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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
ADD SOME PIZAZZ to your diet with this low-calorie recipe. The delicious coating is a tasty combination of crunchy sesame seeds mixed with sour cream. The skinless, boneless chicken breast is then topped with a sweet yet tangy apricot sauce.The recipe calls for a reduced-calorie apricot spread. Read the label to be certain you are buying a spread with no more than 16 calories per two teaspoons.The recipe is from "Weight Watchers Quick and Easy Menu Cookbook."Sesame and Apricot Chicken1/2 cup plain dried bread crumbs1 tablespoon sesame seeds2 tablespoons sour cream1 teaspoon lemon juice1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce1 garlic clove, minced, dividedSalt and pepper to taste2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts2 teaspoons vegetable oil3 tablespoons reduced-calorie apricot spread (16 calories per 2 teaspoons)
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Corner Pantry chef and co-owner Neill Howell is known for his way with British specialties and his fresh, easy take on casual meals. Here, he combines some of late summer's best ingredients, from bright yellow watermelon to herbs clipped from the garden, in a colorful and simple-to-make salad. Tossed with citrusy soy dressing and topped with duck cooked in its own fat then re-crisped in a hot oven, the salad is fresh, savory and full of late summer's most-loved flavors. Yellow Watermelon & Crispy Duck Salad with Sesame Soy Dressing Yield: Two entrée-size salads For the sesame soy dressing: 1 tablespoon yellow rock sugar (crystallized cane sugar available at Asian grocery stores and online)
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 17, 2003
My husband, who is not a tuna aficionado, recently changed his mind about this distinctive fish. During the past few months, while dining at one of our favorite bistros in Paris, he ordered sesame-coated tuna steaks on three separate occasions. Each time I looked on in surprise as he devoured a beautiful tuna steak coated with golden sesame seeds. The clever chef deserves credit for my spouse's turnaround. First, the cook thought of pairing the smooth textured fish with the slightly crunchy seeds.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | July 20, 2012
Along about now, the grill as a culinary appliance begins to pall. Not that grilling isn't still the preferred summertime cooking method, both for everyday meals and for deck parties. But, still, we get a little nostalgic for fixing a quick supper inside - in the air conditioning. And, perhaps we even long to hark back to the good old days and fix something that's a perennial favorite with the gang. When in that mood, when we're seeking something fast, and relatively light, and "acceptable" to everybody's palates, at our house we tend to turn to chicken.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 14, 1999
More often than not when entertaining in the fall, I'll include a warm, robust soup as part of my menu. My penchant for potages is not serendipitous but rather deliberate. I love to serve soup for several reasons.Most important is the fact that soups generally improve in flavor when made in advance. I dislike hectic, last-minute cooking when friends come to dinner, and soups, which have been cooked ahead, need only a quick reheating at serving time. Then, of course, there's the versatility of soups; they can begin or anchor a meal.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2009
Honey, ginger and soy sauce lend a sweet-savory flavor to this quick-cooked chicken. A coating of sesame seeds brightens the dish and adds crunch. Toasted sesame seeds and sesame oil have a rich flavor. Instead of toasting the seeds, I buy a jar of them already toasted in the sushi section of the supermarket. Toasted sesame oil, found in the Asian section, is good to keep on hand for flavoring vegetables and salads. Boneless, skinless chicken breasts can be used instead of thighs; cook to 170 degrees.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | February 7, 2007
XS 1307 N. Charles St. -- 410-468-0002 Hours --7 a.m.-midnight Mondays-Thursdays; 7 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 9 a.m.-midnight Sundays Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --8 minutes Though this order, $8.35, was the least oily, it bordered on bland. Marinated chicken seasoned with a few sesame seeds sat on top a bed of mostly tasteless noodles and chopped vegetables.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
After our long, cold winter with its short, often gray days, everyone in New England welcomes the arrival of spring. I look forward to the new produce that arrives in our markets, and to being able to set up our grill in the backyard once again. One spring menu that I am planning to serve soon will begin with bowls of light cream of watercress soup, followed by grilled sesame flank steaks garnished with grilled green onions. Steamed peas and gingered carrots will accompany the meat, and an almond cake with sliced strawberries and whipped cream will end the dinner.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 15, 2006
My husband, a quintessential extrovert, never met a stranger, so after several decades of living with him, I'm no longer surprised when he mentions that he's invited friends over for wine and appetizers. He often asks a group of his fellow professors who are working on a project together to meet at our house for drinks, or he'll arrive home from work, announcing that he's met some new people I am certain to like, and that they can stop by for cocktails on such and such a day. He reasons that having guests in for sips and nibbles is not the same as a dinner party, so he can be spontaneous.
