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NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2009
Honey, ginger and soy sauce lend a sweet-savory flavor to this quick-cooked chicken. A coating of sesame seeds brightens the dish and adds crunch. Toasted sesame seeds and sesame oil have a rich flavor. Instead of toasting the seeds, I buy a jar of them already toasted in the sushi section of the supermarket. Toasted sesame oil, found in the Asian section, is good to keep on hand for flavoring vegetables and salads. Boneless, skinless chicken breasts can be used instead of thighs; cook to 170 degrees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette
The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
As the morning of our third-week pickup dawned, I pulled the Post-it notes off our refrigerator: We had done it. We'd successfully eaten everything from Week 2, except half a head of broccoli. On to Week 3! This week's share included turnips, beets, radishes, onions, carrots, lettuce, raspberries - and more broccoli. A huge, giant, enormous head of broccoli. Clearly, I needed a broccoli dish to take advantage of this bounty. I settled down with a stack of cookbooks and the pint of fresh raspberries, snacking as I rejected recipe after recipe.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
My husband's mid-summer birthday fortuitously coincides with the time of year when lobsters are in season and the prices start to drop. It's not surprising, then, that every July he hints that lobster would be a fine addition to his celebration supper. Among New England's seafood specialties, the lobster roll is an all-time favorite of mine. It is composed of cooked, diced lobster and chopped celery bound with mayonnaise and often scented with lemon, then mounded on lightly toasted, crustless, hot-dog-style rolls.
NEWS
By Faith Hicks, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a post on nutrition topics for The Baltimore Sun's Picture of Health blog (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Faith Hicks weighs in on encouraging kids to eat their vegetables. Most of us realize we aren't eating the recommended number of fruits and vegetables per day. Our kids' plates are falling short, too. Less than 25 percent of American kids are regularly eating the recommended number of vegetables.
FEATURES
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | January 1, 1997
To judge from supermarket shelves, chefs aren't the only ones who have discovered the richness of Far Eastern cuisine. Asian ingredients are no longer relegated to ethnic markets with strange-looking canned goods and dried fish lining the aisles.Supermarkets also are carrying a wide array of Asian items and they are no longer banished to the ethnic food aisle either. If you're just discovering this, you may want to start with just three items. We recommend adding rice wine vinegar, lemon grass and sesame oil to your shopping list.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 14, 1999
More often than not when entertaining in the fall, I'll include a warm, robust soup as part of my menu. My penchant for potages is not serendipitous but rather deliberate. I love to serve soup for several reasons.Most important is the fact that soups generally improve in flavor when made in advance. I dislike hectic, last-minute cooking when friends come to dinner, and soups, which have been cooked ahead, need only a quick reheating at serving time. Then, of course, there's the versatility of soups; they can begin or anchor a meal.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
After our long, cold winter with its short, often gray days, everyone in New England welcomes the arrival of spring. I look forward to the new produce that arrives in our markets, and to being able to set up our grill in the backyard once again. One spring menu that I am planning to serve soon will begin with bowls of light cream of watercress soup, followed by grilled sesame flank steaks garnished with grilled green onions. Steamed peas and gingered carrots will accompany the meat, and an almond cake with sliced strawberries and whipped cream will end the dinner.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 1996
To welcome the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Rat, as it enters on Feb. 19, here's a quick, but celebratory feast. This recipe was inspired by the new "Hot" cookbook series by Hugh Carpenter (Ten Speed Press). "Hot Wok" and "Hot Chicken" are now in bookstores. This particular dish has been simplified a bit without sacrificing the original character.You can add some Oriental crunch to the entree with a crisp fresh salad enlivened with tangerines or oranges.As a final toast to the King Rat, offer a platter of large chunks of dried fruit such as pears, pineapple, apricots or papaya, with vanilla pudding used as a dip.Beef and fusilliServes 412 ounces tricolor fusilliSAUCE:1/2 cup vegetable or beef stock4 cloves garlic, minced1/4 cup dry sherry or rice wine1 tablespoon cornstarch1 teaspoon tomato paste2 tablespoons oyster sauce1 tablespoon sesame oil1 cup baby carrots, halved lengthwise12 ounces lean beef cut into thin strips1 1/2 pound assorted wild and small domestic mushrooms, cut into bite-size pieces1 cup snow peas, stem end removed3 whole green onions, cut into thin diagonal piecesPut a large pot of water on to boil.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | January 16, 1991
For years, Americans have heard about the health benefits of eating like the Chinese. Properly prepared Oriental food is generally lower in fat and higher in complex carbohydrates than typical Western fare.Steamed Shrimp Dumplings 8 ounces raw shrimp, peeled and deveined (about 16 large shrimp)8 ounces ground turkey2 green onions, finely minced1 large stalk celery, finely chopped (about 1 cup)1 tablespoon rice wine or dry sherry1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce1 teaspoon sesame oil (available in Oriental markets)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 2, 1994
With a title as lyrical as "Women From the Lake of Scented Souls," the Charles' new Chinese film might be expected to be as delicate as a Ming vase, full of wispy, foggy Asian landscapes and delicate doomed lovers, set in a mythical feudal past.It turns out to be set right in the middle of now, and it's about as romantic as an outhouse. And that, even further, turns out not to be bad, but good.The movie, which won the Golden Bear at the 1993 Berlin Film Festival, is a sturdily melodramatic tale of the provincial petit-bourgeoise, particularly women, in the new China, and what grotesque burdens they bear and how they nevertheless triumph.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | March 20, 2012
Most every home cook has a particular approach to the weeknight meal. Some of us are really into doing ahead. Slow cookers are their thing. On the other hand, unless we're whipping up goodies for a dinner party, others of us can't bear the thoughts of starting supper in the wee hours of the workaday morning so it'll be ready at dinner time. (And we certainly don't want to deal with it the night before.) Indeed, the only challenge we're willing to take on in the morning is figuring out what to remove from the freezer to thaw for later.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 8, 2009
Honey, ginger and soy sauce lend a sweet-savory flavor to this quick-cooked chicken. A coating of sesame seeds brightens the dish and adds crunch. Toasted sesame seeds and sesame oil have a rich flavor. Instead of toasting the seeds, I buy a jar of them already toasted in the sushi section of the supermarket. Toasted sesame oil, found in the Asian section, is good to keep on hand for flavoring vegetables and salads. Boneless, skinless chicken breasts can be used instead of thighs; cook to 170 degrees.
