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By Julie Rothman, Special to the Star-Telegram | April 26, 2012
Marjorie Cicala from Middle River was looking for baked Sesame Chicken recipe that was demonstrated by a poultry distribution company at the Maryland State Fair in the 1960s and that she and her brothers and sister all loved. She said that the recipe for the delicious baked chicken with sesame seeds that her mother had written down was stolen from her purse at a school event some time ago. While no readers responded to Cicala's original query, I thought this was worth a little investigating.
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By Donna Ellis | July 20, 2012
Along about now, the grill as a culinary appliance begins to pall. Not that grilling isn't still the preferred summertime cooking method, both for everyday meals and for deck parties. But, still, we get a little nostalgic for fixing a quick supper inside - in the air conditioning. And, perhaps we even long to hark back to the good old days and fix something that's a perennial favorite with the gang. When in that mood, when we're seeking something fast, and relatively light, and "acceptable" to everybody's palates, at our house we tend to turn to chicken.
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By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | December 19, 1992
Harryman HouseHarryman House, 340 Main St., Reisterstown, (410) 833-8850. This is a place that's both a special-occasion restaurant and one where you drop in after a hard day at work. The specialty is small-town friendliness, but the Harryman House has some big-time ideas about food, like wild mushroom fricassee and grilled duck breast -- in a setting where you might expect fried chicken and homemade biscuits. That duck breast was the best dish of the evening; we liked the steak Diane and poached salmon, but wished more thought had gone into the presentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to the Star-Telegram | April 26, 2012
Marjorie Cicala from Middle River was looking for baked Sesame Chicken recipe that was demonstrated by a poultry distribution company at the Maryland State Fair in the 1960s and that she and her brothers and sister all loved. She said that the recipe for the delicious baked chicken with sesame seeds that her mother had written down was stolen from her purse at a school event some time ago. While no readers responded to Cicala's original query, I thought this was worth a little investigating.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen | September 21, 1991
HUNAN MANOR7091 Deepage Drive in Columbia. Hours: Lunch served 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays; dinner served 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, 3 p.m. to 11 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays. Phone: 381-1137, 381-1134. Fax: 381-1138 Hunan Manor is a classy place to eat, with soft pink decor as well as soft lighting. The restaurant draws praises from the most critical Asian eaters and boasts a large following from Americans as well. If you're on the go and don't have time for a sit-down meal, the restaurant offers an attractive menu for carryout.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 24, 1993
The Panda Chinese Gourmet 6080 Falls Road at Lake Avenue. Hours: Monday through Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Sunday 1 to 10 p.m. Call: (410) 377-4228.On a good week when there's time to cook, we probably have fried rice from the Panda only two or three times for dinner. This has been going on for about four months now, and I'm still not sick of the Panda's chicken fried rice. This is the highest praise I can think to give carryout Chinese. If two people are going to make a dinner out of it, go with the quart size for $8.50.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2000
Tucked between a pizza restaurant and a 7-Eleven, the outside of Hunan House gives no hint as to what awaits you inside. In Cherry Tree Center facing U.S. 29, the restaurant specializes in Chinese cuisine - Hunan and Szechuan - tastes familiar to many diners. But there is something different about Hunan House, as indicated by the lunch and weekend crowds - something that has people lined up waiting for carryout. The secret is in the sauce, according to owner-manager Alice Dan. "All sauces are made here ... fresh," she said.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | July 20, 2012
Along about now, the grill as a culinary appliance begins to pall. Not that grilling isn't still the preferred summertime cooking method, both for everyday meals and for deck parties. But, still, we get a little nostalgic for fixing a quick supper inside - in the air conditioning. And, perhaps we even long to hark back to the good old days and fix something that's a perennial favorite with the gang. When in that mood, when we're seeking something fast, and relatively light, and "acceptable" to everybody's palates, at our house we tend to turn to chicken.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
There are several China Woks scattered around Baltimore. The one in Towson, in the York Road Plaza, is an ambience-free carryout with dependable service that works well for parents looking to feed kids after Little League games. Unfortunately, on our recent visit, we came across little to recommend in the cuisine department. As with so many low-cost Chinese restaurants, this China Wok seems determined not to upset customers by over-seasoning any of its food. For appetizers, we tried steamed pork dumplings ($3.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1998
A few years back, spoilsports at the Center for Science in the Public Interest took some of the fun out of eating Chinese food when they calculated the nutritional value of kung pao chicken and other dishes. The calorie and fat gram counts were astronomically high.Now, chef and restaurateur John Luen has opened an Asian restaurant in Pikesville that is dedicated to serving healthy Chinese and Japanese food. Luen, who has cooked in kitchens from Hong Kong to Nigeria, starts each dish with a prudent amount of olive oil and finishes most with a smidgen of sesame oil. That's how his restaurant, Olive and Sesame, came to be named.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Reporter | May 16, 2007
