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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
Richard V. Biggs Jr. -- who already oversees many of Howard County's computer services -- has been named head of the county's new, 105-worker Technology and Communication Services Department, which comes into existence July 1.The department, an initiative of County Executive Charles I. Ecker approved by the County Council this year, combines technology services from several departments and has a budget of $8.6 million. It will have authority over computerized mapping, the county's cable channel, 911 dispatch communications, telephones and information services.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
The fresh trout, $6.99 a pound, lay glistening on ice in a case at the Reisterstown Road Giant Food in Owings Mills earlier this week. There also was tilapia and cod and shrimp nestled in the frosty chips. But during the next few months, the familiar case of seafood dinner choices at this store and more than 50 Giant outlets in the region will be removed. In their place will be refrigerators and freezers filled with pre-packaged fish as the grocery chain moves to a self-service system in a little over a quarter of its 190 stores in the region.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
The Howard County Department of Social Services is offering free bus rides to its clients from Dobbin Center in east Columbia to the agency's new offices in the Gateway Industrial Park off Route 175.As part of the service, the agency also will give rides to the County Government Gateway Building, where other county agencies that help low-income, elderly and disabled residents are housed.The bus service -- offered through a contract between the social services department and the non-profit Urban Rural Transportation Authority -- began yesterday.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
Several people went to juvenile court yesterday claiming to be relatives of an abandoned baby girl found in an East Baltimore alley Saturday morning. The Baltimore Department of Social Services placed the toddler in foster care after neighbors found her about 9 a.m. Saturday behind the 100 block of N. Wolfe St. in the Washington Hill neighborhood. The girl, thought to be about 1 year old, was in a stroller, wearing a pink-and-white hooded sweat shirt and blue jeans. People saying they were relatives arrived at Baltimore Circuit Court as attorneys for social services asked a judge to formally place the girl in the department's care.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1995
The Howard County Department of Social Services will close its Ellicott City office at noon tomorrow and all day Friday to move its operations to the Gateway office park in east Columbia.Some staff members will be available on both days to take emergency assistance applications, but requests for other assistance should be made at the department's new location on Monday.The department provides assistance through such programs as Aid to Families with Dependent Children, food stamps, medical assistance, court-ordered child support, adoptions, foster care and protective services.
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
USF&G Corp. this morning laid off 110 employees out of 680 in the company's information services department as part of what executives said was a new strategy aimed at better serving the insurer's various product divisions.The layoffs follow two years of cost-cutting and staff reductions at the Baltimore-based insurance company. Those moves saw the work force drop by more than 40 percent to its current level of 7,200.But unlike the previous rounds of layoffs, the company said, today's reductions were not intended to cut costs, but to make the information services department more effective.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
It's just 6 cents a month, but the state government's going to be taking a little less out of your pocket.The Schaefer administration announced yesterday that the monthly fee Maryland phone subscribers pay to support a service that provides telephone links for hearing- and speech-impaired people will fall from 21 cents to 15 cents as of October.The surcharge, which appears on Marylanders' monthly phone bills, is reviewed annually and adjusted to reflect the costs of running the Maryland Relay System.
NEWS
September 23, 1994
BALTIMORE Realtor James Crockett claimed legendary 2500 Eutaw Place for $117,500 at an auction last Friday -- a price he considers "a steal."Mr. Crockett is convinced that with the Emersonian, the Esplanade and the Temple Gardens all undergoing a $35 million renovation, the area is bound to rebound in the near future.Capt. Isaac Emerson, inventor of Bromo-Seltzer, built 2500 Eutaw Place for his home in 1895. The Reservoir Hill property has in recent years been but a shadow of its former self, housing offices since the 1950s.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
The Rev. William Henry Snyder, a retired minister and a Harford County social services director, died Sunday after heart surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89 and lived in Towson. He was pastor of what is now Olive Branch Good Shepherd United Methodist Church on Fort Avenue during the 1950s and 1960s. Born in Middleburg, Pa, he was raised in Hampden and attended City College in the 1920s before graduating from Berwick High School in Berwick, Pa. He earned a degree in architectural engineering from Pennsylvania State University.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
USF&G Corp. laid off 110 of the 680 employees in the company's information services department yesterday as part of what executives said was a new strategy to provide better internal services to the insurer's various product divisions.The layoffs followed two years of cost-cutting and staff reductions at the Baltimore-based insurance company. Those moves shrank the work force by more than 40 percent, to its current level of about 7,200 nationwide (2,273 in Baltimore).But unlike the previous rounds of layoffs, the company said, yesterday's reductions were not intended merely to cut costs, but to make the information services department more effective.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2004