NEWS
By Joannah Hill and Joannah Hill,Sun reporter | December 5, 2007
Pure Dessert By Alice Medrich Desserts by the Yard By Sherry Yard Houghton Mifflin / 2007 / $35.95 I was thrilled to discover Sherry Yard's new dessert book, because now I know what to serve should Hugh Grant come calling (Chocolate-Caramel Tart). And if faced with a mob of sugar-starved Academy Award winners, I know exactly what to whip up (Chocolate Truffle Tarts with Chocolate Creme Brulee Diamonds and Seven-Bean Vanilla Ice Cream). Yard, the executive pastry chef at Spago Beverly Hills, combines cookbook and memoir in this collection of recipes that ranges from her Brooklyn beginnings to the razzle-dazzle of Hollywood.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 2, 2004
Quick, easy, eye-catching, delicious, healthy. Those are adjectives I would use to describe an ideal main course for today's entertaining. Students in my classes, friends, family members -- in fact, everyone I talk to -- tells me they are pressed for time and welcome recipes that take just minutes to assemble and cook. Many, especially first timers in the kitchen, are drawn to dishes that require modest culinary skills but still make a distinctive visual impression. And all cooks expect their efforts to result in delectable fare.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 17, 2003
My husband, who is not a tuna aficionado, recently changed his mind about this distinctive fish. During the past few months, while dining at one of our favorite bistros in Paris, he ordered sesame-coated tuna steaks on three separate occasions. Each time I looked on in surprise as he devoured a beautiful tuna steak coated with golden sesame seeds. The clever chef deserves credit for my spouse's turnaround. First, the cook thought of pairing the smooth textured fish with the slightly crunchy seeds.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
My husband's mid-summer birthday fortuitously coincides with the time of year when lobsters are in season and the prices start to drop. It's not surprising, then, that every July he hints that lobster would be a fine addition to his celebration supper. Among New England's seafood specialties, the lobster roll is an all-time favorite of mine. It is composed of cooked, diced lobster and chopped celery bound with mayonnaise and often scented with lemon, then mounded on lightly toasted, crustless, hot-dog-style rolls.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 17, 2003
My husband, who is not a tuna aficionado, recently changed his mind about this distinctive fish. During the past few months, while dining at one of our favorite bistros in Paris, he ordered sesame-coated tuna steaks on three separate occasions. Each time I looked on in surprise as he devoured a beautiful tuna steak coated with golden sesame seeds. The clever chef deserves credit for my spouse's turnaround. First, the cook thought of pairing the smooth textured fish with the slightly crunchy seeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1998
A few years back, spoilsports at the Center for Science in the Public Interest took some of the fun out of eating Chinese food when they calculated the nutritional value of kung pao chicken and other dishes. The calorie and fat gram counts were astronomically high.Now, chef and restaurateur John Luen has opened an Asian restaurant in Pikesville that is dedicated to serving healthy Chinese and Japanese food. Luen, who has cooked in kitchens from Hong Kong to Nigeria, starts each dish with a prudent amount of olive oil and finishes most with a smidgen of sesame oil. That's how his restaurant, Olive and Sesame, came to be named.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Let's cut to the chase: Any semi-serious chef would be delighted to have a copy of On Cooking: Techniques From Expert Chefs (Prentice Hall, $50). Stuffed with more than 900 recipes and expert tips from big-time chefs like Wolfgang Puck and Alfred Portale and a whole lot of less-well-known names, this heavyweight cookbook is a worthy kitchen addition for anyone who is serious about food. But there's a catch (isn't there always one?). While the book is instructive - there are long passages on basic techniques like filleting fish and grilling meat - this is not for the beginner or perhaps even the advanced beginner.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
After our long, cold winter with its short, often gray days, everyone in New England welcomes the arrival of spring. I look forward to the new produce that arrives in our markets, and to being able to set up our grill in the backyard once again. One spring menu that I am planning to serve soon will begin with bowls of light cream of watercress soup, followed by grilled sesame flank steaks garnished with grilled green onions. Steamed peas and gingered carrots will accompany the meat, and an almond cake with sliced strawberries and whipped cream will end the dinner.
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