962 as an elementary teacher at St. Martin School in West Baltimore.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
Sister Helen Jones, a parochial school educator for 45 years, died of a heart attack Sept. 5 at Villa St. Michael in Emmitsburg. She was 87.She began her career in 1934. After teaching biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and English at parochial schools in Virginia and New York, Sister Helen was assigned to Seton High School in Baltimore in 1970. She also taught at Elizabeth Ann Seton High School in Bladensburg from 1976 to 1979, when she became a docent at the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg.
NEWS
May 5, 2007
Sister Mary Margaret Nagle, a member of the Daughters of Charity and dietitian, died of old age complications April 26 at her order's retirement home in Emmitsburg. She was 94. Born in Kilconnell in County Clare, Ireland, she came to the United States in 1929 and entered the religious order in 1936. She became a convent, school and orphanage dietitian, and was the dietary director for the nuns at the old Seton High School in Charles Village from 1967 to 1988. After an assignment as a patient visitor at the old Jenkins Memorial Home on Caton Avenue in Southwest Baltimore, she moved to the retirement home, St. Joseph's Provincial House.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
Sister Margaret Dougherty, who was president of St. Joseph College in Emmitsburg from 1968 until it was closed in 1973, died Sunday of cancer at the Daughters of Charity provincial house in Emmitsburg. She was 81.Sister Margaret, who had been moderator of the college's alumnae organization since 1994, was a member of the Caritas Community at the provincial house and coordinator of hospitality there and at the retreat center.Marie Tontz of Freeland, who was active among the alumnae, said that Sister Margaret was "a wonderful sister, kind and considerate and very, very friendly."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Sister Angela Neville, a former head nurse at Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, died July 11 of a coronary embolism at Howard County General Hospital. She was 82. Angela Neville, one of 15 children, was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a graduate of Seton High School and entered the Congregation of Bon Secours in 1947. She professed her final vows in 1956 at the Sisters of Bon Secours motherhouse in Paris. She was a Seton High School graduate and earned her nursing degree in 1953 from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Mary L. Booker, who rose through the ranks from classroom teacher to principal while mentoring her peers, died Jan. 9 of multiple myeloma at her Hamilton home. She was 57. "Mary L. Booker was a consummate educator and administrator. She was my principal mentor when I was a new principal and generously shared her decades of experience and insight with me," said interim city schools CEO Tisha Edwards. "She devoted her life to the children of Baltimore," Ms. Edwards said. "Her career embodied the highest standards of professionalism with deep personal dedication to her students and colleagues.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Sister Mary Frieda Chetelat, a nun with the Sisters of Mercy who was admired for her talents as a teacher, her social activism and her relentless humor, died on March 3. She was 97 and had been in the order for seven decades, during which she also was a principal at two Baltimore schools and a teacher at several others. She was born Bernadine Mary Chetelat on Dec. 18, 1913, the first of Harry and Frieda Chetelat's 10 children, all of whom were born in the family's home on Lasalle Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
Sister Angela Neville, a former head nurse at Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, died July 11 of a coronary embolism at Howard County General Hospital. She was 82. Angela Neville, one of 15 children, was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a graduate of Seton High School and entered the Congregation of Bon Secours in 1947. She professed her final vows in 1956 at the Sisters of Bon Secours motherhouse in Paris. She was a Seton High School graduate and earned her nursing degree in 1953 from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
Sharon Donoghue Knisely, a retired Social Security Administration analyst who headed the Archbishop Keough Alumnae Association, died April 16 on Frederick Road when she lost control of the motorcycle she was driving. She was 58 and lived in Catonsville. Born Sharon Marie Donoghue in Baltimore and raised on Wilkens Avenue, she attended St. Benedict's School. In 1965, she was among the first students to enroll at the new girls' Roman Catholic high school named after Archbishop Francis P. Keough.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
Helen Lauer, the matriarch of a family who founded two Anne Arundel County supermarkets and believed that traditionally made baked goods could win customers, died of lymphoma Wednesday at her Severna Park home. She was 80. Born Helen Beaudette in Baltimore, she grew up on Mallow Hill Road. She attended St. Mark's Parochial School in Catonsville and was a 1946 graduate of Seton High School. After marrying grocery store manager Edward Lauer 59 years ago, and raising five daughters, she and her husband moved to Anne Arundel County, where they fulfilled a dream of opening their own supermarket.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 9, 2009
Sister Elinor Hartman, a member of the Daughters of Charity who was a French teacher and historic documents translator, died April 28 of complications from a stroke at her order's retirement home in Emmitsburg. She was 82. Born Elinor Spence Hartman in Baltimore and raised on Rosebank Avenue, she attended St. Mary of the Assumption Parochial School and the old Seton High School on Charles Street. She graduated from a Newark, N.J., high school after her father was transferred there. She worked for an insurance company and assisted her parents while her elder brother, Richard A. Hartman, was in a German prisoner-of-war camp after the Battle of the Bulge during World War II. After his release and the war's end, she entered the Daughters of Charity.
NEWS
May 5, 2007
Sister Mary Margaret Nagle, a member of the Daughters of Charity and dietitian, died of old age complications April 26 at her order's retirement home in Emmitsburg. She was 94. Born in Kilconnell in County Clare, Ireland, she came to the United States in 1929 and entered the religious order in 1936. She became a convent, school and orphanage dietitian, and was the dietary director for the nuns at the old Seton High School in Charles Village from 1967 to 1988. After an assignment as a patient visitor at the old Jenkins Memorial Home on Caton Avenue in Southwest Baltimore, she moved to the retirement home, St. Joseph's Provincial House.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 9, 2009
Sister Elinor Hartman, a member of the Daughters of Charity who was a French teacher and historic documents translator, died April 28 of complications from a stroke at her order's retirement home in Emmitsburg. She was 82. Born Elinor Spence Hartman in Baltimore and raised on Rosebank Avenue, she attended St. Mary of the Assumption Parochial School and the old Seton High School on Charles Street. She graduated from a Newark, N.J., high school after her father was transferred there. She worked for an insurance company and assisted her parents while her elder brother, Richard A. Hartman, was in a German prisoner-of-war camp after the Battle of the Bulge during World War II. After his release and the war's end, she entered the Daughters of Charity.
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