Politics may have derailed Floyd R. Blair's chance at permanently serving as Baltimore's social services chief. But the tug-of-war over his appointment between Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Democratic Mayor Martin O'Malley ended ideally for Blair yesterday: Instead of losing a job, he landed a promotion. In a surprise move that quelled a yearlong dispute over Blair's role as interim director of Baltimore's social services agency, Ehrlich promoted him to oversee all such local agencies in Maryland.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Faced with questions about the deaths of children under his agency's watch and cutbacks in aid for disabled people, the head of the state's social services department is promising to improve the attitudes and training of caseworkers. "For years, the status quo was accepted at the Baltimore Department of Social Services. But the status quo is unacceptable to me and to the governor, so we are going to make thoughtful, deliberative changes in personnel, practices and programs," said Christopher J. McCabe, secretary of the state Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
The Rev. William Henry Snyder, a retired minister and a Harford County social services director, died Sunday after heart surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89 and lived in Towson. He was pastor of what is now Olive Branch Good Shepherd United Methodist Church on Fort Avenue during the 1950s and 1960s. Born in Middleburg, Pa, he was raised in Hampden and attended City College in the 1920s before graduating from Berwick High School in Berwick, Pa. He earned a degree in architectural engineering from Pennsylvania State University.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
As Baltimore officials prepare to crack down on delinquent water accounts, they also are scrambling to develop a plan and find the money to help poor families faced with water cutoffs. Mayor Martin O'Malley announced last week that the city will start turning off water to customers who are at least six months behind in their payments and owe more than $500. The change, which takes effect in December, reverses an eight-year policy of not terminating water service, no matter how much was owed.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A developer's plans to build a 265-unit retirement community along Bennett Road in Eldersburg will further strain the area's already taxed fire and ambulance services, fire officials say. The development is part of a boom in retirement home construction in South Carroll, creating a burden for the volunteers providing emergency services, said Bobby Ray Chesney, chief of the Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department. "The more of these developments you build, the more you are taxing our ability to service them," said Chesney.
NEWS
August 9, 1998
John E. Custy Jr., 75, CPA, vice president at arts instituteJohn Edward "Jack" Custy Jr., former vice president of business affairs at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, died of a stroke Monday at Manor Care Ruxton. He was 75.Mr. Custy was vice president of the college from 1964 until he retired in 1986."For a man who wasn't an artist, Jack's gift was understanding and being compassionate with artists," said longtime friend Peter Collier, an artist and former teacher at the college.Born and raised in West Baltimore, he was a 1942 graduate of Calvert Hall College and earned his bachelor's degree from Loyola College in 1947.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
Youth Services International Inc., an Owings Mills-based operator of educational and correctional programs for troubled youths, said yesterday that it plans to acquire Developmental Behavioral Consultants Inc. and its 18 group homes in Arizona.Youth Services said it expects the Phoenix-based company's homes for emotionally troubled young people to add about $4 million to its annual revenue, which came to $34.9 million last year. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.The publicly traded Maryland company, led by Jiffy Lube founder W. James Hindman, operates 12 programs in seven states that provide counseling and education to delinquent children or children at risk of becoming delinquents.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Faced with questions about the deaths of children under his agency's watch and cutbacks in aid for disabled people, the head of the state's social services department is promising to improve the attitudes and training of caseworkers. "For years, the status quo was accepted at the Baltimore Department of Social Services. But the status quo is unacceptable to me and to the governor, so we are going to make thoughtful, deliberative changes in personnel, practices and programs," said Christopher J. McCabe, secretary of the state Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
The fifth-floor auditorium of Baltimore's police headquarters, normally the scene of solemn events such as academy graduations and medal ceremonies, rocked during the lunch hour yesterday with the evangelical fervor of a revival.Uniformed police officers, plainclothes detectives and civilian workers filled the room with gospel music, clapping and "Amens" during the department's first interfaith worship service."I'm just praising God for the opportunity to see people of faith come together," said a slightly out-of-breath Aloma Taylor after the hourlong service.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
Richard V. Biggs Jr. -- who already oversees many of Howard County's computer services -- has been named head of the county's new, 105-worker Technology and Communication Services Department, which comes into existence July 1.The department, an initiative of County Executive Charles I. Ecker approved by the County Council this year, combines technology services from several departments and has a budget of $8.6 million. It will have authority over computerized mapping, the county's cable channel, 911 dispatch communications, telephones and information services.
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