More dangers lurk in those tempting by-the-pound hot food bars than you can imagine. See that yummy-looking Sesame Chicken, for instance? If you eat too many of them or have them too often, those crispy little nuggets in their thick, sweet sauce are a heart attack or stroke waiting to happen. A cup serving can contain more than 300 calories, 9 grams of fat and 700 milligrams of sodium. But the news isn't all bad. We decided to head for Wegmans' Wokery, the Hunt Valley supermarket's Asian hot food bar, for the latest in our monthly Make Over My Meal series -- a reporter (me)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2005
Noodles Corner, a small, successful Asian restaurant in Columbia, has a few tables, groovy halogen lights hanging from the high ceiling, a nice wooden counter where carryout patrons wait -- and an amazing swan. This swan, which sits at the carryout counter, is made from hundreds of pieces of paper ripped from magazines and folded into small shapes that interlock to form the bird's body, neck and head. It stands about 8 inches high and deserves a spot in the American Visionary Art Museum.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2005
It may be hard to find Hunan Wok, but it offers some decent rewards for those who do. The small Chinese eatery is tucked into a space at the back of the Atrium at Greenspring Shopping Center, just north of the city limits between Mount Washington and Pikesville. That it manages to stay in business in its out-of-the-way location confirms that the Wok knows how to satisfy. With a number of guests to feed, we ventured in the other night to order an astonishing amount of food. Hunan Wok has several tables, and a few modest lanterns and pictures as decoration.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
There are several China Woks scattered around Baltimore. The one in Towson, in the York Road Plaza, is an ambience-free carryout with dependable service that works well for parents looking to feed kids after Little League games. Unfortunately, on our recent visit, we came across little to recommend in the cuisine department. As with so many low-cost Chinese restaurants, this China Wok seems determined not to upset customers by over-seasoning any of its food. For appetizers, we tried steamed pork dumplings ($3.95)
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2000
Tucked between a pizza restaurant and a 7-Eleven, the outside of Hunan House gives no hint as to what awaits you inside. In Cherry Tree Center facing U.S. 29, the restaurant specializes in Chinese cuisine - Hunan and Szechuan - tastes familiar to many diners. But there is something different about Hunan House, as indicated by the lunch and weekend crowds - something that has people lined up waiting for carryout. The secret is in the sauce, according to owner-manager Alice Dan. "All sauces are made here ... fresh," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1998
A few years back, spoilsports at the Center for Science in the Public Interest took some of the fun out of eating Chinese food when they calculated the nutritional value of kung pao chicken and other dishes. The calorie and fat gram counts were astronomically high.Now, chef and restaurateur John Luen has opened an Asian restaurant in Pikesville that is dedicated to serving healthy Chinese and Japanese food. Luen, who has cooked in kitchens from Hong Kong to Nigeria, starts each dish with a prudent amount of olive oil and finishes most with a smidgen of sesame oil. That's how his restaurant, Olive and Sesame, came to be named.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2005
It may be hard to find Hunan Wok, but it offers some decent rewards for those who do. The small Chinese eatery is tucked into a space at the back of the Atrium at Greenspring Shopping Center, just north of the city limits between Mount Washington and Pikesville. That it manages to stay in business in its out-of-the-way location confirms that the Wok knows how to satisfy. With a number of guests to feed, we ventured in the other night to order an astonishing amount of food. Hunan Wok has several tables, and a few modest lanterns and pictures as decoration.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2005
Noodles Corner, a small, successful Asian restaurant in Columbia, has a few tables, groovy halogen lights hanging from the high ceiling, a nice wooden counter where carryout patrons wait -- and an amazing swan. This swan, which sits at the carryout counter, is made from hundreds of pieces of paper ripped from magazines and folded into small shapes that interlock to form the bird's body, neck and head. It stands about 8 inches high and deserves a spot in the American Visionary Art Museum.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 24, 1993
The Panda Chinese Gourmet 6080 Falls Road at Lake Avenue. Hours: Monday through Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Sunday 1 to 10 p.m. Call: (410) 377-4228.On a good week when there's time to cook, we probably have fried rice from the Panda only two or three times for dinner. This has been going on for about four months now, and I'm still not sick of the Panda's chicken fried rice. This is the highest praise I can think to give carryout Chinese. If two people are going to make a dinner out of it, go with the quart size for $8.50.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | December 19, 1992
Harryman HouseHarryman House, 340 Main St., Reisterstown, (410) 833-8850. This is a place that's both a special-occasion restaurant and one where you drop in after a hard day at work. The specialty is small-town friendliness, but the Harryman House has some big-time ideas about food, like wild mushroom fricassee and grilled duck breast -- in a setting where you might expect fried chicken and homemade biscuits. That duck breast was the best dish of the evening; we liked the steak Diane and poached salmon, but wished more thought had gone into the presentation.
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