Advertisement
HomeCollectionsService Workers
IN THE NEWS

Service Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The labor union representing Johns Hopkins Hospital's service workers has reached a bargaining impasse with hospital officials and expects to strike Friday. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union gave notice last week to authorize a four-day strike, which would be its second in two months after a three-day strike in April. The union's spokesman, Jim McNeill, said Wednesday night that the two groups had spent the day bargaining, but the hospital's final offer fell short of the union's demands.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Verna Mae Peacock Cann, a retired social worker and church musician, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 27 at Sinai Hospital. The Parkton resident was 81. Born Verna Mae Peacock in Durham, N.C., she was the daughter of James Otis Peacock and Christine Smith Peacock. She attended Durham public schools and the Mary Potter Academy, a boarding school, before she moved to Baltimore at age 16. She completed adult evening school at City College. She also had an associate of arts degree from Baltimore City Community College.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
John Hopkins Hospital and the union representing housekeepers, food servers and other workers were unable to agree on a contract Thursday night, leaving open the possibility for a strike beginning April. 9. Local union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East is working on behalf of 2,000 hospital employees to push for wage increases. They say many of the workers are on food stamps Medicaid and other public assistance. A Hopkins spokeswoman reiterated Friday that hospital officials were working "to reach a settlement that's fair to everyone and reflects financial responsibility on the part of the hospital.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
The tentative contract reached early Tuesday between Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union representing about 2,000 of its service workers represents a victory not only for the hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East but for Baltimore. The contract raises wages, in some case dramatically so, allowing Hopkins to set an example of what a "living wage" can mean for the health and security of workers in this city. It was a hard-fought effort that included a three-day strike in April and, more recently, intervention by Gov. Martin O'Malley to avert another such action.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 11, 2004
After two years of sometimes-stormy negotiations, the University of Maryland, College Park reached a tentative settlement yesterday with the union representing about 1,800 maintenance and service workers and other staff. The agreement with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees calls for a 4.1 percent pay increase in July, the first raise for workers in two years. It also retains the tuition benefit for the families of employees and limits increases in parking rates for workers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
The key to breaking Baltimore out of economic "stagnation" is for employers - particularly hospitals - to pay low-income service workers higher wages, a health care union argues in a controversial new report. The study, called "Putting Baltimore's People First," is a call to think of economic development in terms of salaries, since workers spend their money locally. It was prepared by the Service Employees International Union District 1199E-DC and released at a press conference at First Baptist Church, in the shadow of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
The hospital service workers union and Johns Hopkins Hospital reached a contract agreement yesterday just seven minutes before workers were to walk out for a three-day strike. The union is to continue discussions with Sinai Hospital today and with Greater Baltimore Medical Center on Monday. Job actions planned for today and tomorrow at both hospitals have been canceled. After two one-day strikes earlier this year, the Service Employees International Union's local - District 1199E-DC - had planned for the local's 2,400 members to participate in a three-day job action at the three hospitals.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
Seeking higher wages and a better chance to expand union coverage, nearly 2,500 service workers are scheduled to stage a one-day walkout tomorrow at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Sinai Hospital. Officials of all three hospitals said they expect to be able to operate normally, using supervisors and volunteers. The union represents dietary, housekeeping, maintenance and clerical workers, along with technicians and patient-care aides. The walkout is scheduled to begin at 6 a.m. "It should be business as usual," said Jill Bloom, a spokeswoman for Sinai.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1994
USAir workers who load and unload aircraft voted overwhelmingly yesterday to unionize, giving the airline another headache as it tries to work its way out of a financial morass.But because none of the three unions competing to represent the 7,687 fleet service workers received a majority of votes, a runoff election will be held this summer to determine whether the United Steelworkers of America or the International Association of Machinists -- the two top vote-getters -- will represent the USAir workers.
NEWS
February 19, 1996
IT IS TROUBLING to see 170 employees of Broadway Services Inc. still denied the wage increase the city promised contracted service workers more than a year ago. After all, that company supported the city's decision to improve the floor wage paid to janitors, cafeteria workers and others who are employed by private companies to work at city buildings.Broadway Services president Tom McGowan even predicted some companies might not pass on their increased labor costs to the city because they would want to remain competitive in bidding for city work.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union that represents 2,000 service workers ended contract talks without an agreement Tuesday night, despite intervention by the governor. The talks were the first since members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union called off a four-day strike last week after Gov. Martin O'Malley asked the two sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. No new bargaining date has been scheduled, but neither side has said it will suspend negotiations.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital will begin a new round of negotiations with the medical institution Tuesday, several days after a strike was averted when Gov. Martin O'Malley asked both sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, is at odds with the hospital mostly over the issue of pay raises. Hospital officials said people's schedules made it better to meet earlier than to take a reprieve.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A four-day strike by service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital that had been scheduled to start Friday was averted after Gov. Martin O'Malley asked both sides to take a one-week cooling-off period. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, gave the hospital a strike notice last week after talks broke down, mostly over the issue of pay raises. "1199 SEIU has agreed not to strike at this time - I appreciate both sides' willingness to continue negotiating in good faith," O'Malley said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The labor union representing Johns Hopkins Hospital's service workers has reached a bargaining impasse with hospital officials and expects to strike Friday. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union gave notice last week to authorize a four-day strike, which would be its second in two months after a three-day strike in April. The union's spokesman, Jim McNeill, said Wednesday night that the two groups had spent the day bargaining, but the hospital's final offer fell short of the union's demands.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
The labor union representing service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital has given the medical institution notice that employees are prepared to strike next week if negotiations over wages remain deadlocked. The notice issued by the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union authorizes a four-day strike beginning June 27 and would be the second strike by the union in two months. The union, which also organized a three-day strike in April, has been negotiating on behalf of 2,000 housekeepers, cooks and other workers.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he supported a plan to boost the minimum wage for janitors, groundskeepers and other service workers employed by private contractors at Baltimore facilities.But he cautioned that a financial crisis could prevent the raise, which would take effect in mid-1995."The understanding is that there has to be sufficient money for the raise to occur. No one wants us to take from other needed programs," Mr. Schmoke said after reaching a compromise over the measure.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
Sinai Hospital announced last night that it reached a tentative contract with its service workers, becoming the second of three Baltimore-area hospitals to settle protracted labor disputes with their unionized staffs. The hospital agreed to a three-year pact that would raise the pay of its service workers to $9.75 an hour by the third year, a hospital spokeswoman said. "We're very pleased to finally have this settled and to get back to business as usual without any further interruptions," said Sinai spokeswoman Jill Bloom.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The labor union representing service workers at The Johns Hopkins Hospital are planning a march and media blitz to criticize the hospital's labor practices after contract negotiations ordered by a federal mediator broke down late Wednesday. The workers, members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, plan to march in downtown Baltimore May 10. Next week, they will place commercials on Baltimore radio stations and advertisements in national newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.