NEWS
By Bill Daley | May 30, 2007
Microwaving is one of the newest cooking methods yet it has much in common with two of the most ancient, steaming and poaching. With a covered plate and a little liquid, the microwave oven cooks food fast without burning or drying it out. These Asian-inspired chicken rolls can be served hot, cold or at room temperature. Feel free to improvise with both filling and sauce, shifting from country to country for inspiration. Make it French with mushroom duxelles, tarragon and hollandaise. Or go Spanish with diced ham, green olives and olive oil. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 3, 2012
Want something a little healthier this year to snack on during the Super Bowl? Alison Massey, a dietitian at Mercy Medical Center, has some “touchdowns” to replace those “fumbles.” See if there's something that scores with you: +Mixed Nuts (1/2 cup=320kcals) vs Sweet & Spicy Snack Mix (1/2 cup=170kcals) (*recipe below) +Sour Cream and Onion Dip vs Caramelized Onion Dip made with nonfat sour cream and plain Greek yogurt (**recipe below) +Hot Wings with Blue Cheese Dressing vs Baked Spicy Wings with low-fat Blue Cheese Dressing +Nachos (9'inch plate=860kcals)
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2009
Honey, ginger and soy sauce lend a sweet-savory flavor to this quick-cooked chicken. A coating of sesame seeds brightens the dish and adds crunch. Toasted sesame seeds and sesame oil have a rich flavor. Instead of toasting the seeds, I buy a jar of them already toasted in the sushi section of the supermarket. Toasted sesame oil, found in the Asian section, is good to keep on hand for flavoring vegetables and salads. Boneless, skinless chicken breasts can be used instead of thighs; cook to 170 degrees.
NEWS
By Peter Reinhart and Peter Reinhart,Los Angeles Times | June 25, 2008
I'm ready to start a home-baked cracker revolution to match the bread revolution of the past 15 years. I've spent nearly two decades trying to persuade folks to bake their own bread and, most recently, asked the nearly impossible: Make 100 percent whole-grain breads at home. It's been a noble, uphill battle. But I've encountered far less resistance in urging people to make their own whole-grain crackers - toasty, nutty, crisp, crackly crackers. Why the receptivity? It's probably because crackers are far easier and faster to make than breads.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | April 9, 2008
Sue Miller of Canton, Ohio, was looking for a recipe for healthful homemade granola bars. Laura Pierce of Easthampton, Mass., sent in a recipe she found online at Mother Earth News. The recipe was developed some years ago by Denise Garoutte for her family. She says feel free to use her basic recipe as a guideline and make changes and additions that suit your family's tastes and preferences. I followed the core recipe. The only substitution I made was dried cherries for the raisins because I know my kids really like them, but you could add just about anything, I would think.
NEWS
By Bill Daley | May 30, 2007
Microwaving is one of the newest cooking methods yet it has much in common with two of the most ancient, steaming and poaching. With a covered plate and a little liquid, the microwave oven cooks food fast without burning or drying it out. These Asian-inspired chicken rolls can be served hot, cold or at room temperature. Feel free to improvise with both filling and sauce, shifting from country to country for inspiration. Make it French with mushroom duxelles, tarragon and hollandaise. Or go Spanish with diced ham, green olives and olive oil. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | February 7, 2007
XS 1307 N. Charles St. -- 410-468-0002 Hours --7 a.m.-midnight Mondays-Thursdays; 7 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays; 9 a.m.-midnight Sundays Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --8 minutes Though this order, $8.35, was the least oily, it bordered on bland. Marinated chicken seasoned with a few sesame seeds sat on top a bed of mostly tasteless noodles and chopped vegetables.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY. | April 26, 2006
When a bag of kale showed up on the doorstep, courtesy of our neighbors departing on an unexpected trip, it raised the age-old question: What to do? What to do? Somehow Asian flavors came to mind, a departure in our house where almost everything has a Mediterranean influence. With ginger root and a few other flavorings, this dish quickly came together. Pork chops were in the fridge, so they became the protein - but chicken would be a delicious substitute. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe and analysis.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | December 6, 2006
The Big Book of Appetizers By Meredith Deeds and Carla Snyder Williams-Sonoma Cocktail Parties By Georgeanne Brennan Free Press / 2006 / $24.95 With its eye-catching photos, handy checklists, work plans and food-and-drink pairings, this offering from Williams-Sonoma had us at hello -- until we perused the "Winter Cocktails" section, which we found short on substance for this important entertaining season. While pomegranate sparklers made for a nice, nonalcoholic drink idea, the recipes, including cheese fondue and oysters Rockefeller, lacked zip. But the "Wine & Cheese Party" section offered a measure of redemption -- a recipe for tasty, fun Cheddar- Cheese-and- Sesame Bites that we know we'll make again and again.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | December 6, 2006
The Big Book of Appetizers By Meredith Deeds and Carla Snyder Williams-Sonoma Cocktail Parties By Georgeanne Brennan Free Press / 2006 / $24.95 With its eye-catching photos, handy checklists, work plans and food-and-drink pairings, this offering from Williams-Sonoma had us at hello -- until we perused the "Winter Cocktails" section, which we found short on substance for this important entertaining season. While pomegranate sparklers made for a nice, nonalcoholic drink idea, the recipes, including cheese fondue and oysters Rockefeller, lacked zip. But the "Wine & Cheese Party" section offered a measure of redemption -- a recipe for tasty, fun Cheddar- Cheese-and- Sesame Bites that we know we'll make again and again.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 15, 2006
My husband, a quintessential extrovert, never met a stranger, so after several decades of living with him, I'm no longer surprised when he mentions that he's invited friends over for wine and appetizers. He often asks a group of his fellow professors who are working on a project together to meet at our house for drinks, or he'll arrive home from work, announcing that he's met some new people I am certain to like, and that they can stop by for cocktails on such and such a day. He reasons that having guests in for sips and nibbles is not the same as a dinner party, so he can be spontaneous.
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